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Copyright, iBqq 
By the Board of Editors 



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THE BRYANT PRB89, FLORENCE,*. MASS. 



T** the donor ^ a 
college gymfiasium 
this volume '^ 
hopefully dedicated. 




STRANGE and dread assembly we ; 
Whatever happens, that we see,— 
Or lacking that, w« qnickly hear. 
For spies w« have both far and near. 
Does Freshman class a meeting hold. 
We know it all before if s cold ; 
Does Sophomore's brain evolve ideas 
With wifldom fraught beyond her yean, 
We find it oat qnick as a wink 
Ere she has had scarce time to think. 
Does Jnnior dar* to brtatk*! Ah. me, 
The fact we greet with noisy glee. 
While o'er the Senior class we keep 
Close watch e'en while they are asleep. 
All things for as are common spoil, 
No secret's sacred aa we toil, 
Bach joke for ns its point has lost. 



Each story which our path has crossed. 

Each jnvenlle effusion wise 

Is viewed with criticizing eyes. 

But if this book you will penue. 

You'll find what we have deigned to use. 

The fmit of the entire year 

Within yonr reach lies garnered here. 

If aoght here worthy is to live 

To Nineteen Hundred credit give. 

If much that's undeserving fame 

The Board will meekly take the blame. 

Peruse, we beg, before you chide 

And don't too scathingly deride. 

We've sought not knowledge to impart ; 

To give amusement, all onr art. 

If this a failure— sad to tell 

We've failed in all. FanweU, farewell ! 




CALENDAR 



iftQQjreie 



e 1900 



Sprii^ Recctt, . - . . . Much 19 to April ii, 

Biccilnimte Sermon, - . . . . Sunday, June 18, 

Meeting' of the Mount Holyoke Alumnc AMOclation, • • Tuesday, A. M., June 10, 

Contmencement Exctcims, - . . . Wednesdiy, it A. M., June 11, 

Enlnncc Eximinatknu, - - - . June 6-8 ind September 11-14, 

Academic Year begrni, .... Thunday, September 14, 

Founder's Diy, ..... Thursday, November 8, 

Thanksgiving Recess, .... Tuesday evening to Friday 

Winter Recess, .... December ao, 1899, to January j, 

Day of Prayer for Colleges, - - . - . Thunday, January 1;, 

Second Scmlster begins, .... Thursday, February 1 , 

Holiday, Waihington's Birthday, .... Thursday, Febniaiy as. 

Spring Ktctai, . - - - . March aS to April 1 1 , 



1899 
1S99 
1899 
1S99 




The board OF TR.USTE 



Rkv, JUDSON smith. D. D., of Boston, 



SIDNEY E. BRIDGUAN, ta NorUuunpton. 
A. LYUAN WILLISTON. A.U., of NorthAmpton. 
EDWARD HITCHCOCK, A.M., U.D.. of Amherat. 
Riv. JOHN L. R. TRASK. D.D.. of Springfield. 
CHARLES A. YOUNG, Ph.D., LL.D.. of Princeton. N. J. 
G. HENRY WHITCOMB, A.M.. of Woroester. 
Mu. A. LYMAN WILLISTON, of NortbAmpton. 
CHARLES E. GARMAN, A.M., of Amberst. 
MERRILL B. GATES, LL.D., of Amberat. 
WILLIAM SKINNER, of Holyoke. 
Riv. HENRY A. STIMSON, D.D., of New York City. 
Hon. WILLIAM WHITING, of Holyok«. 
Hon. W. MURRAY CRANE, of Dalton. 
JOHN P. ANDERSON, }«., of New York City. 
ELBRIDGE TORREY, of BoBfam. 
Miu SARAH P. EASTMAN, of Wellesley. 
Mt» CHARLOTTE MORRILL, of Brooklyn. N. Y., 
MISS ELIZABETH DAVIS, of Pittsfield, 
Ctaoeen by the Alumn«. 
Mm. ELIZABETH STORRS MEAD, A.M., 

Rev. JOHN L. R. TRASK, D.D., 

UCMITUtT. 

A. LYMAN WILLISTON, A.M., 

TMB&lVNait. 





^^^ 




^ 







Tne FflcccLTy bm 



MRS. ELIZABETH STORRS MEAD, A.M., President, 

Theism and Biblical Literature. 

A.M., Obcriin. Studied it Ettrlin. Taught at Andover and Berlin. 

HANNAH NOBLE, 

Painting. 

Stttdied at Mount Holyoke, Botlon, New York and Parii. Taught at Augusta, Maine ; Putnam 

Seminary, Zanetville, Ohio. 

ELLEN PRISCILLA BOWERS, 

English Literature. Emeritus. 
Studied at Mount Holyoke and in England. 

tPRANCES MARY HAZEN. 

Latin. 

Studied at Mount Holyoke, Botanic Garden, Cambridge; Middletown. Conn.; Burlington, VI. 

Taugllt at Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, N. H. Member or American Philological Association. 

ELISABETH MILLER BARDWELL, 

Astronomy ; Director of Ike Observatory. 

Studied at Mount Holyoke ; Dartmouth. Member of the Britith Astronomical Association; Astronomical 

Society of the Pacific; American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

Has written article* for periodicals on astronomical subjects. 

ELIZABETH BARSTOW PRENTISS, 

European History. 

Studied at Mount Holyoke. Taught at Wethetsfield, Vt. ; Columbus, O. ; Wofcester, Mass. 



LOUISE FRANCES COWLES, A.M., 
Geology and Mineralogy. 
A.M., Smith. Studied at Mount Holyoke, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Boston School of Technol- 
ogy, Gunbridge tnd in foreign museums. 

MARY OLIVIA NUTTING, 
Librarian. 

Studied at Mount Holyoke. Member of the American Library Association ; Authors' Guild. Has 
written '*The Days of Prince Maurice." " WiUUm the Silent and the Netherland 

War," and several other books. 

CORNELIA MARIA CLAPP, Ph.D., 

Zoology. 

Ph.B., Syracuse University ; Ph.D., Oiicago University. Studied at Mount Holyoke ; Marine Biological 

Laboratory, Wood's HoU. Taught at Andulasia, Penn. American Associatkm 

for the AdvaiKement of Science ; Morphological Society of American 

Naturalists; Association of G>Ilegiate Ahimnae. Has 

written articles for the Journal of Morphology. 

CLARA WHITE WOOD, 

English. 
Studied at Mount Holyoke. Taught at East Hartford, Brockton, Boston. 

HENRIETTA EDGECOMB HOOKER, Ph.D., 

Botany. 

Ph.D., Syracuse University. Studied at Mount Holyoke ; Martha's Vineyard Summer Institute ; Institute 

of Technology, Boston; Berlin University. Taught in Sydney, Me.; Gardiner, Me.; 

Academy, West Charleston, Yt. Member of the American Association for 

the Advancement of Science ; Association of G>llegiate Alumnae. 

MARGARETHE E. VITZTHUM VON ECKSTADT, 

French Language and Literature. 

Studied at the '* institut des Institutrices," Calluberg, Germany ; Conservatory of Music, Dresden ; and 

in England, Spain and Italy. 

MARY CLEAVELAND BRADFORD, Ph.B., 

Latin. 

Ph.B., Syracuse University. Studied at Mount Holyoke ; Buflalo Normal School. Taught at Lyndon 

Literary Institute, Vt. ; Hitchcock High School, Brimfield, Mass. ; Lewiston High School, 

Me. Member of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae. 

CLARA FRANCES STEVENS. Ph.M., 

English. 

Ph.M., University of Michigan. Studied at Mount Holyoke. Member of the Association of Col^giate 

Alumnae ; of the N. E. Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools, 

9 



SARA A. WORDEN. 

Drawing. 
Studied at Cooper Institute, Art Students' League of New York, Paris. 

MARCIA ANNA KEITH, B.S., 

Physics. 

B.S., Mount Holyoice. Studied at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, University of Berlin. Taught at 

Michigan Seminary. Member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

SARAH EFFIE SMITH, B.S., 

Mathematics. 
B.S.. Mount Holyoke. Studied at Institute of Technology, Boston ; University of Michigan. Member 

of N. E. Association of G>Ileges and Preparatory Schools. 

FLORENCE PURINGTON, B.S., 

Mathematics. 
B.S. , Mount Holyoke. Studied at University of Michigan Summer School. Taught at Waterford, Conn . 

MARY CHANDLER LOWELL, M.D., 

Physician and Instructor in Physiology. 

M.D., Tufts Medical School. Studied at Mount Holyoke, New York Medical School. House Surgeon 

Woman's Hospital ; Physician Maine Insane Hospital. Member of Maine Medical Association. 

LOUISE FITZ-RANDOLPH, 

Archaeology and History of Art. 

Mount Holyoke, 1869-1872 ; Boston University, 1880-1881. Seven years of study and travel in Europe 

and the East, including courses in University College and South Kensington Art School, London; 

College of France and £cole des Beaux Arts, Paris ; American School of Archaeology, 

Athens, with study in the Troad, at Olympia, Argos, Mycenae, in Egypt, and 

in the art centers of Europe. Instructor Lake Erie Seminary, 1 876- ; 

Lecturer Western Reserve School of Design, Cleveland, 

1883-1889 ; Mount Holyoke College, 189a- . 

ALICE PORTER STEVENS, A.B., 

German. 

A.B., Mount Holyoke. Studied at Amherst Summer School of Languages; University of ZQrich ; 

University of Berlin. Taught at Newburyport, Mass. ; Darlington Seminary, 

W. Chester, Pa. ; Salt Uke Academy, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

*MARY FRANCES LEACH, B.S., 

Chemistry. 

B.S., University of Michigan. Studied at Mount Holyoke. Taught at Sedalia, Mo.; Detroit, Mich. 

Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Member of the 

Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft ; of the American Chemical Society. 

*AbMDt for itudy *t Univernlty of Gdttingen, and Polytechuikum *t Zflrich. 

10 



♦REBECCA CORWIN. A.M.. S.T.B., 

Biblical Literature and Semitic Languages. 

A.M., Mount Holyoke ; S.T.B., Hartford Theological Seminary. Graduate work at Hartford. Member 
of the American Oriental Society ; the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis. 

tNELLIE AMELIA SPORE, 
Elocution and Physical Culture. 

Studied at Oberlin and G>meil. Member of the American Assodatkm for the Advancement 

of Physical Educatkm. 

HELEN CURRIER FLINT. A.M., 

Greek. 

A.M., Mount Holyoke. Studied at Boston University ; American School for Qusical Studies at Athens ; 
University of Giicago. Taught at Northfield Seminary, Northfidd, Mass. ; American 

College for Girls, Constantinople, Turkey. 

ALFRED M. FLETCHER, 

Music. 

Studied with Dr. B. C. Blodgett in Pittsfield. Taught with him in Maplewood Seminary three years. 

Organist in South Church at Maplewood. Studied piano with Franz and Theo Kullak in Berlin 

two years. Taught in Chicago six years; tanght in Smith College since 1881, 

except from '89-93. Organist and Director of Music in First Congregational 

Church, Pittsfield, Mass. for eight years. Became Instructor in 

Music at Mount Holyoke in 1893. 

HARRIET L. ELLSWORTH, 

Vocal Music. 

Studied in Worcester County Music School ; with Clarence E. Hay of Boston ; with Clara Munger of 

Boston ; with A. R. Reed in Boston ; with Mr. E. M. Anderson in Worcester ; with Wm. 

Shakespeare in London. Taught in Shelbyville, Kentucky and in Worcester. 

ANN AH MAY SOULE, M.L., 

Constitutional History and Political Economy. 

B.L., M.L., University of Michigan. Taught at State Normal School, Mankato, Minn.; State Noimal 
School, Ypsilanti, Mich. Member of the American Historical Associatu>n, Michigan Political 
Science Association ; Association of Collegiate Alumnae ; New England Association of 
Colleges and Preparatory Schools. Author of Monograph on " The Interna- 
tional Boundary of Michigan," "the Southern and Western 

Boundaries of Michigan." 



^Absent for the second temeeter. 
tAbtent for the year. 



11 



ETHEL GORDON MUIR. Ph.D., 

Philosophy. 
Dalhousie College, Halifax, N. S. B.L., ML, and Ph.D., Cornell. Member of Philomathk 

Society, Dalhousie. 

MARGUERITE SWEET, Ph.D., 
English Literature. 

A.B., Vassar; Ph.D , Bryn Mawr. Member of American Philological Association; Modem Language 

Association of America. Taught five years at Vassar. 

NELLIE ESTHER GOLDTHWAITE, B.S., 

Chemistry. 

B.S., University of Michigan. Fellow of the University of Chicago and ready for Ph.D. Taught at 

famestown, N. Y. 

ELLEN CLARINDA HINSDALE, Ph.D., 

German Language and Literature. 
A.B., Adelbert College^ Cleveland, O.; A.M., University of Michigan. Ph.D., University of Gdttingen. 

Member of New England Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools. 
Taught in High School, Joliet, 111. ; Ann Arbor, Mich. 

FRANCES CURTIS SMITH, A.B., 

French. 
A.B., Smith College. Studied at Dresden, Paris, and Lausanne, Switzerland. 

MARY LAURA JUDD, Ph.B., 

Latin. 

Ph. B., Syracuse University. Studied at Mount Holyoke ; Cornell Summer School. Taught in South 
Hadley High School, Mass. ; Northfield Seminary, Mass. ; Munson Academy, Mass. 

MARY GILMORE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., 

Greek. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. Studied at Mount Holyoke ; American School of Classical Studies at 

Rome. Held Fellowship at University of Michigan for two years. Held traveling Fellowship 

of American Association of Collegiate Alumnae i897-'98. 

ESTHER BOISE VAN DEM AN, Ph.D., 

Latin. 

Ph.D.^ University of Chicago. A.B., A.M., University of Michigan. Fellow at Bryn Mawr and Univer- 
sity of Chicago. Taught at Wellesley. 

MARY OLIVIA CASKEY, B.L., 

Biblical Literature and Semitic Languages, 
B.L., Mount Holyoke Coll^, Hartford Theological Seminary. Taught at Dana School, Morristown, N. J. 



ABBIE HOWE TURNER, A.B., 
Instructor in Zoology. 

GRACE ELLA BERRY. B.S.. 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

MARY ELISABETH HOLMES. A.B., 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

GRACE BIGELOW BAKER. 
Instructor in Botany. 

SERAPH ANNIE BLISS, A.B., 
Laboratory Assistant in Physics. 

VERNETTE LOIS GIBBONS, B.S., 
Laboratory Assistant tn Chemistry. 

JANE BRODIE CARPENTER, A.B., 
Assistant in English. 

LENA MAY ALDRICH, A.B.. 
Assistant in Latin. 

EFFIE ALBERTA READ. 
Laboratory Assistant in Zoology. 

ELLA SILL DICKINSON, A.B., 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

MARION H. STERNS, 
Elocution and Physical Culture. 

BERTHA ELIZA BLAKELY, A.B., 
Assistant Librarian. 

CAROLINE BOARDMAN GREENE, 

Registrar. 

AGNES T. BEMIS, 
Superintendent of Domestic Department. 



13 



LECTURERS AND NON-RESIDENT INSTRUCTORS 

Professor CHARLES A. YOUNG, Ph.D., LL.D.. of Princeton 

University, 
Astronomy. 

Professor CHARLES H. HITCHCOCK, Ph.D., of Dartmouth College, 

Geology. 

Pjofessor WALDO S. PRATT, of Hartford Theological Seminary, 

History of Music, 

LOUIS COENEN, of Springfield, 

Violin. 




14 




jf:^^ ^,^-e^--^ 



ANNAH MAY SOULE, M.L. 

IN the fall of ninety-six occurred many changes in the college curric- 
ulum, the most notable being the enlargement of the Political 

Science department, which before this time had been under the 
direction of the Philosophy professor. At this time both departments 
were enlarged and placed under separate directors. 

Miss Soule, who became the Professor of Political Science, is 
a native of Port Huron, Michigan. Her grandparents on both 
mother's and father's side, coming from New York among the early 
settlers, were prominent in the affairs of the young state of Michigan. 
Patriotism and loyalty to principle displayed themselves early in the 
history of the family, for it is said that during the Revolution Miss 
Soule's great-great-grandparents separated on account of political differ- 
ences. One being a Whig remained in New England, while the other, 
a Tory sympathizer, went to Canada. Miss Soule's father served 
throughout the Civil War as captain and major. He now holds the 
position of Treasurer in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 
where he makes his home. 

Miss Soule's home was in Jackson, Michigan, until she attended 
the Normal School at Ypsilanti, where she came under the instruction 
of Miss Julia Ann King, whose influence led her to the study of History 
and Political Science, which she has since pursued. After leaving the 
Normal School she spent two years at the University of Michigan 
studying History and Constitutional Law. She then taught History 
and Civics for three years at the Normal School of Minnesota, and also 
three years at the Ypsilanti Normal School, after which she returned to 
the University to take the degree of M.L. 

Miss Soule is a contributor to the Political Science Monthly, having 
published two monographs, one on the Southern and Eastern bound- 

17 



aries of Michigan, and one on the Northern and Western boundaries, 
which was most favorably criticized by the German authority Ratzel. 
Miss Soule is a member of the American Historical Society, the Mich- 
igan Historical Association, and also of the Association of Intercollegiate 
Alumnae. In ninety-six Miss Soule came to Mount Holyoke, bringing 
with her the enthusiasm and progressiveness of university life, and the 
desire to do all that lay in her power for the college to which she had 
come. 

To those in her classes Miss Soule is an inspiration because of her 
enthusiasm for her subject and her scholarly methods, while all students 
find in her a ready helper and adviser, a woman who is both broad- 
minded and conservative. 




18 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 

AND POLITICAL ECONOMY 

UNTIL recent years very little attention has been given by the 
college world to a study of United States History, so that Mount 
Holyoke was not behind others when she offered but one course 
in this subject. For some years, however, there was a desire on the 
part of the Faculty and Trustees to increase the amount of work in this 
line, so three years ago a beginning was made. At the same time it 
was decided to increase the work in Political Economy, and these two 
lines of work have since then advanced together. 

For three years now Mount Holyoke College has offered fourteen 
hours of work in United States History and eight hours in Economics. 
In addition to this, the department of Constitutional History and 
Political Economy offers a short course devoted to the development of 
the state from its beginning in the family to its present complicated 
form in Europe and America. In connection with this department, a 
Current Events Club has been organized, and to this students of all 
departments come, to hear what their co-workers have to recount of the 
world's history for the past two weeks. 

The aim of all the work is not only to give culture, but to make 
good citizens and to help those who may train others for citizenship. 
For this reason the work is made as practical as possible, encouraging, 
in the line of History, a study of local and home history, and in 
Economics a study of actual social and industrial conditions, as well as 
of forms and theories. For this kind of work, in History particularly, 
many books are needed, and the department is constantly in search 
of documents, letters, and local publications. Several friends have 
"given of their garrets" for our use, and there are now frequent 
requests for the ''New Hampshire Provincial Papers" and other publi- 

19 



cations rescued from oblivion and brought into service. And when we 
use them we wonder if there are not other friends who have similar 
** rubbish" which might serve us in our eflfort to become better scholars 
and more intelligent citizens. 

Even as late as three years ago there were those who questioned 
the need, or even the advisability, of oflfering such courses at a woman's 
college. But the thoughtfulness, intelligence and interest with which 
the Mount Holyoke students have undertaken and carried on this work, 
as well as the growing interest in all the courses offered, seem in them- 
selves a justification of the establishment of this department. Never in 
its history has this country needed more intelligent citizens, and it is 
hoped that Mount Holyoke is doing her share in fitting her students for 

life in a republic. 

Annah May Soule. 



•t 






20 




IN the fifty-eighth year of the College of Mary Lyon came the Ninety* 
niners to that place. Now the College of Mary Lyon is ia the city 

of Altna Mater. And in all the days of that college there were 
none like to the Ninety-niners, for they were strong and mighty and 
feared neither man nor woman. And Uie Ninety-niners made a league 
and covenant with each other after the manner of that city ; and they 
caused the scribe to write it in a book that the Ninety-niners every one 
should set her mark thereto. But the enemy came with craftiness and 
stole it away. Wherefore the children of that city mocked them, saying, 
"Where now is that constitution which ye have made ?" But the 
reason of this thing was because of the wickedness of the children of 
that city. 

And the Ninety-niners took unto them elders which should be for 
guides unto them, — a certain bachelor whose surname was Merrick, and 
Abbe who was master of the arts, and a doctor of philosophy whose 
surname was Hamlin. And besides these took they unto them William, 
whose surname was McKinley, who was the chief ruler of all the land. 

And it was winter. And there was much snow in that place. And 
the Ninety-niners said one to another, " Let us now go a-sleighing." 
But when they arose in the morning the snow was gone up from the 
face of the earth, Wherefore they went not. 



In the fifty- ninth year of the college there was a great burning, and 
the fire devoured the great dwelling of that city. Wherefore the child- 
ren of that house were driven forth to seek a shelter among the dwellers 
in the wilderness. And the doors were opened unto them. And they 
were scattered abroad throughout the wilderness. And while they did 
sojourn with the people of the wilderness they were grievously afflicted 
by stoves, both for coal and for oil, and for wood. For when they 
were made hot they were hot like to a fiery furnace, and the heat which 
they gave forth was as the heat of an oven where men bake beans. But 
when they were left they were cold even as frost is cold. Moreover 
when the summer began to draw nigh, the face of that land was covered 
with mud, even to a man's ankles. But for all these things they ceased 
not to perform the task which was allotted unto them, for they were 
filled with the spirit of Alma Mater. 

In the same year came there snow upon the earth. And they looked 
and behold the earth was covered with snow. And they said one to 
another, ** Go to, now, let us go a-sleighing, and let us also break bread 
together." And they rose up hastily while the snow was yet on the 
ground, and went a-sleighing and broke bread together in the city of 
Springfield. 

And after many days they gathered unto them all their friends and 
acquaintances ; and they said, * * Let us now cast the ballot for the colleges 
of young men, and let us see which shall have the ascendency." And 
they did so; but they caused every man which did cast a ballot to cast 
also the twentieth part of a shekel into the treasury. And the sons of 
Eli, called Yale, said among themselves, ** Shall the sons of Amherst 
now excel us? " Wherefore they cast many ballots and surpassed the 
sons of Amherst. And when it was known that they had surpassed the 
sons of Amherst there went up a great shout. And much gold was 
gathered into the treasury on that day. 

Now it was the custom of the children of that city to contend with 
one another in throwing the ball. And the Ninety-niners met the 
children of the Century, and contended with them in throwing the ball ; 
and they contended with great strength furiously, but neither prevailed, 
for the score was a tie. 

24 



In the sixtieth year of the College of Mary Lyon, (the same is the 
third year of the sojourn of the Ninety-niners in that city,) were the 
people of the city taxed. And the Ninety-niners rendered up the 
treasure willingly, but the other children refused. Wherefore the 
Ninety-niners were in this thing more righteous than the other children. 

Now in all that land there were none that could skill to play before 
their fellows like to the Ninety-niners. And they set forth unto their 
fellows the play of one William whose surname was Shakespeare, which 
he wrote in a book. And the name of the play was ** A Midsummer 
Night's Dream." And many of the people of that place came together 
to behold. 

Moreover there were great singers among them, so that there were 
none like unto them among all the children of that land, neither before 
nor after them. And their songs are written in the book of songs which 
remaineth unto this day. 

In the fourth year of their sojourning they went not forth to con- 
tend with their fellows in throwing the ball and in other sports, for 
they said, ** Sports be for babes.'' Wherefore they went not forth. 

Now these Ninety-niners were exceeding great in the study of 
theism, and they were very well versed in the Scriptures, so that they 
could write them from memory. And the writings of the Scriptures 
which they did make from memory, are they not kept in the archives of 
the College of Mary Lyon unto this day? 

And when the Ninety-niners had made an end of their sojourn they 
went forth from the city of Alma Mater that they might * * doe ye nexte 
thynge." 



25 



OFFICERS 

Pfisid$nU ...... EUGENIE BROEKSMIT. 

yU$-Pr$5ident, ..... SUSAN BROWN LEITER. 

Seerttarf, ...... ALICE WARD CHASE. 

Treasunr, ....... ANNA MOWER. 

Historian. ...... BERTHA WHITTEMORE. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

GRACE HOWE McKINLEY, MARY AUGUSTA LEAVITT, 

SARAH ELIZA HILLHOUSE, SARAH CORNELIA EDWARDS. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

PRESIDENT WILLIAM McKINLEY, ALICE HAMLIN HINMAN, Ph.D., 

ELIZABETH F. ABBE, A.M., MARY FRANCES MERRICK, A.B., 

ALICE PORTER STEVENS, A.B. 

MEMBERS 
Andrews, Florence May, Sj Frank/in Street, Lynn, Mass, 

Scientific ; Private School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

Bid well, Alice Townsend, S A, Freeport, III, 

Literary ; Freeport High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association ; Editor of Mount Holyoke, 
'97-'99 ; Glee Club. '97-'99. 

• 

Bishop, Elizabeth Alice, Warsaw, N, Y, 

Qassical ; Warsaw Union School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

Blanchard, Carrie Edna, Ascutneyville, Vt, 

Gassical ; Kimball Union Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Debating Society, 
'98-99; Glee Club, '96-99; President of Class, *97-*98; Vice-President of Vermont Qub, '96- '98. 

Booth, Daisy Agnes, 75 Elm Street, Bristol, Conn, 

Litcraiy ; Bristol High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Glee Gub, '96-'97. 

Broeksmit, Eugenie, S d, 828 Second Avenue, Cedar Rapids, la. 

Literary ; Coe College ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; Glee Gub, 
'97-'99 ; Prtsidcnt of We Westerners, '97-'98 ; President of Class, '98-'99. 

26 



Chase, Alice Ward, Hartford^ Conn. 

Literary ; Wheaton Seminary, Norton ; Y. W. C. A. ; Secretary of Class, '98- '99. 

Clancy, Lota Norton, Gilead, Conn, 

Literary ; Kimball Union Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Seaetary of Athletic Association, '97-*98 ; 
Business Manager of Gass Basket Ball Team, '97-'98 ; Vice-President of Tennis Association, 
»97-»98 ; Vice-President of Granite State Club, '97-'98. 

Clark, Florence Elizabeth, 1 6 A, Farmington, Conn, 

Classical ; Private Instruction ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Executive Committee of 
Qass, '97-'98. 

Cobleigh, Maude Gertrude, jp High Street, South Gardner, Mass. 

Gassical; Gardner High School; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Secretary of Gass, '97-'98. 

Davis, Alice Stevens, p/ Vernon Street, West Gardner, Mass. 

Classical ; Gardner High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Debating Society, 
'98-^99 ; Athletic Association ; Seaetary of Class, '96-^97 ; College Basket Ball Team, '96-'97 ; 
Gass Basket Ball Team, '95-'98 ; Editor of Uamarada, '97-'98. 

Dean, Fannie, SOX, 80 Locust Avenue, Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Literary ; Amsterdam Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Executive Committee of 
Gass, '97-'98 ; President of Empire State Club, '98-^99 ; Banjo Club, '98-'99 ; Executive Com- 
mittee of League, '98-'99. 

Doane, Susan Helen, S J, i2j Lincoln Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

Classical ; Holyoke High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; 
Executive Committee of Gass, '95-'96 ; President of Gass, '96-^97 ; Business Manager of 
Uamarada, '97-'98 ; Executive Committee of League, '97-^98 ; President of League, '98-^99. 

Dow, Susan Lydia, Bolton, Mass. 

Literary ; Friend's School, Providence^ R. I. ; Oak Grove Seminary, Vassalboro, Maine ; Y. W. 
C. A.; Debating Society ; Secretary of M. H. M. A. ; Class Basket Ball Team, '96-'97. 

Edwards, Sarah Cornelia, 161 Baldwin Street, New Brunswick, N. J. 

Gassical; New Brunswick High School; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association; Glee Club, 
'96-'98 ; President of Tennis Association, '97-^98 ; Executive Committee of League, '98-'99. 
President of Mosquito Gub, '98-'99 ; Executive Committee of Class, '98-'99. 

Erskine, Ella Frances, 176 Falcon Street, East Boston, Mass. 

Scientific ; East Boston High, and Girls' Latin School ; Athletic Association. 

Farrington, Ella Marion, jj Smith Street, Portland, Me. 

Gassical ; Portland High School ; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society ; Treasurer of Gass, '96-'97. 

Fitch, Ida Mabel, 1200 Independence Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

Scientific ; Kansas Gty High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Glee Gub, '9d-'98 ; Leader of Glee 
Gub, '98-'99. 

Fox, Alice Annette, 8 Hanover Street, West Springfield, Mass. 

Gassical ; West Springfield High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

27 



Haight, Ruth Wood, ^ ft, 6 Conrtland Street, Norwich, N, V. 

Literary ; Cazenvia Seminary ; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society. 

Hall, Helen Mary, jjj Ashland Street, Manchester, N, H. 

Classical ; Manchester High School ; Secretary and Treasurer of Granite State Club, '97-'98. 

Hallock, Frances Adelia, Steubenville, O. 

Literary ; Steubenville High School; Y. W. C. A. 

Hammond, Marion Isabelle, Fishkill-on- Hudson, N. Y, 

Literary ; Private School ; Y. W. C. A. 

Hillhouse, Sara Eliza, Willimantic, Conn. 

Classical ; Willimantic High School; Athletic Association ; Basket Ball Team, '96- '98 ; Execu- 
tive Committee of Class, '98-*99. 

Hodgdon, Mary Frost, 32 Church Street, Westbrook, Me, 

Classical ; Westbrook High School ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Hume, Adaline Meech, Warsaw, N, Y. 

Gassical ; Warsaw Union School ; Y. W. C. A. 
Johnson, Edina May, S4 South Main Street, Winsted, Conn. 

Scientific ; West Winsted High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

Kelso, Jennie, Belleime, la. 

Scientific ; Lenox College, Hopkinton, la. ; Y. W. C. A. ; Seaetary and Treasurer of We 
Westerners, *97-*98. 

Learned, Grace Whitney, 9 Pleasant Street, Nezv London, Conn, 

Classical; Williams Memorial Institute ; Y. W. C. A.; Treasurer of M. H. M. A., '96- '98 ; 
Treasurer of Class, *97-*98. 

Leavitt, Mary Augusta, jo Adams Street, Somennlle, Mass. 

Qassical ; Entered Junior from Wellesley College ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Class, 
'98-'99. 

Leiter, Susan Brown, East Clarence, N. Y. 

Scientific ; Yonkers High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Class, '97-'98 ; Vice- 
President of Class, '98-'99. 

Magrath, Marguerite Ursula, 22 Saratoga Street, East Boston, Mass. 

Scientific ; East Boston High School ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; Basket Ball 
Team, '96-*98. 

Mallory, Clara Frances, "9 ft, West Hartford, Conn. 

Classical ; Hartford High School ; Vice-President of Y. W. C. A., »97-'98 ; Glee Club, •95-*97; 
President of Choral Society, '96-'98 ; Athletic Association. 

28 



Matson, Marie Isabelle, S J, 6op Cleveland Avenue, Chicago, III. 

Literary; North Division High School, Chicago ; Y. W. C. A.; Vice- President of Debating 
Society, '9^''99 ; Athletic Association ; Secretary of CUss, '95 -'96 ; Glee Club, '95 '-99 ; Editor 
of Llamarada, '97-^98 ; President of We Westerners, '98-'99. 

McKinley, Grace Howe, 2' B X, 851 IV. Tuscarawas Street, Canton, O. 

Literary ; Miss Buckinghanrs School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Class, *98-'99. 

Mendum, Caroline Hendley, ^ ft, 2pp Main Street, Hingham, Mass. 

Classical ; Hingham High School ; Debating Society ; Executive Committee of Qass, '96-^97 ; 
Assistant Business Manager of Llamarada. '97-'98. 

Miles, Jennie Ethel, 77 Maple Street, Bristol, Conn. 

Literary ; Bristol High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Class Basket Ball Team, 
'95-'97- 

Mohn, Martha Adele, Mannheim, Bci^crly, N. J. 

Literary ; Farnum Preparatory School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Seaetary and 
Treasurer of Tennis Association, *97-'98 ; President of Mosquito Qub. *97-'9*^ ; Vice-President 
of Mosquito Club, '98-'99. 

Morse, Lilla Frances, "9 ft, 22 Mt. Pleasant Street, St. Johnsbury, Vt: 

Literary; St. Johnsbury Academy; Secretary of Y. W. C. A., '95-'96; President of Y. W. C. A., 
'98-*99 ; Debating Society ; Executive Committee of Class, '95-'96 ; Executive Committee of 
Vermont Club, '96 ^97 ; Assistant Business Manager of Mount Holyoke, '96-'97 ; Business 
Manager of Mount Holyoke, '97- 98. 

Mower, Anna Louise, Morrisville, Vt. 

Literary ; Morrisville High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Executive Committee of 
Vermont Club, *97-'98 ; Editor of LLimarada, '97-'98 ; Treasurer of Gass, *98-'99. 

Nettleton, Amy Augusta, Washington, Conn. 

Qassical ; The Gunnery ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Debating Society, '97-'9B ; 
Banjo Qub, '98-^99. 

Owen, Julia French, Barton, Vt. 

Qassical ; St. Johnsbury Academy ; Y. W. C. A.; President of Qass, '95-*96 ; Vice-President 
of M. H. M. A , '96-*97 ; President of Vermont Qub, *97-*99 ; Editor of Llamarada, '97- '98 ; 
Executive Committee of Student League, '97-'98 ; Editor of Mount Holyoke, '98- '99. 

Partridge, Charlotte Louise, S J, ij2 State Street, Augusta, Me. 

Classical ; Cony High School ; Athletic Association ; Secretary and Treasurer of Pine Tree State 
Club, '95-*96, Vice-President, '96- '97 ; Executive Committee of Class, '96- '97 ; Qass Basket 
Ball Team, *97-*98 ; Art Editor of Llamarada, '97-'98. 

Peabody, Anna Howe, Danvers Centre, Mass. 

Scientific; Holton High School ; Y. W; C. A.; Athletic Association ; Basket Ball Team, '96-'9K. 

Pinney, Josephine Eunicia, Rockville, Conn. 

Literary ; Rockville High School ; Editor-in-Chief of Llamarada, '97-'98. 

39 



Plumb, Carrie Louise, Terryinlle, Conn. 

Literary ; Terryville High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society ; Athletic Associatioii ; 
Class Basket Ball Team, '95-'98. 

Robinson, Alice Leavitt, j/ Church Street^ Winchester^ Mass. 

Gassical ; Winchester High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

Roraback, Maria Louise, Canaan, Conn. 

Literary ; Canaan Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Sargent, Bessie Cleveland, Methuen, Mass. 

Literary ; Methuen High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Executive Committee of 

Sawyer, Martha Frances, Winchendon, Mass. 

Literary ; Murdock School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society. 

Schuyler, Mary Eloise, Everett, Pa. 

Literary ; Entered junior from Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. ; Y. W. C. A. ; Vice- 
President of Keystone State Club, '98-^99. 

Shearer, Katharine Lillian, /// E. S4ih Street, New York City. 

Classical ; Private Instruction ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Sinclair, Janet, 7p Elm Street, Charlestown, Mass. 

Literary ; Charlestown High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Editor of Mount 
Holyoke, '97-'98 ; Editor-in-Chief of Mount Holyoke, '98-'99. 

*Smith, Eva Frances, £ 6 X, Huntington, N. Y. 

Classical ; Huutington Union School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

Sturtevant, Clara Loomis, J5 Pleasant Street, Ware, Mass. 

Classical ; Ware High School ; Y. W. C. A.; President of Debating Society, '98-^99; Athletic 
Association ; Executive Committee of Class, 'g6-'98. 

Turner, Jennie Dorcas, Great Barrington, Mass. 

Literary ; Houstonic Hall ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association : Basket Ball Team, '96-'98 ; 
Executive Committee of Class, '97 ; Vice-President of Oass, '98 ; Chaimum of Lectureship 
Committee, *98-'99. 

Vickery, Myra Frances, 22s Center Street, Bangor, Me. 

Literary ; Bangor High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Wayave, Antoinette Francoise, J2g E. 2d. Street, Corning, N. Y. 

Gassical ; Corning Free Academy ; Y. W. C. A. Vice-President of Empire State Gub, '97-^98. 

Whittemore, Bertha, Winchendon, Mass. 

Literary ; Murdock School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Class Historian 9i-'99. 
'Died Feb. 5, 1899. 

30 



Williams, Ethel, -?/ Pearl Street, Milford, Mass. 

Literaiy ; Millord High School ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Wilson, Carolyn Edith, SOX, 24.^ Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Literary ; Haverhill High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Glee Club, '94-^96. 

Woodman, Mary Milton, West Lebanon, N. H. 

Qassical ; W. Lebanon High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Secretary of M. H. M. A., '97-'98. 

Yegashira, Hide, Kobe, Japan. 

Literary ; Kobe College ; Y. W. C. A. ; Seaetary of Debating Society, '97-'98. 




31 



FORMER MEMBERS 



Barnes, Clara Eliza, 
Bishop, Elizabeth, 
Bliss, Annie Taylor, 
Bowman, Laura, 
Bradstreet, Ethel Maria, 
Brioham, Miriam Allyn, 
Brigham, Ruth Ryder, 
Brown, Helen Cady, 
Carpenter, Alice, 
Carter, Edith, 
Chase, Laura, 
CuRTiss, Adelaide, 
Day, Alice Ruth, 
Day, Emma Shepherd, 
Devereux, Harriet Sherman, 
Devereux, Pauline Faye, 
Drew, Isabel Rich, 
Ford, Eunice Louisy, 
Gaylord, Cordelia Dickinson, 
GiLNACK, Lilla Eliza, 
Granniss, Laura, 
Hall, Annie, . 
Laurie, Jessie Porter, 
Mann, Helen Elfreda, 
McLean, Emma Jane, 
Melvin, Lily Greenleaf, 
Merrill, Fannie Alice, 
Page, Caroline Elizabeth, 
Parker, Bessie Anna, 
Paterson, Kate Elizabeth, 
Perry, Birdine, 
Peterson, Minnie Zoe, . 
Phelps, Florence Dell, 
Rice, Mabel Anna, 
Roberts, Edith Mary, 
Robinson, Mary Louisa, 
Sags, Lillian Belle, 
Smiley, Alice Eugenie, 
Storrs, Marion, 
Stoskoph, Florence, 
Thayer, Marjorie, 
Waite, Ida Tanner, 
Williams, Elizabeth, 



2^6 



TorringtoHf Conn. 

Warsaw, N. Y. 

Franklin, N. H, 

p Burlington Avenue, 'Boston, Mass. 

DanverSf Mass. 

1 8)8 Hinman Avtnue, Chicago, III. 

The Follansbee, Chicago, III. 

HousatoniCt Mass. 

Monson, Mass, 

Montclair, N.J. 

Holyoki, Mass. 

FishkiU'On-the-Hudson, N. Y. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Gardiner, Me, 

Castine, Me. 

Castine, Me. 

Sharon, Mass. 

Northfield, Mass. 

North t/lmherst, Mass. 

Rockville, Conn. 

Pequahuck, Conn. 

IVallingford, Conn, 

Bellefante, Pa, 

Beverly, N.J, 

Rockville, Conn, 

Derb/, N. H. 

South Acworth, N. H, 

Littleton, N, H. 

South Coventry, Conn, 

Montreal, Can, 

Black River Falls, fVis, 

Augusta, Me, 

Whiting, yt. 

South Deerfield, tAfass, 

Youngstown, O. 

Vienna, Va, 

Norwich, N, Y. 

Bangor, CMe, 

tMansJield Center, {Mass, 

, Freeport, III. 

South nth Street, Thiladelphia, Pa, 

Brattleboro, Vt, 
Corning, N. Y, 



32 




w 



Motto : Doe ye nexte thynge. 
Colors : Purple and white. 
Yell: Rackity koaxy koax^ koaxy 

Tare toe-lixy toe-lixy toe-lix! 

Wah hoc wahy wah hoo wahy 

*pp Holyokey Rahy Rahy Rah! 
Flower: The fleur-de-lis. 

CLASS SONG 

Tune : * * Scots wha' hae " 

E are the class of Ninety-nine, As Henry's plume shone at 

In royal colors do we shine, Navarre, 

Spotless white and purple fine, The white shall be our guidingstar, 

And the fleur-de-lis. To ** doe ye nexte thynge** never 

The purple be our sign of might, far 

The white give strength to do the From those who seek the right. 

right, Adorned with royal purple, we 

Lily of France for honor bright. Like Sheba's queen will bow the 

Holyoke Ninety-nine. knee 

To wisdom as *t is taught by thee. 
Mount Holyoke ever dear. 

And when old Time the century 

rends. 
And other duties each one sends 
To follow her ambition*s ends 

The wide world o'er, 
We'll be faithful, pure and true, 
To Alma Mater and the blue. 
With all the dear ones that we 

knew 
In Holyoke Ninety-nine. 




1^ 



.vft^r^, 




* 





Parti 






Chronicle of Events 


Fin. 


SiluUtionto 1901. 


Juniot Prom? 


RcMption. -gTto'oo. 


Our Ous Song. 


Under Dr. Miur'i Window 


EKcli«<. 


publifation— Fin de Siede Maguiiw. 




SUiiliiUe, (Hoi OKynliU.) H'Ui 


In WonderUnd with Ali<:e. 


Humh! FiciaDiy. 


OurSldghrid.. 


'Oo Lhmmd*. 




Mmdolki and GuUu Quttt, Wniiims. 


Requieiat in pice ! 


A GMdcn Puty, 'oc to 


■98. Our Debate with igoi. 




NoncVd.,'!,,. 


Reception to 'qS. 





\ \ \ "7/ 




CHARACTERISTICS 



I. Iddls. 

3. Anilytjcal Thought. 

3. Self Esteem. 

4. Wonder. 

;, Imagbition. 

6. Destructiveness, 

7 Au«tliv«neu. 

g. Dignity. 

10. Esthetic Taste. 



II. Reverence. 

11. Cautiousness. 

\y. Benevolence. 

1 4. Veneration. 

15. Adaptability. 

16. Conscientiousness. 

17. Endurance. 

18. Concenlralivtness. 
I g. Combativeness. 
ao Tact. 



OFFICERS 



Tnsidint, 

Vice-President, 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, 

Factotum, 

Historian, 



MARIE WOLCOTT WELLES. 

MINNIE WURTH CRANE. 

GRACE HOLLISTER MERWIN. 

ETHEL HANNAH BARDWELL. 

MABEL AUGUSTA CANADA. 

JEAN DEAN COLE. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ANGELINE PECK ADAMS, 
GRACE ELDRIDGE BEACH, 



TIRZAH SNELL SMITH, 
ISABEL RICH DREW. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



PROFESSOR A. M. FLETCHER, 
ANNAH MAY SOULE, M.L., 
Mr. GEORGE CUTLER, 



Mr. GEORGE CUTLER, Jr.. 
EFFIE ALBERTA READ, 
LENA MAY ALDRICH, A.B. 



Mr. BYRON SMITH. 

MEMBERS 
Adams, Angeline Peck, 2* 6 X, y^ Pleasant Street, Arlington, Mass, 

Sdentific; Arlington High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
Qass Basket Ball Team, '97'-99; Executive Committee of Class, '98-99; Business Manager of 
Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Qubs, '98-'99. 

AUyn, Louise, 2^7 High Street, Bristol, Conn, 

Uterary; Bristol High School; Y. W. C. A. 

Armington, Bessie Brigham,^ ft, Elm Lawn, Dorchester, Mass, 

Classical; Dorchester High School; Executive Committee of Y. W. C. A., '98'- '99. 

Arnold, Ruth Stewart, "9 ft, i68j Cambridge Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Literary; Gassical English High School; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

Ball, Margaret Elizabeth, S <P A, 84 Aycrigg Avenue, Passaic, N. /. 

Literary; Anderson High School, Indiana; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Banjo Club, 
'96-99; Executive Committee of League, '97- '98; Mandolin Club^ '98-'99; Mount Holyoke 
Board, '98-99. 



39 



Bardwell, Ethel Hannah, jo Federal Street, Greenfield, Mass. 

Scientific; Greenfield High School; Y. W C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
Treasurer of Class, '98- '99. 

Barker, Abbie Cogswell, Cedar Groz'e, Me. 

Literary; *' Hillview," Conway, Mass.; Y. W. C. A 

Beach, Grace Eldridge, ^6 Wlialley Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

Literary; Hillhouse High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Treasurer of Class, '<)o-'97; 
Mendelssohn Club, '96-'99; Executive Committee of Class, '98- '99. 

Belcher, Alice Emeline, iS Townsend Street, Pepperell, Mass. 

Literary; Cushing Academy; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Vice-President of Spinning 
Wheel Club. 

Boyd, Essie Winning, Martin s Ferry, Ohio. 

Literary; Entered Sophomore from University of Minnesota; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society. 

Bradford, Mary Alice, 41^ Seaver Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

Literary; Charlestown High School; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society; Secretary and Treasurer 
of Baked Bean Club, '98- '99. 

Bradley, Susan Mary, ^ ft. Berry Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

Literary; West Roxbury High School ; Debating Society; Editor of Llamarada, '98-'99. 

Browne, Alice Seymour, "9 ft. Woodland Road, Auhurndale, Mass. 

Classical; Cambridge Latin School; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
Student Volunteers; Editor of Mount Holyoke, '98-'99. 

Canada, Mabel Augusta, 710 Chapel Street, New Haven, Conii. 

Literary; Entered Sophomore from Bryn Mawr; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic 
Association; Factotum of Class, '98-'99; Editor of Llamarada, '98-'99. 

Chamberlain, Florence Edna, 6y Thompson Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Literary; Springfield High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Executive Committee of 
Gass, *96-*97; Secretary of Springfield Club, '98- '99. 

Collins, Agnes Louise, -S' B X, ij Hillside Avenue, AfPiesbury, Mass. 

Literary; Home School, Everett, Mass ; Y. W. C. A. ; Leader of Banjo Oub, '98- '99. 

Crane, Minnie Wurth, 801 Park Avenue, Omaha, Neb. 

Literary; Omaha High School; Y. W. C. A ; Secretary of Debating Society, *98-'99; Vice- 
President of Wc Westerners, *97-*98; Vice-President of Class, '98-*9(j. 

Curtis, Clintie Delafield, 116 Atlantic Street, Jersey City, N. J. 

Literary; Jersey City High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Factotum of Class, 
'97-'98; Secretary and Treasurer of Boat Qub, '98- '99; Secretary and Treasurer of Mosquito 
Club, '98-'99. 

40 



Davis, Marinda Polly, Acworth, N. H. 

Gassical; Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, Mass ; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association. 

Devereux, Pauline Faye, Corner Court and State Streets y Castine^ Me. 

Literary; Bangor High School ; Y. W. C. C; Debating Society ; Athletic Association; Execu- 
tive Committee of Maine Club; '95-*96. 

Dougherty, Ida Marion, E X, Fairport, N. V. 

Gassical ; Union School; Y. W. C. A., Debating Society; Athletic Association; Art Editor of 
Llamarada, ^gS-^. 

Douglas, Helen, 410 Wayne Street, Peoria, III. 

Literary; Peoria High School; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society. 

Drew, Isabel Rich, I 6 X, Sharon, Mass. 

Literary; West Roxbury High School; Debating Society; Athletic Association; Executive Com- 
mittee of *99, '96-'97; President of '99, '97-98; Executive Committee of 1900, '98-*99. 

Dunning, Elizabeth Meredith, Franklin, Mass. 

Classical; Worcester Classical. 

Fairbanks, Winifred Luella, 166 Chestnut Street, Gardner, Mass. 

Uterary; Gardner High School; Y. W. C. A.; Executive Committee of Wachusett Qub, 

Field, Alice Carey, 39 Richards Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Qassical; Worcester Classical ; Y. W. C. A. 

Foster, Frances Richmond, ^ ft, Hingha^n, Mass. 

Qassical; Hingham High School; Debating Society. 

Foster, Marion, ji6 Central Street, Auburndale, Mass. 

Qassical; Girls* Latin School, Boston; Y. W. C. A. 

Gaylord, Gertrude Elizabeth, South Hadley, Mass. 

Classical; South Hadley High School; Y. M. C. A. 

Gilnack, Lilla Eliza, /p Elm Street, Rockinlle, Conn, 

Qassical; Rockville High School; Y. W. C. A. 

Gould, Myrabel Josephine, 5/ High Street, Greenfield, Mass. 

Scientific; Entered Sophomore firom Wellesley; Debating Society; Athletic Association. 

Graham, Minnie Almira, JSS Market Street, Lockport, N. Y. 

Qassical; Locksport Union School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society. 

Guild, Eleanor Wilmot, Walpole, Mass. 

Literary; Shawmut School, Dorchester; Y. M. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association. 

Hale, Harriet Louise, Ottumwa, la. 

Literary ; Entered Junior from Iowa College ; Y. W. C. A. ; Glee Club, '98-*99. 

41 



Hammond, Grace Twemlow, Fishkill-on-Hudsony N. V. 

Literary; DeGarmo Institute ; Debating Society; Editor of Llamarada, qS-'qq. 

Harrington, Jessie Leota, Medfieldy Mass. 

Classical ; Hull High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association ; Captain of Class Basket Ball 
Team, '96-*98 ; Executive Committee of Class, '97-'98 ; Secretary of League, '98. 

Haskell, Edith Stone, ^ ft, Sg Beacon Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Literary ; Hyde Park High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Vice-President of Qass, 
'96-97 ; Treasurer of Athletic Association, 'q7-*99. 

Hazen, Helen Augusta, poj Watchung Avenue, Plainfield, N, J. 

Classical ; Plainfield High School. 

Howe, Grace Adeline, 2^1 Chestnut Street, Gardner, Mass. 

Literary ; ** Hillview," Conway, Mass ; Y. W. C. A. 

Huntress, Verena, 20 Woodside Avenue, Amherst, Mass. 

Qassical ; Westfield High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Banjo Club, '96-*99. 

Jackson, Helen, Andm^er, Mass. 

Qassical ; Entered Sophomore from Abbot Academy, Andover ; Y. W. C. A. 

Jordan, Susie May, North Windham, Me. 

Qassical ; Penned Institute, Gray, Me.; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society. 

Juliand, Cornelia Emma, Greene, N. V. 

Qassical ; Jefferson High School, Chicago ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Associa- 
tion ; Executive Committee of Golf Club, '97 -'08. 

Kendall, Helen Idella, S (P J, Walpole, Mass. 

Classical ; Walpole High School ; Y. W. C A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; Class 
Basket Ball Team, '96-^99 ; Executive Committee of Baked Bean Club, '98-'99 ; Assi!»tant Busi- 
ness Manager of Llamarada, '98-'99. 

Kendrick, Mary Katherine, s^95 ^^^^ Versen Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Literary ; Shurtleff College, Upper Alton, 111.; Y. W. C. A. 

Kimball, Eleanor Rosannah, I 6 X. Worcester, Mass. 

Literary; Worcester Classical ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Seaetary of Class, *97-'98; 
Qass Basket Ball Team, '97-'99 ; Glee Club, '98-'99 ; Editor of Llamarada, '98. 99. 

Knight, Jennie Louise, Leicester, Mass. 

Scientific ; Leicester Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society. 

Lane, May Rogers, 2^ Pierce Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 

Qassical ; Hyde Park High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Class Basket Ball Team, '96-^98 ; Vice- 
President of Athletic Association, '97-'99 ; Captain of Boat Club, '97-'^; Athletic Director of 
Qass, '97-'98 ; Editor of Llamarada, '98.'99. 

42 



Long, Eleanor Jennings, SOX, ^i South Second Street, Easton, Penn. 

Literary ; Easton High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; President of Keystone Club, *98-'99. 

Masters, Mabel Edna, 12^ North Main Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Literary; Springfield High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
Executive Committee of Gass, '96-'97 ; Banjo Qub, '97-'99. 

McConnell, Lillian Brown, Merrvnac, Mass. 

Literary ; Merrimac High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association. 

McLean, Emma Jane, 3 A, 7 Pleasant Street, Rockville, Conn. 

Literary ; Rockville High School ; Y. W. C. A. 

McPherson, Harriet Phebe, Rockville, Conn. 

Literary ; Rockville High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Secretary and Treasurer 
of GolfGub, '98-'99. 

Mead, Belle Louise, Greenwich, Conn. 

Literary ; Greenwich Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Debating Society, 
'98-^99; Executive Committee of Athletic Association, '97-'98; Class Basket Ball Team, 
'96-'99 ; President of Golf Gub, '97-'98 ; Factotum of Gass, '97-'98 ; Editor of Llamarada, 

'98.'99. 

Mead, Louise Celestia, Round Hill, Conn. 

Literary ; Greenwich Academy ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; Execu- 
tive Committee of Gass, '97-'98 ; Editor-in-Chief of Llamarada, '9H-'99. 

Merwin, Grace HoUister, New Milford, Conn. 

Literary; Hillview, Conway, Mass.; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Seaetary of Class, 
'98-*99. 

Meserve, Bertha Niles, 87 Linden Street, Allston, Mass. 

Literary; Girls' High, Boston ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Miller, Emily Mulford, S (P A, Floral Park, N. Y. 

Classical ; Blair Hall, Blairstown, N. J. ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Class Basket Ball 
Team, *96-*99 ; Executive Committee of Class, '96- '97 ; President of Gass, *97-'98 ; Vice-Presi- 
dent of Empire State Gub, '98-'99. 

Moore, Katherine Sophia, Gill, Mass. 

Scientific; Northfield Seminary ; Y. W. C. A. 

Murdock, Julia Frances, Port Henry, N. Y. 

Literary ; Eauclair High School, Wisconsin ; Y. W. C. A. 

Newton, Helen Florence, Woodbridge, Conn. 

Scientific ; HiUhouse High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

43 



Nims, Elizabeth Theresa, 4.4 Pearl Street, Leominster, Mass. 

Gassical ; Leominster High School ; Y. W. C. A ; Executive Committee of Wachusett Qub^ 
'97-*98; Qass Basket Ball Team, '97-*99. 

Ober, Ethel Clarke, S A, 41 Main Street, Foxcrojt, Me. 

Gassical ; Foxcroft Academy ; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association ; Glee Gub, ^96-'97 ; Execu- 
tive Committee of Gass, '97 -'98. 

Paterson, Kate Elizabeth, 144 Drummond Street, Montreal, Canada. 

Literary ; Private School, Montreal ; Y. W C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; 
College Basket Ball Team, '96-^97 ; '99 Gass Basket Ball Team, '96- '98 ; Treasurer of '99, 
'9«)-'96 ; Vice-President of '99, '96-*97 ; Editor of Mount Holyoke, '97-'98. 

Potter, Estelle, -i' 6 X, Applecroft, Worcester, Mass. 

Literary; Worcester High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
President of Gass, *96-*97 ; Executive Committee of League, '98-'99. 

Roberts, Amy Sarah, Hanot'er, N. H. 

Literary ; Kimball Union Academy; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association ; Seaetary of Granite 
State Gub, •97-*9H. 

Robinson, Mary Ix)uisa, S A, Vienna, Va. 

Classical ; Cambridge Latin School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of Athletic Associa- 
tion, '97-*98 ; Lectureship Committee, '96- '98. 

Rodgers, Anna Hendricks, "9 £1, j6 Livingstone Avenue, Albany, N. Y. 

Classical ; Albany High School ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; Gass 
Basket Ball Team, '96- '99 ; Secretary of Empire State Gub, *96-'97 ; Treasurer of Golf Gub, 
'97-98 ; Assistant Business Manager of Mount Holyoke, '97-'98 ; Business Manager, '98- '99. 

Sanborn, Faith, Woodstock, Conn. 

Literary ; Torrington High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Sargent, Florence Gertrude, 2' 6 X, j8 Grove Street, Putnam, Conn. 

Classical ; Putnam High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association ; 
Treasurer of Gass, '97-'98 ; Business Manager of Llamarada, '98-'99. 

Schlotzer, Bertha Maria, Gowanda, N. Y. 

Literary; Gowanda High School ; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society. 

Smith, Laura Elizabeth, 10 Loivell Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Literary ; Montpelier High School ; Y. W. C. A ; Debating Society ; Athletic Association. 

Smith, Tirzah Snell, /po Main Street, Easthampton, Mass. 

Classical; Newton High School; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society; Athletic Association; 
Mendelssohn Club, '96-*98 ; Class Historian. '96-'97 ; Executive Committee of Gass, '98-'99. 

Storrs, Marion, Mansfield Center, Conn. 

Scientific ; Willimantic High School ; Y. W. C. A . ; Debating Society. 

44 



Sweetser, Adelaide Estelle, /^p Pleasant Street, Saco, Me. 

Classical ; Entered Sophomore from bates College ; Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Execu- 
tive Committee of Pine Tree Club, '97-*98 ; Glee Club, '98- '99. 

Taber, Sarah Pearl. Holyoke, Mass. 

Classical ; Holyoke High School. 

Teel, Winifred Ross, Wells Beach, Me. 

Literary ; Hartford High School ; Y. W. C. A. ; President of Pine Tree Club, '97-98. 

Turner, Edith Olive, Coventry, Conn. 

Literary ; Rockville High School ; Y. W. C A.; Debating Society. 

Tuxbury, Emma Louise, ij6 Portland Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Literary ; Haverhill High School ; Y. W. C. A. 

Wade, Edith Sutliflfe, Ventoy, N. V. 

Literary ; Albany High School ; Debating Society. 

Waite, Bertha Belle, 1' 6 X, Adams, N. V. 

Literary ; Adams Collegiate Institute ; Y. W. C. A.; Athletic Association ; Chairman of Class, 
1896 ; Banjo Club, '96- '99 ; Executive Committee of Empire State Qub, '97-*98; Leader of 
Mandolin Gub, '98-'99. 

Waite, Wilhelmina Louise, 2p Shepherd Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Gassical; Girls' Latin^ Boston ; Y. W. C. A.; Debating Society. 

Warner, Edyth Welles, S d, jo6 West Main Street, Jackson, Mich. 

Literary ; Jackson High School , Y. W. C. A. ; Athletic Association ; Secretary and Treasurer 
of We Westerners, '98-'99; Executive Committee of Class, '98-'99. 

Webber, Grace Ethel, Monson, Mass. 

Gassical ; Monson Academy ; Y. W. C. A. 

Webster, Maud Eleanor, 128 Franklin Street, Westfield, Mass. 

Literary ; Entered Sophomore from Oberlin ; Y. W. C. A. ; Debating Society. 

Welles, Marie Wolcott, I S X, 27 Cedar Street^ Taunton, Mass. 

Scientific ; Taunton High School ; Vice-President of Y. W. C. A., •98-'99; Debating Society ; 
Athletic Association ; Executive Committee of Gass, '96 '97 ; Banjo Club, '96- '99 ; President 
of Gass, '98-'99. 

Williams, Elizabeth, ^ ft, 216 Cedar Street, Corning, N. Y. 

Literary ; Entered Junior Irom Lake Erie Seminary ; Y. W. C. A. ; Executive Committee of 
Empire State Gub, '98- '99. 

Wood well, Eva Cecilia, i6j(^ Park Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Gassical ; Sandwich High School, Sandwich, Mass.; Y. W. C. A. 

45 



FORMER MEMBERS 



Alderman, Etta S., 
Allen, Dora M., 
Bailey, Mary A.^ 
Barton, Eva R., 
Davis, Kathertne, 
Dodge, Harriet H., 
Edmands, Lillian R., 
Evans, Helen 
Evans, Nannie J., 
Fenton, Elizabeth L , 
Hunt, Charlotte, 
Kenney, Ivah L., 
Ketcham, Bessie B., 
Mandeville, Julia R., 
Mudge, Mary B., . 
Northrop, Ola M., 
OuvER, Eleanor T , 
Parsons, Sylvia B., 
Perry, Mabelle J., 
PiNNEY, Bertha M., 
Prescott, Maria B., 
Rose, Lavinia S., 
Seward, Myra, 
Stewart, Alice M., 
Wadhams, Mary H., 
Wood, Helen C, 



Chicopie, Mass, 

Adamst N. Y. 

Lawrenci, Mass, 

Stomkam, Mass. 

Brighton, (Mass. 

Hydi Park, Mass. 

IVisiboro, Mass. 

Circlevilli, Ohio. 

Troy, Ohio. 

JatMsiown, N. Y. 

Chappaqua, N. Y. 

. MUfird, N. H. 

'Brooklyn, N. Y. 

East Orangi, N. J 

Danvifs dnUr, Mass, 

Palmer, Mass. 

tVisifiild, N. J. 

Conway, (Mass, 

Springfifld^ (Mass. 

IVatirhury, Conn. 

Jamaica Plain, (Mass, 

Granvillt, (Mass. 

Putnam, Conn. 

Hophinton, (Mass. 

Goshm, Conn. 

IVist Uhanon, N. H. 



46 




Motto ; Lifting better up to best. 
Colors: Green and gold. 
Yell : Fin de sihle^ sihle^ sihle^ 

Fin de sihle are %ve. 
Nineteen hufidred, nineteen hundred^ 

Holyoke! Century! 
Flower : Buttereup and fern. 



CLASS SONG 




£i: 



IjLli M.lli'r 



T > A t ,Kb 




t*y 



t*y W 



■ ii^ '^alf;,uv^lr tUji^Wt' 




K^^iK'\iiiS \H\k^ ^ 'H%\% 




A, l l^..' i^, fi,i 1 r.f ^fi, .if.' fVi ii^i'iin 



■ B#«««i 



r«c 



r3^ 

MM ■ IM* feWI 



ai«d Ml • tby rate*, for kcr. 



'fjf'M'^:jjH^-tii^'Hiii 





T 



RIPITY-TRIP, to the hall they skipped, 

To meet the jolly Juniors. 
A telephone bell did jingle well, 

And much amused the listeners. 

Some were nimble, 

Some were tall. 

But all helped win the basket ball. 

All Noughty-One to Pearsons" did run, 

To make molasses candy. 
When they reached the spot the night was too hot. 

To pull it was not handy.* 

Five brave maids of Holyoke 
Sailed the sea in a boat ; 
If the other side had been stronger 
My short story had been longer. 

•DeflBltloa of b«ndr takan tram ■ dictlorurr not jrtt pnbllihed. 



Hey diddle-diddle, banjo and fiddle 

Twanged in the minstrel show, 
Every one laughed to see such sport. 

Nobody wished to go. 

Brigham*s sad somber spirits sang several sober solemn songs. 

Look, look, a Proverb book ! 

Folk of the olden time pass by. 
Some as men and some as maids. 

And one an abb^ spry. 

There was a jolly club, it sang a jolly lay. 

It met some jolly maidens, then went its jolly way. 

Soph 'more. Soph* more, let each one state 
How many points should win debate. 
One hundred five, that's not too rough, 
Though Freshmen say it*s not enough. 




52 



OFFICERS 



TnsiiUnt, 

yics-PnsidiMt, 

Sicniatyf, 

TuasufiTf 

Historian, 

SifgianUai'Arms^ 



FLORENCE MAY PHILLIPS. 

FLORENCE EMILY WILDER. 

HELEN COX BOWERMAN. 

ETHELYN LUELLA HULL. 

ANNABEL CATHERINE ROE. 

IRMA CLARISSA WIEAND. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



GRACE STEVENS CLARK, 
MARGARET SERVICE STEEN, 



ANNE THOMPSON HAMILTON, 
FRANCES ELIZABETH MAY. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

FRANCES S. SMITH, A.B., MARGUERITE SWEET, Ph.D., 

PROFESSOR WILLIAM C. HAMMOND. 

MEMBERS 

Aitkin, Margaret Fleming, C, . . Woodstock^ Vt. 

Aldan, Ida Grace, L., . jj Lafayette Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Alden^ Rose, L., . ^/p Center Street, Orange, N. J. 

Ammidown, Eva Blossom, S., 4J41 Washington Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

Annis, Lena Elizabeth, L., . 20 Pine Street, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Babbitt, Florence Evelyn, C, 16 Bishop Street, St. Albans, Vt. 

Bacon, Grace Mabel, L., . 18 Merrick Avenue, Springfield, Mass. 

Baldwin, Marjorie Elizabeth, L., j 8 School Street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Bancroft, Georgia Mabel, L., 4. 1-2 Hammond Street, Webster, Mass. 
Barron, Rena Emma, C, 126 South Main Street, South Gardner, Mass. 

Barton, Eva Ruth, L., . Stoneham, Mass. 

Bates, Anna Lincoln, L., . . Windham, Conn. 

Berry, Mary Florence, C, . 12 Charles Street, Portland, Me. 

Bettes, Emily Lucretia, L., 127 Thompson Street, Springfield, Mass. 

Bigelow, Amy Wood worth. C, 2^ Rockmaple Street, Norwood, Mass. 



53 



Bliss, Edith Georgianna, L., 
Boa, Caroline Agnes, L., 
Bowerman, Helen Cox, C, 
Bright, Mary Elsie, L., 
Burnap, Ellen Lucinda, L., 
Burnham, Ellen Caroline, C, 
Chapman, Florence Maria, L., 
Chase, Laura L., . 
Clark, Grace Stevens, C, 
Clarke, Josephine Auguste, C, 
Cole, Jean Dean, C, 
Comstock, Jane, L., 
Copeland, Jennie Freeman, L., 
Cossitt, Sara Catherine, L., 
Covell, Emily Louise, L., 
Crawford, Nellie May, C, 
Cunningham, Helen, L., 
Davenport, Alice Gertrude, C, 
Demarest, Sarah Forsyth, L., 
Dudley, Sophia, L., 
Dyson, Harriette Zelda, L., 
Ellis, Gertrude Catherine, S., 
Evans, Nannie Jeflferson, L., 
Fairbanks, Cornelia Taylor, L., 
Farwell, Minnie Gregory, C, 
Foxcroft, Faith, L., 
Gay, Eva Berthoud, C, 
Gilbert, Mabel Riedelle, S., 
Goodenough, Gertrude Lillian, L., 
Goodnow, Jessie Emeline, L., 
Griffin, Bertha Louise, L., ig 

Hall, Katherine Woodberry, L., 
Hamilton, Anne Thompson, L., . 
Hapgood, Susie Loraine, L., 
Harmon, Helen, C, 



10 Congress Street^ Worcester^ Mass. 

Kings ley y Iowa, 

p Joslyn Parky Rochester^ N. Y. 

Central Street y Frankliny Mass. 

?o A list on Place y Fitchburgy Mass. 

North Windham^ Conn. 

Saybrooky Conn. 

j()8 Walnut Street y Holyokey Mass. 

. t Farmingtony Conn. 

Linwoody Mass. 
J I Ten Brook Street y Albany y N. Y. 

Ballston Spay N. Y. 

JO Main Street y Mansfield y Mass. 

^5 Broad Street y Claremofity N. H. 

Glastonburyy Conn. 

35 Prospect Street y WarsaWy N. Y. 

2 J Lincoln Avenue y Cadiz y Ohio. 

North Graftony Mass. 

24.0 State Street y Hackensacky N. J. 

. North Guilfordy Conn. 

SS Franklin Street, Westfieldy Mass. 

12§ Winchester Streety Keeney N. H. 

Troyy Ohio. 

St. Johttsburyy Vt. 

55 Oak Streety Hyde Parky Mass. 

2^ Hillside Avenue y Cambridge y Mass. 

Winter Street, Norwoody Mass, 

Middletowny Conn. 

Winchester CeftteTy Conn. 

East Jeffrey y N. H. 

Washington Avenue y Winthropy Mass. 

62 Gardner Street, Allistony Mass. 

State CollegCy Penn. 

Peruy Vt. 

Lincoln Streety Somersworthy N. H. 



54 



Harris, Lucy Gerrish, L., 
Hazen, Harriet Matilda, C, 
Hazen, Lucia Washburn, L., 
Hill, Florence, C, 
Hirst, Clara Adele, C, 
Hoffmeier, Mary Katherine, C, 
Horton, Lily Elno, 
Hull, Ethelyn Luella, C, 
Jackson, May Stone, L., 
Judd, Mabel Louise, L., 
Kee, Olive Allan, L., 
Keenan, Margaret Frances, L., 
Kendall, Jane Louise, C, 
Kenney, Ivah Louise, L., 
Kenyon, Ruth Sabin, C, 
Langendorf, Elizabeth Schurch, L., 
Leavitt, Caroline Frances, 
Lewis, Edith Emily, L., 
Linter, Maude Clarice, L., 
Locke, Florence Esther, L., 
Lyman, Bertha Holland, L., 
Lyman, Helen Mowry, S., 
Mason, Emmaline Elona, 
Mason, Mary Belden, C, 
Matthews, Helen Lois, L., 
May, Frances Elizabeth, 
McDonald, Gertrude Eleanor, L., 
McKinney, May C, 
Merchant, Effie Parkhurst, L., 
Merwin, Florence Sophia, L., 
Moore, Anna Hedden, C, 
Moore, Sara Elizabeth, C, 
Morse, Lillian Eliza, C, 
Newton, Alice Bertha, L., 
Oakley, Mary Forrest, C, 



p<? High Street^ Ipswich^ Mass. 

2j6 College Street^ Middletown^ Conn. 

. 2y6 College Street^ Middletowny Conn. 

7^ Maplewood Avenue, Pit ts field , Mass. 

jj6 Oakland Avenue, Katisas City, Kan. 

Mt. Pleasant, Md. 
. 16/1.4. C Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Madison, Conn. 

1^2 Main Street, Keene, N. H. 

14 Pleasant Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

po West Eagle Street, East Boston, Mass. 

625 Norfolk Street, Mattapan, Mass. 

I East Street, Weymouth Heights, Mass. 

40 Elm Street, Milford, N. H, 

39 Grove Street, Putnam, Conn. 

312 Linden Street, Camden, N. J. 

JO Adams Street, Somerville, Mass. 

143 Cortland Street, Jackson, Mich. 

Fort Plain, N. Y. 

ISO West Bartlctt Street^ Brockton, Mass, 

134 Hanover, Fall River, Mass, 

West Brookfield, Mass. 

157 Pi^^^ Street, Fall River, Mess. 

Suffield, Cotm. 
406 North 32nd Street, Philadelphia, Pcnn. 

Lee, Mass, 

Reedsville, Pemt. 

East Orange, N. J, 

29 Commonwealth Avenue, Gloucester, Mass. 

New Milford, Conn, 

2^ State Street, Lotuville, N. Y, 

i6j Central Street, Gardiner, Me. 

^7^ Washington Street, Norwood, Mass. 

21s Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

2JJ AfcDonough Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



55 



Ogden, Anna Laura, S., 
O'Hara, Annie Pierce, L., 
Oliver, Eleanor Taylor, L. , 
Osgood, Ethel Stirling, L., 
Parsons, Louise Rockwell, C, 
Perry, Mabelle Jeanne, C, 
Phillips, Florence May, C, 
Potwin, Elizabeth Bartlett, C, 
Reed, Edith Huntington, S., 
Reynolds, Julia Curtiss, C, 
Rising, Laura Pratt, L., 
Roe, Annabel Catherine, C, 
Rogers Ella Charlotte, C, 
Rogers, Florence Abbie, C, 
Rose, Lavinia Sophia, C, 
Roundy, Susan Pulsipher, C, 
Russell, Rowena Mary, C, 
Shaw, Ethel Elizabeth, L., 
Sheffield, May Elizabeth, 
Smith, Anne May, L., 
Smith, Bertha Eleanor, S., 
Smith, Mittie Jameson, L., 
Southworth, Emma Reid, C, 
Spencer, Celia May, L., 
Steen, Margaret Service, L., 
St. John, Anna Edith, L., 
Stocking, Ethel, C, 
Swenarton, Grace, L., 
Thomas, Ruth Louise, C, 
Warren, Mabel Frances, C, 
Watson, Susie Augusta, L., . 
Watts, Helen Louise, C, 
Whipple, Caroline Almira, C, 
White, Marian Elizabeth, C, 
Whitney, Frederica May, C, 



Pen Van, N. Y. 

Winthrop^ Mass. 

West field, N. J. 

48 Winter Street, Partlandy Me, 

Lenox, Mass. 

4^ Church Street, Springfield, Mass. 

211 Holland Street, West Somerville, Mass. 

East Windsor, Conn. 

S4 Court Street, West field, Mass. 

21 J South Main Street, St. Albans, Vt. 

West Pawlet, Vt. 

J Dix Street, Worcester, Mass. 

80 Asylum Street, Norwich, Conn. 

Hingham Center, Mass. 

Granville, Mass. 

Rockingham, Vt. 

1 8 Central Street, Winchendon, Mass. 

South Amherst, Mass. 

Penacook, N. H. 

East St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

South Hculley, Mass. 

Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Fearing Road, Hingham, Mass. 

West Burke, Vt. 

401 North jjrd Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 

J I Rut ledge Avenue, Springfield, Mass. 

Williamstown Station, Mass. 

16^ Union Street, Montclair, N. J. 

20 Home Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Leicester, Mass. 

Winchendon, Mass. 

West Barnet, Vt. 

Sutton, Mass. 

45 Chatham Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Greendale, Mass. 



56 



Wieand, Irma Clarissa, L. , 
Wilder, Florence Emily, L.,. 
Wilson, Minnie Adams, L., 
Wise, Mary Cornelia, L., 
Wood, Helen Adelaide, L., 
Wood, Helen Clough, C, 



2 op Chestnut Street, Pottstown, Penn. 
2JJ West y4th Street^ New York City. 

North Amherst, Mass. 

8 Lewis Street, Auburn, N. K 

4. Gleason Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

West Lebanon, N. H. 



FORMER MEMBERS 



Adams, Aones Eliza, C, 
Aldrich, Mbrtoi Mai, L, 
Armimgton, Edith Wood, L., 
Beu, Aucb Haklow, C, 
Beu. Frances Fribman, C, 
Brown, Edith Abigail, L., 
Chambbrs, Aonbs Eleanor, L., 
Dack, Ethel Margaret, C, 
Deacon, Laura L., 
Garbtson, Katherine G., C, 
Glenn, Anna Low, C, 
Harris, Clara Jane, C, 
Hbaley, Elizabeth P., L., 
HiooiNS, Edith Carlton, C, 
Horton, Lily Elno, L , 
Kbrshaw, Polly, L., 
Klein, Margaret A., C, 
LiAviTT, Caroline Frances, C, 
Mason, Emmiline Elona, L., 
Phippb, Winu^rbd Williams, L., 
Pierce, Ethel Rosetta, L., 
Roswell, Edith, C, 
Sargent, Jbnnie Vylena, C, 
ScoLUY, Mary Evelyn, L., 
Skinnbr, Florence C, S., 
Stbinir, Bbss Elaine, C, 
Whitcomb, Nina May, L., 



H^alla H^alla, l^ash, 

Hallowill Mt. 

iVorcisUr, Mass. 

Bristol R. I. 

Granhy^ Mass. 

iVinthrop, Mass. 

facksoHvilU, III. 

East Tiacham, yt, 

Cidar Rapids, la. 

Kirkwood, Mo. 

Elixahith, N. J. 

So, Amherst, Mass. 

Bridgewater, Mass. 

Omaha, Nth. 

Cidar Rapids, la. 

IVist BoyUUm, Mass. 

Hancock, N. Y. 

Somervilli, (Mass. 

Fall River, tMass. 

Prospect, Conn. 

St. Johnsbury, yt. 

tendons, N. H. 

fVest Boylston, Mass, 

Hofyoke, tMass. 

Pkillipsburg, N.J. 

fVestfield, Mass. 

Claremont, N. H. 



57 




Motto : Tt9 t6 r^poaOev. 

Colors : WAiU and hunters^ green. 

Yell : Oski — wow — wow^ 

Wiski — wow — wow^ 
Holy — muckle — i, 
Holy — oke y — i, 
Naughty — one y — i^ 
Wow — wow — wow. 
Flower : White rose. 



T 



CLASS SONG 

Tune: ''Tramp, Tramp, Tramp."' 

HERE'S a banner that shall float 
As the emblem of the brave, 
And forever more by loyalty made bright 
Ever in the foremost rank 
Shall its colors skyward wave, 
'Tis the banner of our class, the green and white ! 

Chorus: 

Nineteen-One, O Alma Mater, 

Pledges loyal love to thee. 
And whatever the years may bring, 
Thine, the praise our lips shall sing ; 

Thine, our songs and hearts and lives shall ever be. 

58 



Work we now within these walls 

For the honor of our class ; 
And when all our happy college days are done, 
Though to larger life and work 

Joyfully we then shall pass, 
Still our love shall first be thine, O Nineteen-One: 

Years may pass and changes come ; 
Far apart our paths may lead, 
But this banner nevermore will we forget. 
And our thoughts will backward fly 
Over hill and vale and mead, 
To where Holyoke 'mid the steadfast hills is set. 




59 




"A^ 



ND who are these ? " asked old Father Time glancing in grave 
surprise off the Mary Lyon Year Book as a throng of maidens 
burst out of Williston Hall. " Metfainks I never saw them 
before." 

" Nay," said the college sprite. "At thy last visit they were not 
here. They are the Freshmen coming from their class-meeting." 
Suddenly she covered her ears and shivered as a confuited sound like the 
babel of many loud voices pierced them. " O that they would yell 
together ! " she gasped. 

" Tell me about these Freshmen," said the sage. " But stay," he 
added, consulting his ancient time-piece, "make thy tale short — a mere 
comprehensive outline without detail for in two minutes my electric 
car goes." 

" 'Twould be hard to make it cover more than two minutes," replied 
the sprite. " They come from far and near, and straightway conquering 
their bashfulness, they called a class-meeting at which those awful yells 
were made " — another shiver convulsed her frame — " and at which they 
chose their color. What color ? Crimson of course. Green would 



i 



»^ 




never do, for the Sophomores were that. How bravely that crimson 
floated over them on Boat Race Day ! Even the flag-pole, the tall, 
slippery flag-pole flaunted a red banner above the exciting fray at its 
foot. And down by the lake in breathless silence the crowd watched 
the frail barks glide over the choppy waves and round the distant stake. 
Ah ! 'twas a noble sight." 

**Did they win the race?** demanded Time. The sprite sadly 
shook her head. ** Then waste no more idle words upon it. Hasten !*' 

** Then came the picnic,** pursued the sprite. **They sang simple 
ditties, played such games as suited their tender years, partook of 
country fare and went home to slumber early. And now, now I come 
to their crowning glory, their debate. Ah ! had our country such wise 
heads in Cabinet and Senate, Indian bureaus and their troubles would 
be no more, and experts would hide their heads in shame. Did they 
win the debate ? Of course ! ** 

'* Ha ! ha ! " roared old Time, rubbing his hands in glee. ** They 
cheer my old heart ! One day they shall be famous, for they shall — '* 

Suddenly a whizzing, whirring sound penetrated the open chapel- 
door and old Father Time, wrapped his surtout closely round him and 
with seven rapid strides, boarded the electric car, leaving his sentence 
but just begun like the history of Nineteen-Two. 




61 



OFFICERS 



Pnsident, 

yici'T resident J 

Secretary, 

Treasurer f 

Historian, 

Serge a nt-at- Arms , 



ALICE ROLLINS LITTLE. 

GRACE MARGARET WHITTIMORE. 

MARY LUCY OSGOOD. 

MARY JANETTE MARSH. 

RACHEL FLORENCE RILEY. 

FRANCES AUGUSTINE MORGAN. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



MARY CATHARINE ASHTON, 
ETHEL COLLINGWOOD HALL, 



EDITH KIMBALL PARTRIDGE, 
ELIZABETH JEANETTE ALEXANDER. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

GRACE BIGELOW BAKER, MARY GILMORE WILLIAMS, Ph D. 

MEMBERS 

Adams, Eliza Ann Steele, . . East Peacham, Vt. 

Agard, Marian Bissell, . . . Tolland^ Conn. 

Aldrich, Abbie Elizabeth, . . East Douglas^ Mass. 

Aldrich, Maude, .... Monson, Mass. 

Alexander, Elizabeth Jeanette, j 121 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 



Allen, Clare Jean, 
Allen, Gertrude Salisbury, 
Andrews, Clara Sidney, 
Ash ton, Mary Catharine, 
Barnum, Rebecca Bough ton, 
Barry, Anna Esther, 
Belding, Josephine, 
Bell, Alice Harlow, 
Bell, Alice Morrison, 
Bishop, Emily Rosalie, 



Peterboro, N. H. 

Longmeadow, Mass. 

no Logan Street, Brazil, Ind. 

74. North 4th Street, Easton, Pa. 

216 Walnut Street, Montclair, N. J. 

2^1 Walnut Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

1^4 She It on Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 

JJ2 Hope Street, Bristol, R. I. 

26 Haverhill Street, Andover, Mass. 

ijj Cross Street, Keene, N. H. 



62 



Blanchard, Nellie Preston, 
Brigham, Elizabeth, 
Brock, Mae Ellis, . 
Brock way, Ruth Hubbell, 
♦Bryant, Edith Helen, 
Burbank, Grace Beckwith, 
Caskey, Jane Guild, 
Cole, Susan Blanche, 
Cook, Elsie Gertrude, 
Cowell, Florence Augusta, 
Cowles, Frances Griffin, 
Crane, Alice May, 
Daniels, Edith Lyman, 
Davies, Annie Margaret, 
Davies, Mildred Cordelia, 
Davis, Florence Idella, 
Deacon, Laura, 
Derby, Alice Harriet, . 
Deyo, Ida Elizabeth, 
Disbrow, Emilie Mead, 
Dodd, Victoria Christina, 
Dodds, Lillian Agnes, 
Doyle, Mary Marguerite, 
Fisher, Kate Searle, 
Frazier, Katharine Maria, 
Fulton, Helena May, 
Garland, Gertrude Carolyn, 
Gates, Edith, 
Gates, Helen Chapin, 
Gilchrist, Beth Bradford, 
Gilman, Grace Adfele, . 
Gilman, Louise Roxana, 
Gleason, Bertha Louise, 
Gordon, Lilian, 



Ascutneyville, Vt. 

1016 Wesley Avenue, Evansion, 111, 

7 Gordonia Road, Sotnerville, Mass, 

2j8 North Main Street, Gloversvtlle, N. Y, 

Egypt, Mass. 

Longmeadow, Mass, 

14.3 Speedwell Aveiiue, Morristown, N,J, 

Lebanon, N, H, 

Shrewsbury, Mass, 

Ashburnham, Mass, 

Maple Avenue, Norfolk, Conn, 

Ludlow, Vt, 

Ipswich, Mass, 

ly East Washington Street, Rutland, Vt, 

pj Easton Avenue, New Brunswick, A^, J, 

2^ Elm Street, Webster, Mass, 

lojj First Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 

28 High Street, Ludlow, Vt, 

Honeoye, N, Y, 

New Rochelle, N, Y. 

Ponce, Porto Rico, 

17 1 ^Winooski Avenue, Burlington, Vt. 

2j6 West Hampden, Holyoke, Mass. 

East Onondaga, N, Y, 

124 Division Street, Amsterdam, N, Y, 

2op West lo^th Street, New York City. 

66y Main Street, Worcester, Mass, 

1234 i6th Street, Washington, D, C. 

I2j^ 16th Street, Washington, D, C. 

jg Center Street, Rutland, Vt. 

West Fairlee, Vt. 

Foxcroft, Me. 

10 Randall Street, Worcester, Mass. 

666 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



•Died Oct 15, z8gB. 



63 



Grice, Lilian Anna, 
Gridley, Bessie Marie, 
Gulick, Elizabeth Marian, 
Gysbers, Bertha De Bruyn, 
Hall, Ethel CoUingwood, 



s6oy Bartmer Street^ St. Louisy Mo, 

South Hadleyy Mass, 

Biarritz^ France, 

Guttenberg P. O. , Woodcliffe, N. /. 

281 Bay less Avenue, St, Anthony Park^ Minn, 



Hall, Florence Maria, y 8 East First North Street, Salt Lake City^ Utah. 



Hallock, Margaret Sutheriand, 
Hammond, Elsie Rebecca, 
Hamson, Amy, 
Hamson, Blanche, 
Haynes, Alice Laura, 
Hellyar, Blanche Elizabeth, 
Heywood, Mary Ethel, 
Hitt, Cora May, 
Hitt, Jessie, 
Hoffnagle, Edna May, 
Hollands, Sarah Truair, 
Holmes, Ruth Davenport, 
Hopkins, Helen, 
Howard, Kate Gertrude, 
Hoyt, Abby Louise, 
Hull, Grace Burtonia, . 
Jelliffe. Elizabeth May, 
Johnson, Helen Louise, 
Kelsey, Anna Florence, 
Keyes, Rowena Keith, 
Ladd, Leona Elizabeth, 
Lane, Suzan Davis, 
Leavitt, Charlotte Elizabeth, 
Leavitt, Helen Sewell, 
Little, Alice Rollins, 
Lord, Harriet Carmelite, 
Lull, Bessie Thomas, 
MacWilliams, Jessie Anna, 
Madison, Ida Sybil, 



7jd North sth Street, Steubenville, Ohio, 

Fishkill'On-Hudson, N, Y, 

jt6 Dalaware Street, Syracuse, N, Y, 

J16 Delaware Street, Syracuse, N, Y. 

826 First Place, Plainfield, N. J. 

2^ Thorndike Street, Painter, Mass, 

7 J if. West Main Street, Jackson, Mich, 

Da It on, Mass, 
Church Street, Mittineague, Mass, 

Willsborough, N, Y. 

18 i/fih Street, Watervliet, N, Y. 

310 joth Avenue S,, Seattle, Wash, 

610 Cambridge Street, Allston, Mass, 

Chase Avenue, Webster, Mass, 

JJ5 Lincoln Street, Worcester, Mass, 

East River, Conn, 

J2I Stuyt^esant Avenue, Brooklyn, N, Y, 

lojy Washington Street, Bath^ Me. 

14 Wall Street, Claremont, N, H, 

2j Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N, Y, 

15 Florence Street, Springfield, Mass, 

J 86 Rua da Consolagao, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 

JO Adams Street, Somerville, Mass. 

ijy Greene Street, Melrose Highlands, Mass, 

40 High Street, Auburn^ Me, 
86 Ames Street, Lawrence^ Mass, 

Windsor^ Vt, 

5/ Avon Street, New Haven, Conn, 

21 Forest Street^ Montclair, N, J, 



64 



Marsh, Mary Janette, 
McClary, Lucy Smith, . 
Melvin, Kathleen, 
Messer, Florence Belle, 
Middleton, Elizabeth Hall, 
Morgan, Frances Augustine, 
Newkirk, Lilla Jeannette, 
Newton, Florence Beatrice, 
Osborne, Delphine, 
Osgood, Mary Lucy, 
Parsons, Nellie Ellsworth, 
Partridge, Edith Kimball, 
Peck, Edith Warren, 
Peck, Harriet Rosa, 
Perkins, Eva Salome, 
Perkins, Fanny Cora, 
Peters, Amy Flora, 
Pierson, Mary Elizabeth, 
Pilling, Maud Wheaton, 
Polk, Florence Kirk, 
Porter, Helen, 
Prescott, Maria Beardslee, 
Quirk, Mary Magdalene, 
Raymond, Bertha Irene, 
Razee, Ruth Elizabeth, 
Reed, Fanny Whiting, 
Reed, Mallian Marie, 
Regestein, Elsa Wilhelmina, 
Riley, Rachel Florence, 
Roberts, Angle Bailey, 
Robertson, Edith Frances, 
Rogers, Elizabeth Caldwell, 
Root, Sara Browning, 
Roper, Hannah Louise, 
Russell, Helen Gertrude, 



7^5 Spring Street, Springfieldy Mass. 

Windsor, Vt. 

Derry, N. H. 

• 57^9 Washington Street, Chicago, III. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

4.08 Franklin Street, Johnstown, Penn. 

, 22p Main Street, Easthampton, Mass. 

21 s Main Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

p Main Street, Monson, Mass. 
I if. First Avenue, Montpelier, Vt. 

Enfield, Conn. 

112 State Street, Augusta, Me. 

North Bennington, Vt. 

jj Prospect Street, Gloversville, N. Y. 

4.8 Franklin Street, Peabody, Mass. 

107 Austin Street, Worcester, Mass. 

22 Bramhall Street, Portland, Me. 
18 Wareham Street, Medford, Mass. 

' 55^ Warren Avenue, Brockton, Mass. 

Kennett Square, Penn. 

Williamsburg, Mass. 

28 Baylston Terrace, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

2^4. Linden Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

S Hollis Place, Allston, Mass. 

^jp Edgewood Avenue, New Haven, Conn. 

5 Sycamore Street, Worcester, Mass. 

yo School Street, Gardiner, Me. 

^2 Wiman Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

21 j^ Main Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

24. Bay Street, Springfield, Mass. 

I S3 Belmont Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 

Colchester, Conn, 
p Pleasant Street, Amherst, Mass. 

Barre, Mass. 
I2p Trenton Street, East Boston, Mass. 



65 



Searle, Clarissa Belle, 
Sherman, Gertrude Eliza, 
Sinclair, Helen Melora, 
Sleeper, Harriett Augusta, 
Smith, Grace Trowbridge, 
Smith, Lillian Exine, 
Smith, Ruth Alma, 
Spicer, Elsie Eusebia, 
Stanley, Carrie Bishop, 
Stevenson, Harriet Janet, 
Storrs, Harriet Asenath, 
Stowell, Louise Pay son, 
Swinington, Charlotte Capron 
Talladay, Mary Eliza, 
Thomas, Ruth, 
Thresher, Annie Hayward, 
Thresher, Mabel Susan, 
Thurston, Isabel Storey, 
Tillinghast, Clara Berissa, 
Turner, Laura Giddings, 
Tuttle, Jennie Luella, 
Vaughn, Jessie May, 
Wallace, Edith Maynard, 
Wheeler, Mary Louise, 
Whittemore, Grace Margaret, 
Wild, Edith Richardson, 
Williams, Annie lola, 
Williams, Genevieve, 
Woodward, Alice, 
Woodward, Marion, 



Norwich^ Conn. 

Hanover^ N. H. 

4. North Avenue^ Worcester , Mass. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Longtneadaw, Mass. 

Sunderlandy Afass. 

J J Carroll Street, Worcester, Mass. 

North Winfield, N. Y. 
Nahant, Mass. 
I Monroe Place, Portland, Me. 
/f.2 South Main Street, Hanover, N. H. 

St ought on, Mass. 

^p North Main Street, Rutland, Vt. 

7 West lake Avenue, Auburn, N, Y. 

La Grange, Mo. 
126 Broadway, Norwich, Conn. 
126 Broadway, Norwich, Conn. 

Whitinsville, Mass, 

Vernon, Conn. 

Housatonicy Mass. 

55 High Street, Neponset, Boston, Mass. 

j^ Warren Street, Norwich, Conn. 

J5 Orange Street, Nashua, N, H. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
i^i Main Street, Andover, Mass, 

Billerica, Mass. 

Peacham, Vt. 

5 School Street, Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Lexington, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 



66 




Motto : Beop stapolfaeste. 

Color : Crimson. 

Yell : Hoorahl Hoorah! Ricky ^ ticky^ ta waf 

Williky wolliky, Holyoke — oliky! 

Wah hoo^ bah zoo, 

Holyoke, Holyoke, 1^02! 
Flower : Jacqueminot rose. 



CLASS SONG 

IN the mighty band of pilgrims 
That is pressing ever on 
By the beaten path of learning 

To the goal of Wisdom yon, 
We are marching, while above us, 
With the Holyoke banner blue, 
Floats the crimson badge of courage 
That betokens Nineteen-Two. 

Far beyond us, winding upward. 

Move the forward ranks in line. 
Hear them calling us to follow ! 

See their streaming pennants shine ! 
All around us are the trophies 

Of the deeds that they have done. 
Courage, comrades ! Up, and onward ! 

Win the heights that they have won. 



67 



Well we know that each advancement 

Brings some higher peak in view. 
Time can never end the journey, 

Sturdy hearts of Nineteen-Two. 
But our lives still linked in friendship, 

Heart to heart and soul to soul, 
Shall forever and forever 

Upward tend to wisdom's goal. 



TEACHERS' COURSE 



Charles, Vera Katharine, 
Dyer, Harriet Cornelia, 
Guilford, Nellie May, 
Montgomery, Helen O., 
Noyes, Eva Josephine, 
Pingree, Maud Parepa, 
Read, Effie Alberta 
Shaw, Minnie Whiting, 
Streeter, Rose Louise, 



Washington^ D. C. 

Fair Haven ^ Vt. 

South Ashfieldy Mass. 

401 Crawford Street^ Fort Scott ^ Kansas. 

jy8 Washington Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Hopkinton, Mass. 
12 Grant Street, Haverhill, Mass. 

Marlborough, Vt. 
Bernardston, Mass. 



MUSIC COURSE 

Esleek, Mary Lombard, 183 Northampton Street^ Holyoke, Mass. 

Smith, Harriette Emma, • • . Holyoke, Mass. 

Stapleton, Amelia Mary, . 211 Beach Street, Holyoke, Mass. 

Twenty-seven students in the Academic Department are receiving 
instruction in Music. 



68 



IN MEMORIAM 

EVA FRANCES SMITH was bom in Huntington, N. Y., May 23, 
1877. She died at College, February 5, 1899. Miss Smith's 
childhood days were spent in Huntington, and at the High School 
there she prepared for College. She entered College with the class of 
'98, but, being absent the following year, on her return to College in 
the fall of '97, she became a member of the class of '99. 

She was a member of the Sigma Theta Chi Society, where her 
gentleness of character and earnestness of purpose made her much 
beloved. 

She was an earnest and faithful student with high standards. 
Never too busy to be interrupted, she met every call with unvarying 
cheer and helpfulness. 

Somewhat reserved, she had yet the quiet power which is most far- 
reaching in its influence, and all whose lives have been touched by hers 
would bring a loving tribute to the strength and beauty of her character. 

EDITH HELEN BRYANT died October 15, 1898. She was a 
member of the Freshman class, and for only one month enjoyed 
the College life into which she entered so heartily. Yet even 
within this short time her bright, earnest face won many friends who 
will always think of her lovingly and tenderly. 



69 



^^ 




■^HE introduciion of the dormitory system 
necessarily brought about changes and 
modifications in the College life. Then, 
more than before, was felt the need of some organization in which all 
the students should be united, and of some system of government in 
which they should be placed more explicitly upon their honor. The 
class of '98 presented a plan which was approved by the Faculty, and 
which resulted in the formation of the Students' League. 

This organization, of which all the students in College are mem- 
bers, has for its object "to promote unity and loyalty in the College; 
good feeling between Faculty and students ; to encourage personal 
responsibility among the stndents, and to secure a better carrying out 
of such College rules as shall come under the jurisdiction of the 
League." In this system the League is an executive body, having the 
power to enforce such College regulations as shall become League regu- 
hitions, and such legislative power as the Faculty shall grant to it. 
The final authority rests with the Faculty. 

In meetings of the League not only matters of immediate interest to 
the present student body, but also any movements furthering the ulti- 
mate good of the College are brought up and discussed, the action of 

73 



the Leagfue thus taking the place of class action. Certain College regu- 
lations, such as those in regard to Church and Chapel attendance, are 
now enforced by the League. 

The executive power of this body is vested in a President, who is 
always a Senior, an Executive Committee, composed of members of the 
four classes, and an assistant, who is a recent graduate, and a Com- 
mittee in each of the houses, whose duty it is to assist the Executive 
Committee in carrying out regulations relating to house matters. The 
Executive Committee has power to define the jurisdiction of the League 
subject to its approval, and represents the League with the Standing 
Committee of the Faculty. Through the relations existing between 
these two committees, the students can be kept in close touch with the 
Faculty, and a direct means of communication between the two is pro- 
vided, so that requests may be easily transmitted. 

Although the League has been organized so short a time, the plan 
has been found successful. The students have entered into it with a 
spirit and loyalty worthy of true Mount Holyoke daughters, and have 
shown that they are perfectly united in wishing to do that which is for 
the best interest of their Alma Mater. 



OFFICERS 

Tnsident, ..... SUSAN HELEN DOANE, '99. 

Secretary and Treasurer, .... MINNIE WURTH CRANE, 1900. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

SUSAN HELEN DOANE, '99, Chairman. 
ABBIE HOWE TURNER, A.B., BESSIE BRIGHAM ARMINGTON, 1900, 

BESSIE CLEVELAND SARGENT, '99, FLORENCE MAY PHILLIPS, 1901, 
ESTELLE POTTER, 1900, EVA JOSEPHINE NOYES, 190a. 



74 



^^^^^ounTNo/yok 





Deoatina Sockp/. 




THE Mount Holyoke Debating Society has a two-fold purpose — to 
serve as an honorary society, to which those Seniors and Juniors 
who have attained an average rank of eighty-five per cent, are 
eligible ; and to train its members to speak logically and clearly before a 
critical audience. At the monthly meetings debates are given on social 
and political subjects or College topics. After the debate, at the closed 
meeting, an informal discussion is made the means of parliamentary 
drill, the object of which is to teach quickness of thought and clearness 
of expression. 



OFFICERS 



Pnsideni^ 
Vici'Prnidtnt, 
Sicretary and Treasunr^ 



CLARA LOOMIS STURTEVANT, '99. 
MARIE ISABELLE MATSON, '99. 
MINNIE WURTH CRANE, 1900. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

MARIE ISABELLE MATSON, '99. Chairman 

CARRIE EDNA BLANCH ARD, '99, MABEL AUGUSTA CANADA, 1900, 

ALICE STEVENS DAVIS, '99, BELLE LOUISE MEAD, 1900. 



Carrie Edna Blanchard, 
Eugenie Broeksmit, 
Alice Stevens Davis, 
Fannie L. Dean, 
Susan Helen Doane, 



MEMBERS 

CLASS OF NINETY-NINE 

Anna Louise Mower, 
Amy Augusta Nettleton, 
Carrie Louise Plumb, 
Maria Louise Roraback, 
Bessie Cleveland Sargent, 



75 



Susan Lydia Dow, 
Ella Marion Farrington. 
Ruth Wood Haight, 
Mary Frost Hodgdon, 
Margaret Ursula Magrath, 
Marie Isabelle Matson, 
Caroline Hendley Mendum, 
Lilla Frances Morse, 



Martha Frances Sawyer, 
Katherine Lillian Shearer, 
Janet L. Sinclair, 
Clara Loomis Sturtevant, 
Myra Frances Vickery, 
Bertha L. Whittemore, 
Ethel L. Williams, 
Hide Yegashira. 



CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 



Angeline Peck Adams, 
Ruth Stewart Arnold, 
Margaret Elizabeth Ball, 
Ethel Hannah Bardwell, 
Grace Eldridge Beach, 
Alice Emeline Belcher, 
Essie Winning Boyd, 
Mary Alice Bradford, 
Susan Mary Bradley, 
Alice Seymour Browne, 
Mabel Augfusta Canada, 
Florence Edna Chamberlain, 
Minnie Wurth Crane, 
Clintie Delafield Curtiss, 
Pauline Faye Devereux, 
Ida Marion Dougherty, 
Helen Douglas, 
Isabel Rich Drew, 
Frances Richmond Foster, 
Myrabel Josephine Gould, 
Minnie Almira Graham, 
Eleanor Wilmot Guild, 
Grace Twemlow Hammond, 
Edith Stone Haskell, 



Verena Huntress, 
Susie Mary Jordan, 
Cornelia Emma Juliand, 
Helen Idella Kendall, 
Eleanor Rosannah Kimball, 
Jennie Louise Knight, 
Mabel Edna Masters, 
Belle Louise Mead, 
Louise Celestia Mead, 
Grace HoUister Merwin, 
Bertha Niles Meserve, 
Kate Elizabeth Paterson, 
Estelle Potter, 
Anna Hendricks Rodgers, 
Faith Sanborn, 
Florence Gertrude Sargent, 
Bertha Maria Schlotzer, 
Tirzah Snell Smith, 
Marion Storrs, 
Edith Olive Turner, 
Edith Sutliflfe Wade, 
Wilhelmina Louise Waite, 
Maud Eleanor Webster, 
Marie Wolcott Welles. 



76 



- SIGMA THETA CHI 

1887 

IN FACULTATE 
Grace Bigelow Baker. 

CLASS OF NINETY-NINE 

Florence Elisabeth Clark, Grace Howe McKinley, 

Fanny Dean, *Eva Frances Smith, 

Carolyn Edith Wilson. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 

Angeline Peck Adams, Eleanor Jennings Long, 

Agnes Louise Collins, Estelle Potter, 

Isabel Rich Drew, Florence Gertrude Sargent, 

Susie Loraine Hapgood, Bertha Belle Waite, 

Eleanor Rosannah Kimball, Marie Wolcott Welles. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 

Grace Stevens Clark, Helen Lois Matthews, 

Eva Berthoud Gay, Margaret Service Steene, 

Grace Swenarton. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWO 

Blanche Elizabeth Hellyar, Eva Josephine Noyes, 

Frances Augustine Morgan, Fanny Whiting Reed, 

Grace Margaret Whittemore. 

79 



XI PHI DELTA 

1891 

CLASS OF NINETY-NINE 

Alice Townsend Bidwell, Susan Helen Doane, 

Eugenie Broeksmit, Marie Isabelle Matson, 

Charlotte Louise Partridge. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 

Margaret Elij&abeth Ball, Emily Mulford Miller, 

Ida Marion Dougherty, Ethel Clarke Ober, 

Helen Idella Kendall, Mary Louisa Robinson, 

Emma Jane McLean, Edyth Welles Warner. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 

Laura Deacon, Edith Emily Lewis, 

Sophia Dudley, Emmerline Elona Mason, 

Ruth Sabin Kenyon, Anna Laura Ogden. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWO 

Elizabeth Jeannette Alexander, Mary Ethel Haywood, 

Ethel CoUingwood Hall, Mary Janette Marsh, 

Edith Kimball Partridge, Alice Rollins Little, 

Elizabeth Marian Gulick. 



80 




/^- 



\ 



PSI OMEGA 
1897 

IN FACULTATE 
Mary G. Williams, Ph.D. 

President, Caroline Hendley Mendum 

CLASS OF NINETY-NINE 

Ruth Wood Haight, Clara Frances Mallory, 

Caroline Hendley Mendum, Lilla Frances Morse. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 

Bessie Brigham Armington, Frances Richmond Foster, 

Ruth Stewart Arnold, Edith Stone Haskell, 

Susan Mary Bradley, Anna Hendricks Rogers, 

Alice Seymour Browne, Elizabeth Williams. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 

Rose Alden, Cornelia Taylor Fairbanks, 

Emily Lucretia Bettes, Anne Thompson Hamilton^ 

Jessie Emeline Goodnow, Annabel Catharine Roe. 



85 



BIOLOGICAL CLUB 

Heredity, Dec. 2, '98, C. M. Clapp, Ph.D. 
The Mechanism of Inheritance, 

Dec. 8, C. M. Clapp. 

What is Darwinism ? Feb. 3, '99, C. M. Clapp. 

Bacteriology, Feb. 10, Mary P. Dole, M.D. 
Germ Diseases and Their Treatment, 

March 10, Mary P. Dole, M.D. 

Post Darwinian Questions, C. M. Clapp. 

C. M. Clapp. 

Variation, May 4, H. C. Bumpus, Ph.D. 

The College has subscribed for the year 1899 the sum of fifty 
dollars toward the maintenance of the Woman's Table at the Naples 
Zo6logical Station. 



CURRENT EVENTS CLUB 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Anoah May Soule, M.L., Chairman 

Ursula Magrath, '99, Mabel Canada, 1900. 

Maud Webster, 1900. 



86 



STATE CLUBS 

PINE TREE STATE CLUB 
President, Winifred Ross Teel. 

VERMONT CLUB 
President, Julia French Owen. 

BUCKEYE CLUB 
President, Frances A. Hallock. 

EMPIRE STATE CLUB 
President, Fanny Dean. 

WACHUSETT CLUB 
President, Winifred L. Fairbanks. 

MOSQUITO CLUB 
President, Sarah Cornelia Edwards. 

GRANITE STATE CLUB 
President, Lota Norton Clancy. 

WE WESTERNERS 
President, Marie Isabel Matson. 

BAKED BEAN CLUB 
President, May Rogers Lane. 

SPRINGFIELD CLUB 
President, Anna Edith St. John. 

PENNSYLVANIA CLUB 
President, Eleanor Jennings Long. 



87 



^gpieo*^^^ 




Prmdmt, 
yiu-Puiidmt, 
l^teordint Sierilarji, 
Corrtspending Stcutarjr, 
Trtasurir, 



LILLA F. MORSE, -99. 

MARIE WELLES. 1900. 

BERTHA LYMAN. 1901. 

BESSIE ARMINGTON, 1900. 

MINNIE GRAHAM, 1900. 



COMMITTEES 

PRAYER MEETING 
Chairman, Julia F. Owen. '99. 
Miss C. F. Stevens, Ph.M.. Susie Dow, '99. 

Clara Sturtevant, '99, Belle Mead, 1900, 

Margaret Ball, 1900, Florence Locke, 1901, 

Jessie MacWilliams, 1902. 

MISSIONARY 
Chairman, Florence Sargent. 1900. 



Anna Mower, '99, 
Martha Sawyer, '99, 
Clintie Curtis, 1900, 



Cornelia Fairbanks, 



Frances Hallock, '99, 
Eleanor Kimball, 1900. 
Emily Covell, 1901, 
1901. 



FINANCE 

Otairman, Harriet Hazen» 1901. 
Jennie Kelso, '99, Bessie Sargent, '99, 

Cornelia Juliand, 1900, Faith Sanborn, 1900, 

Minnie Graham, 1900, Louise Mead, 1900, 

Edith Lewis, 1901, Laura Deacon, 1901, 

Jane Caskey, 1902. 

RECEPTION 

Chairman^ Eugenie Brocksmit, '99. 
Grace McKinley, '99, Mary Leavitt, '99, 

Emily Miller, 1900, Angeline Adams, 1900, 

Nannie Evans, 1900, Jessie Goodnow, 1901, 

Margaret Steen, 1901, Sarah Hollands, 1902. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Chairtfian, Anna Rodgers, 1900. 

Mary Schuyler, '99, Antoinette Wayave, '99, 

Ethel Ober, 1900, Masy Lane, 1900, 

Maude Webster, 1900, Edith Haskell, 1900, 

Celia Spenser, 1901, Lena Annis, 1901, 

Carrie Boa, 1901, Mabel Gilbert, 1901, 

Susan Lane, 1902. 

MUSIC 

Chairman^ Clara Mallory, '99. 
Alice Bid well, '99, Mabel Masters, 1900, 

Lillian Morse, 1901, Florence Wilder, 1901. 

BIBLE STUDY 

Chairman^ Bertha Whittemore, '99. 
Grace Learned, '99, Hide Yegashira, '99, 

Eleanor Long, 1900, Alice Browne, 1900, 

Helen Lyman , 1 90 1 , Gertrude Goodenough, 1 90 1 , 

Edith Peck, 1902. 

89 



TEMPERANCE 

Chairman^ Louise Roraback, '99. 
Carrie Plumb, '99, Minnie Crane, 1900, 

Bertha Meserve, 1900, Julia Reynolds, 1901, 

Maude Aldrich, 1902. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 

Chairman^ Bessie Armington, 1900. 
Florence Clark, '99, Alice Chase, '99, 

Alice Belcher, 1900, Grace Beach, 1900, 

Ethel Stocking, 1901, Susan Roundy, 1901, 

Florence Messer, 1902. 

HANDBOOK 

Chairman, Cornelia Juliand, 1900. 
Jennie Turner, '99, Eleanor Guild, 1900, 

Eleanor Oliver, 1901 Mary Hoffmeier, 1901, 

Grace Whittemore, 1902. 

ROOM AND LIBRARY 

Chairman, Jean Cole, 1900. 
Fannie Dean, '99, Belle Mead, 1900, 

Nellie Crawford , 1 90 1 . 

NOMINATING 

Chairman, Clara Sturtevant, '99. 
Louise Mead, 1900, Florence Locke, 1901. 

HOLYOKE 

Chairman, Louise Roraback, '99. 
Ida Dougherty, 1900, Edith Turner, 1900, 

Emily Miller, 1900, Florence Babbitt, 1901, 

Lena Annis, 1901, Isabel Thurston, 1902, 

Edna Hoffnagle, 1902. 

90 



TOWN 

Chairman, Amy Nettleton, '99. 
Katherine Shearer, '99, Mary Woodman. '99, 

Lilian McConnell, 1900, Helen Wood, 1901, 

Mabel Warren, 1901, Charlotte Swinington, 1902 

STUDENTS* FUND 

C/uiirmanj Miss Florence Purington. 
Janet Sinclair, '99, Helen Kendall, 1900. 

MISSIONARY LITERATURE 

Chairman, Mabel Canada, 1900. 
Miss C. M. Clapp, Ph.D., Eugenie Broeksmit, '99. 




91 






THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND 



Ltadtr, 

yici'Leadir, 

Sfcntary and Tnasunr, 



ALICE SEYMOUR BROWNE, 1900. 
HIDE YEGASHIRA, '99. 
GRACE LEARNED, '99. 



CLASS OF NINETY-NINE 



Ruth W, Haight, 



Grace Learned, 



Hide Yegashira. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED 

Alice Seymour Browne. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND ONE 

Lucia Washburn Hazen. 

CLASS OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWO 



Alice Harlow Bell, 
Emily Rosalie Bishop, 



Edith Gates, 
Suzan Davis Lane. 




92 




A..,.. S..„,„ 




Mai sun. Kvnnuy. Sluplelon. 


Hill. Kimball. 


Stuen, Bid well. 


Ada 


ma. Fitch. Brueksmi 






Wou.1, 




Uywn. 

GLEE CLUB 


""'" 


■ 




'Bus 


n^is Managir, Angellne P, 


Adam 




Uadtr, Mibel M. Fitch, '9.) 




FIRST SOPRANOS 


Accoi 


paiiiil, M. Isabeiie Matwii, V). 










Eleanor R. Kimball, 1900, 


Mabel M. FiUh, '99, 








Florence, C Hill, 190., 


H. Uuise Hale, 1900, 




SECOND SOF'RANGS 




Ruth L. Thomas, 1901. 


Alice T. Bidwell, '<». 








Ivah L. Kenney, 1900, 


M. Isabelle Matson, \f,. 




Margaret Stten, iqoi. 
FIRST ALTOS 




LaviiiiaS. Ro%, 1901, 


Jean D. Cole, 1900, 








HarrielleZ. Dyson, k/ji. 






SECOND ALTOS 




HelertC. Wood, 1901. 


Amelia M. SUplcton. '99, 




Lena E. Annis, 1901. 




Adelaide E. Sweetser, 1900. 




BANJO CLUB 



iS {Maimxtr, Angeline I'. Adams, 1900. 



Asnca L Collins, icjoo, 
Mnrie W. Welles, i'/x>, 



SHCONl) BANJOS 

HIRST MANDOLIN 

Btilha B, Wailf, 19011. 

SECOND MANDOLIN 

Jennie Kelso, V;. 

GUITARS 



Anna H Moore, «)•'•, 
Hotence E, Wiljer, 1901. 



Hlhdyn L. Hull, i<;oi. 



Veicni Huntress, 1900, 
Mabel E. Masters, 1900. 




^^22.r 



/ay 



MAY 19, 1897 

BASKET BALL 
<q8vs. 'qg. Score, 1-4. 
'99 vs. 1900.* Score, o-o. 

SLOW BICYCLE RACE 
H. Smith, '98. Time, a m. i; lec. 
M. Rkhirdi, '98. 
F. Sargent, 1900. 

\oa YARDS DASH 
J. Hurington, 1900. Time, 13.7 lec. 
E. Slowell, '98. 
J. Stickney, '97. 

THROWING BASE BALL 
M. Lane, 1900. 1 ij ft. 7 in. 
M. Buridgh, 98. 
J. Harrington, 1900. 

BOAT RACE, SINGLES 
M. Lane, igoo. Time, j m. 38,3 tec. 
N. Burleigh, '98. 
M. Pierce, 97. 

TENNIS, DOUBLES 



G. Voochees, '97, \ 
C. Edwarda, '99, \ 

6-1,6-1. 
E. Bale*, '97. ) 
N. Burleigh, '98, 1 



J F. Voortiees, Sp., 
) M. Mohn, '99. 

!M. Lane, 1900, 
S. Killhouae, '99. 




JUNE 8. 1898 
BASKET BALL 
'99 vs. 1900. Score, o-a. 
1900 vs. 1901. Score, 0-1. 

SLOW BICYCLE RACE 
C. Clark, 1901. Time, a m. 19 sec. 
G. Bacon, 1901. 

All others failed to finish. 

100 YARDS DASH 
C. Partridge, '99. Time, 14 4-5 sec. 
L. Robinson, '99. 

B. Wiite, 1900. 

1$ YARDS DASH 

E. Kimball, 1900. Time, y sec. 
L. Robinson, '99. 

C. Partridge, '99. 

BOAT RACE, SINGLES 
M. Lane. 1900. Time, ■) m. 44 j-$ sec. 

F. Leavitt, 1901. 
E. Slocking, 1901. 

BOAT RACE, DOUBLES 
M. Une, 1 

B.M«d, t '9~' Time, > mm. M s<c. 
H. Matthews, ) 
A. Ogden, f '"*"■ 
E. Stocking, ) 
R. Thomas, f '**'■ 



JUNE 8, 1898 

TENNIS SINGLES 

\ 

-t 



E. Healey, 1901, vs. M. Lane, 1900. 
6-a, 2-6, 6-4. 

TENNIS DOUBLES 

nNALS 

S. Hapgood, ) ( C. Edwards, 

A Swectser, f »9oo vs. '99. \ m. Mohn. 

6-4, 6-2. 
C. Edwards, ) . ( B. Waite, 

M. Mohn. \ '99 vs. 1900, j e ober. 

6-a, 6-a . 

Umpins, OAay /p, 1^97— E. C. Bates '97, E. Leavitt, '97, E Coolidge '97, M. Richards, '98. 
Judgts — L. Woodbridge, '97, H. Campbell, '98, J. E. Pinney, '99. 

Timik$$p$rs — M. Pierce, '97, E. Dickinson, '98. 

Startif—A, H. Turner, B.A. 

Umpifis, Jun$ 8, 1898— H, Calder, ^98, N. Burleigh, '98, M. Blackstock, '98, J. Turner, '99, J. 
Hanrington, 1900, E. Reed, 1901. 

Judges— D. Hapgood, '98, Mary C. Lowell, M D., M. Percival, '98. 

fimikupir—E. S. Dickinson, B.A. 

Starter — A. H. Turner, B.A. 

Number of Toints — '99, 15; 1900, 27; iqoi, 27. 



♦June 8, V- '99 vs. iqou. Score, 0-0. 

tTie by A. Sweetser, 1900, and R. Kenyon, 1901. 



98 




Caplaiii, Jtisic Harriiigttin, 
U/t FMvard, Bfrtha Wailf, 
Lrfl Crutre, Anna Rodgrrs, 
Lrjt Guard, Eleanor Kimball, 



Coal Thro 

CtHlrt, Elizabelh Nims, 

Goal 'DtfiiidtT, Helen Kendall, 

SuhitiluU, Mabel Canada. 



■JJi.i;/!* Forward, Angeline Adanis, 
Right Ctutrt, Belle Meail, 
Right Giijid, Rniily Miller, 



f f f s e'i 9 



Griffin, Dyso 



1901 BASKET BALL TEAM 



Captain, Hatritlte Dyson. 
U/l FoTvard. Ruth Thomas, 
Lt/t Ctitlrt. Ethel Osgood, 
Le/t Guard, Beilha Ghtlin. 



Goal ThrD-wfr,\im» Wieard, 

Centre, Eva Gay, 

Goal Di-ftiider. Mabel Warren, 



Right Foraard, Anna Ogden, 
Ri/^ht Cetitri, Harrielle Oysor 

Hight Guard, Susie Watson, 




GQLTCLUB-" 



OFFICERS 

Trtsidimt, ...... EMMA SOUTHWORTH. 

SiCfiimty^ MMd TrMsufif, .... HARRIET McPHERSON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
ANGELINE P. ADAMS, IDA M. DOUGHERTY, 

EDITH H. HASKELL. 



.S^^i^ 




OFFICERS 

CspiMM, ...... FLORENCE E. CLARK, '99. 

LiiuUnant'Captain, .... FLORENCE M. PHILLIPS, 1901. 

GOAL TENDERS 
KATE E. PATERSON, 1900, FLORENCE PHILLIPS, 1901. 

RUSHERS 
FLORENCE E. CLARK, '99, MAY R. LANE, 1900, 

LILLA F. MORSE, '99, MARY L. ROBINSON, 1900. 

HELEN HOPKINS, 1902. 

CENTRES 
BELLE MEAD, 1900, CHARLOTTE S. SWININGTON, 1902. 

HALF-BACKS 
CHARLOTTE E. LEAVITT, 1902, SARAH HILLHOUSE, »99. 






NONOTUCK BOATING CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Captain, 

LUuitnant'Captain , 

Coach, 

Secniary and Tuasuur, 



MAY ROGERS LANE, 1900. 

BELLE LOUISE MEAD, 1900. 

ABBIE H. TURNER, A.B. 

CLINTIE D. CURTIS, 1900. 



MOUNT HOLYOKE TENNIS CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Pusident, 
yice-President, 
Secretary and Treasurer, 



SARAH C. EDWARDS, '99. 

LOTA NORTON CLANCY, '99. 

MARTHA MOHN, '99. 




102 




*" -Si^^a-.-,- 



"The Notches. 
APedeKrian Club. 

Motto : Agegutume h ooraghnttimc j-fv 
Callel sorvatiimc! 



GERTRUDE DEMORtST MIX, 'g8. 
. MAY ROGERS LANE. r<,oo. 



E. U. CLUB 



Motto 


Night is fo 


r playtime: 




Good heave 


s! not daytiun 


Lard High Slaytf Up, 

Lord High Co<isi.m,r, . 

'HighfU^oyjl SmiUr, 

SupiTb Plane! of the E. U. Hiav 








The Grtat Unknown, 








mastiT Maktr of Fitdgt, 

•Pigi to Ike Lord High Stay.-r Up. 

SjUIIH^ of Iht Superb Plaatl. 

f'lachir-al-Mnns. 






7ht Supreme Goddess, . 








Champion Slair Squeaker. 
Cenleel Appreeialor of Faded Jo 


kes. 







JOSEPHINE E PINNEY. 
1SABELLERICH DREW. 
EVA BERTHOUDCAY. 
FI.OREKCR M . PHILLIPS. 
ALICE ROLLINS LITTLE- 
SUE L. HAl'GOOD 
MAY McKINNEY. 
FRANCES MORGAN. 
ABBIE E. ALDRICH. 
, MARGARET S. STEEN. 
HELEN LOIS MATTHEWS, 
ELIZABETH M, GULICK. 



t . 



% 



'» • 



TS^ 



FOUNDER'S DAY 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9, 1898 

PROGRAM 

Organ Prelude. 

Anniversary Anthem, /ohn Stainer. 

Scriptnre Reading, Rev. Judson Smith, D.D. 

Prayer. 

TriOy from Elijah, .... Mendelssohn. 

Address, Rev. Stephen G. Barnes, D.D. 

Choms, "List! the Cherubic Host," 

Bass Solo, '< I Heard the Voice of Harpers, 

From A. R. GauVs '' Holy City r 
Prayer and Benediction. 



A 




105 




'epmr 




COMMENCEMENT CALENDAR 

SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 1898 

Baccalaureate Sermon, . . Rev. D. O. Mears, D.D. 

MONDAY AFTERNOON 

Step Ceremonies. 

MONDAY EVENING 

Organ Recital for the Juniors. 

TUESDAY MORNING 

Alumnae Meeting. 

TUESDAY AFTERNOON 

Class Day Exercises. 

TUESDAY EVENING 

Concert by Mount Holyoke Glee and Banjo Clubs. 

WEDNESDAY MORNING 

Commencement Address, . Rev. Charles M. Mead, D.D. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 

Senior Reception. 
BACCALAUREATE SERVICE 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE, SUNDAY, JUNE 19, 1898 

Organ Prelude, .... Guilmant. 

Invocation. 

Anthem, ..... Best. 

Scripture Reading. 

Solo, O, '* Ye That Hear," .... Buck. 

Prayer. 

Anthem, ..... Fred Hiller. 

Sermon, .... Rev. D. O. Mears, D.D. 

Hymn 600. 

Prayer and Benediction. 

106 




CLASS DAY 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE, TUESDAY, JUNE 21, (8 



(IN THE grove) 
College Song. 



" The Shades at College," 
The Listening Power, 
The Secret of In 
Planting of Ivy. 
Ivy Song, 



Harriet Cami'bell 

Mar(;aret Sproul Geddes 

Mabel Leta Eaton 

Nettie Carolfne Bukleich 



COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 



MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE, 

,-. n 1 J * Prelude in G, 

Organ Prelude, 1 „., . , „, 
^ ( Pilgrim .s Chorus, 



Anthem. 

Scripture Reading and Prayer, 

Anthem, 

Address, 

Presentation of Diploma.';, 

Hymn. 

Report on Present Conditiop of the Endowment Fund 

Prayer and Benediction. 

I or 



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 1898 
Dubois 
Wagner 
Mendelssohn 
Rev. J. L. R. Trask, D.D. 
/. Stainc 
Rev. Charles M. Mead, D.D. 
Pres. Elizaueth Storrs Mead 










-■■i 



'^^ 




NINETEEN HUNDRED 

ANGELINE PECK ADAMS.— *' Work and worry"' 
is Angle's molto in life, and to the former she 
devotes a few minutes every day. But in spite of 
her worried looks, she still finds time — as in Freshman 
year — for a few of those friendships which are the very 
soul of her existence. What she would do without 
these and math is a problem for science to solve. 

Louise Allvh. — As Louise is the only Allyn in the 
class, why should she distinguish herself with a "y"? 
What the Fates have in store for her has not yet been 
revealed, but we feel confident that they have some quiet 
work reserved. Louise studies and recites without flunk- 
ing; there is no waste of nervous tissue, and the mental 
states are rarely over-excited. 

Bessie Brigham Arminuton. — The questioning 
look on Bessie's face as she ■' wonders why " is sometimes 
misleading, for the expression and question have become 
habitual to her features and tongue, and the apparent 
thirst for knowledge is only the result of reflex action. 



Ruth Stewart Arnold.— This demure maiden is 
well known in College for two reasons; first and greatest, 
her dimples, and second, her fondness for coffee on certain 
occasions, although she never takes it at table. Her other 
characteristics are too well known to be published here. 

Ill 



E 




B 



Margaret Elizabeth Ball since Freshman year 
has partially outgrown the comfortable habit of taking 
naps in class. This is probably due to the increased 
activity of her brain. She enjoys judging a man by his 
best moments, discussing weighty subjects and reading 
Browning. 



|H|^^g Ethel Hannah Bakdwell. — Congratulations to 

^ Gi'eenfield on the possession of such a mathematical grind. 

^H^^ Long may she live to keep the class accounts and to 

^^^^r^ excel in all competitions for the greatest amount of 

^ '.£^MM studying done in the twenty-four hours of each day. 

AuBiE Cogswell Bakker is a good example of the 
saying that "appearances are deceitful." for it is a well- 
known fact that she is worth any two ordinary mortals 
t^^p«-^ where there's fun on hand. She has trotted so fleetly 
jf f'""' through College that it is a wonder that she is still in the 

class of 1900. 

Eva Ruth Barton. — Twenty-two summers have 
passed lightly over Eva's head, and we firmly believe that 
another twenty-two may go by and leave little trace on 
her demure brow. We know little about Eva's home 
life. "My uncle" is the only representative who has 
been seen or heard of in these parts. 

Grace Eldridge Beach is a person who is never 
"seen and not heard." Her presence is always made 
manifest by an easily flowing current of thought, which 
aims both to amuse and to instruct. Her intellect is 
charmingly great, her versatility and originality greater. 

112 




Alice Emeline Bei.ciiek might be termed the 
class Deaconess. We have the greatest admiration for 
so small a body with so great a soul.* 



Essie Winning Boyd wears a light hat and a dark 
coat, sits next to Sue in Chapel, and is in Belle's class in 
Logic, but is seldom called npon. The "board" have 
been too preoccupied to study further characteristics. 



Mary Alice Bradford is "par excellence" the 
class dig. To know is evidently her one aim, and in 
order to reach the goal of her ambition, she grinds, 
grinds, grinds. 



Susan Mary Bradley is small, but how she can 
write! Poetry ~ yards and yards of it; songs, chants, 
serenades and— hymns. It is a great talent to be tal- 
ented, and not to be overconscious of it withal. That 
is Susan, quaint, quiet, demure little Sue Bradley of New 
England. 

Alice Seymour Browne is chiefly noted for the 
number of committees to which she belongs, and of which 
she is the leading member. Her most characteristic 
phrase is, "I cannot do that, for I have too much to 
do already." 



■ 



m 



i 




Hi 



E 



Mabel Augusta Canada.* 



Florence Edna Chamberlain is an extremely rare 
individual, who never "flunks", never forgets, and never 
makes mistakes. Her past has been glorious, her present 
is even more so, and her future cannot be described, 
because of the greatness of its possibilities. 

Jean Dean Cole has never had the wish to see her- 
self as others see her. But there's nothing like being 
self-sufficient. 

Jean is an addition to our class, one of the shining 
lights in fact, as everyone knows (not excepting Miss 
Cole). 

Jean's tendency to assume that there are " two souls 
with but a single thought," where her "elders and 
betters" are concerned, is well known. 

A(;nes Louise Collins plays the banjo. She carries 
the banjo in a leather case. Miss Collins is leader of the 
Banjo Club. She is said to prefer the banjo to the 
guitar or mandolin. Perhaps it is for this reason that 
Miss Collins is not leader of the Mandolin Club, but of 
the Banjo Club. It is very pleasant to play a banjo, is it 
not? 

Minnie Wurth Crane is one of those girls who 
never did any thing bad, or funny, or very wonderful. 
She is, however, possessed of a good head for business, a 
good mind for study, and a good heart divided in its 
affections between her class and her roommate. Lately 
.she almost ruined her reputation by " stealing tarts ", but 
was acquitted becau.se of the dismissal of the court with- 
out adjournment. 

•KumJurs uri; refeircd t" Wis^ Canada for any information desired— ED. 



Ci.iNTrE Delafield Curtis comes to us from the 
lofty heights of Jersey City. Besides being fond of a 
frank and hasty argument (as anyone of her class will 
tell you), Clintie suffers from over-anxiety for her Alma 
Mater, which she proved one night by rousing the whole 
college to extinguish a gaslight. 



e 



Marinda PoLi.Y Davis is one of the "quiet kind ", 
so rarely expressing her opinon that we have but little to 
say of her. 

Pauline Fay Devereux. — Fay's laugh is her own 
peculiar property, either inherited or invented some 
twenty years ago. Her disposition is cheerful, and her 
only prominent fault a somewhat exasperating slowness 
of speech. Although apparently not of a poetical tem- 
. perament, she considers the reading of poetry her partic- 
ular talent. She has rendered herself noteworthy by 
her frequent remarks on "men and things" in general, 
and her frequent quotations from " Hattie ". 

Ida Marion Dougherty. — To quote the immortal 
poets. Miss Dougherty has talent which, if cultivated, 
may be used sometime for illustrating "The Fireside 
Companion," or even the "New York World." Ida likes 
to be considered original. Her advice on all occasions 
is "Don't be facetious." 





Helen Douglas is an abbreviated individual, pos- 
sessing original ideas. She has gained for herself a 
reputation in dramatic circles as "The Fiddler" of Dickens' 
"Christmas Carol." We wonder if she has found out yet 
where the Y. W. C. A. room is. The only trouble with 
Helen js that things " come by freight." 
115 



a 

E 




Isabel Rich Drew, having heard several graphic 
lectures on Hawaii, resolved to see that island for herself. 
She planned, on her return, a supplementary lecture 
course, to be illustrated hy songs and dancing, but has 
been obliged to give it up, on account of mental depres- 
sion, resulting from a Sophomore squelch and an unsuc- 
cessful fudge party. 

Elizabeth Meredith Dunning, another of the quiet 
ones, is always ready to uphold her beliefs. In class 
work she has figured but little for several reasons, among 
which is her fondness for investigation in the chemical 
line, where the instructors have seemed quite to her taste. 



Marv Lombard Esleeck. — Good nature radiatesfrom 
her in an ever-ready smile. Even in her Junior year she 
has not been able to put away the toys of childhood, but 
still cherishes a choice collection of dolls, woolly dogs, 
etc, which bids fair to remain with her to the end of 
college days. 



Nannie Jefferson Evans. — Nan's bright personality 
and sunny smile make her a class favorite. She is very 
fond of Boston's historic places, and possesses many Har- 
vard souvenirs. 



Winifred Luella Fairbanks needs mention here 
for but one thing, as far as we can find out, and that is 
her popularity at Amherst. 



Alice Carey Field. — "Bug" is the "little chemist" 
of 1900. She was always devoted to the study, and it is 
her greatest regret that she cannot continue it. In her 
Freshman year she developed a remarkable affinity for 
another member of the class, and they formed a chemical 
compound which has never yet been broken up. Her 
other characteristics are a love of silence and solitude. 

Frances Richmond Foster is one of our most loyal 
Nineteen Hundreders. She views the class through 
golden spectacles, sings its praises to the tune of "Sweet 
Marie," and being afflicted with an acute form of insom- 
nia, spends sleepless nights in thinking of its virtues. 



Marion Foster, as a "raraavis" among ur — a min- 
ister's daughter — is an exceptionally important and valua- 
ble member of the class. 



■ 

JH 



Gertrude Elizabeth Gaylord is our " town repre- 
sentative", and she's loyal, if she isn't very much in 
evidence except at class meetings. 



LiLLA Eliza Gilnack is one of the few girls be- 
tween eighteen and twenty-two who succeed in doing a 
great deal and saying very little. 




MvRABEL Josephine Gould. 




She can read, she can write, 
In Math, she's out of sight, 

Creek as well. 
She can pass a Physics test. 
But it must be confessed 

She can't spell. 



Minnie Almira Graham has been a "stationery" 
figure on the College horizon for the past three years. 
When she ends her "Blissful "existence at Mount Holyoke, 
she expects to enter the ranks of the " school marms ". 



Eleanor Wilmot Guild resembles the "good old 

Duke of York." "When she's up, she's up, and when 

she's down, she's down," Never caring for figures, she 

elected conic sections for the good of her soul, and the 

»>• .'^ moral of that is ? 

Harriet Louise Hale has two peculiarities. One 
is a great fondness for anything edible, the other is her 
equally great liking for cats. One might almost accuse 
her of premature old-maidhood, were not another possible 
deduction suggested by the fact that she cares only for 
"black cats". 

Grace Twemlow Hammond, although no one who 
knows her would imagine it, is a strong advocate of 
"woman's rights", also of "woman's writes". There is 
one direction in which she is, or used to be, a little weak. 
We refer to the difference between a bug and the frait 
of a fern. There is a difference, you know. 

118 



Susie Loraine Hapgood is so fascinating that we 
must follow the example of college men and call her a 
"queen, " She is, however, so innocent that we must 
also with our brothers call her "ingenu^". In spit© of 
this last fact, her popularity with those of the stronger sex 
warrants us in calling her decidedly "smooth". 

Edith Stone Haskell graduated from the "Train- 
ing School " of Hyde Park, Mass. , and came indirectly to 
this College, where she has distinguished herself chiefly 
by her yell and her executive ability. The Bible class of 
her Freshman year showed in many a profound discussion 
the dawn of thoughtful ness, while her course in elocution 
developed her oratorical power, 

Helen Augusta Hazen of the mosquito district of 
the United States has been visiting an intimate friend in 
Holyoke for the last three years, and incidentally attend- 
ing Mount Holyoke College as a Classical student. She 
has a clear, light complexion, is of medium stature, is 
very modest, and was never known to be rude. 

Grace Aueline Howe, for the past three years, has 
been leading a quiet, uneventful life, and we are unable 
to find a single personal grind to place on the debit side 
of the Llamarada Board's accounts. We therefore believe 
she has a great future before her. 

Verena Huntress is a modest and harmless young 
lady, a rare example of the type of students known as 
"pluggers". Once during the college year she feels the 
necessity of exercise in the form of riding to Amherst on 
her wheel, but the rest of the time the latter is vigorously 
rusting in the basement of Pearsons Hall. 








Helen Jackson sleeps, eats, drinks, "flunks" on 
occasion, talks as does almost any other college girl, and 
studies, mostly in chapel. 



Susie Mary Jordan. — September, 1896, beheld Susie 
May alight from the car in South Hadley with a patroniz- 
ing expression and an air of dignity and precision. From 
that day to this her reputation has remained unchanged, 
and she is known as a model student of the old school. 
She has never told a wrong story, never talked to 
Amherst students, and never taken any violent exercise 
other than dumb-bells and wands. 

Cornelia Emma Julianu is an unfortunate mortal, 
whose "natural tendency " is a source of anxiety to her 
friends. Her acquired tendency may be spoken of as 
that which has made her favorite pursuit the acquisition 
of Holyoke ladies of position for Miss Bemis' department. 
Minor tendencies, whether natural or acquired, are known 
to be proctoring, rooming alone yet not alone, receiving 
voluminous letters, and collecting Hamilton monograms. 

Helen Idella Kendall is an ardent believer in 
co-education, and is frequently seen in Amherst, where 
she is notsd for her brother. Her ability in the dramatic 
line was discovered when playing the r61e of "Country 
Youth" in "Alice in Wonderland." Basket ball and 
washing dishes are her favorite pursuits. Helen is a 
remarkable instance of how college life can cure obsti- 
nacy of disposition. She intends to be "at home" after 
June 24, 1900. 

Marv Katharine Ken])Rick. 

Miss Kentlrick, Ihe «gre«able. 
Whose even-lempered smile 
WouJd cause a pUyful humor 
In » mourning crocodile. 
She hails from St. Louis, as everybody has heard. 
Mary is as slow as time, and constitutionally tired. Her 
favorite sport is talking about Mary; favorite author, 
Archibald C. Gunter ; favorite study, Mathematics ; 
denomination. Baptist. 



IVAH Louise Kennev, like Oliver Twist, is always 
asking for more. Only in this case it is pins that are 
desired, not porridge. We learn that she also uses an 
amazing number of stamps, and that a letter from Dart- 
mouth finds its way to box both punctually and fre- 
quently. 

Kimball. 

Rosannah b h« middle name, 

Eleanor, her first; 
" Bok " the most facetioiu one, as 

"Kimmey " is her woist. 

Several things might be said on the subjects, 
"Eleanor and Her Easy Way with the Faculty," "Her 
Winning Manner," etc., etc., etc., but space will not 
permit, 

Jennie Louise Knight. 

Miss Knight, so Ihey say. 
Has a small, quiet way 
or making you think 
She's not present. 
Don't believe it! 



May Rogers Lane. 
Athletics - 



Eleanor Jennings Long. — From the Syriac: — 
" 'Verily,' saith the prophet, 'she is one of the comeliest 
hand-maidens in the tents of the tribe, and of a rare spirit. 
* * * But lo! the wonder grew! For the more 
excited did the hand-maid become, the more slowly did the 
words fashion themselves in her month. So that the 
prophet might say, ' By the two-horned, is the hand- 
maid slow.' But that is another parable." 






Mabel Edna Masters. 




Two weeks before the dite — 
Prompt as f«te — 
Can't wait! 

Mabel Masters. 



Lilian Brown McConneLl. — When "Brownie'' 
first opened her eyes on this world, she smiled. As 
life seemed pleasant to her, she continued to smile through 
childhood, and even unto the present day. Aad when 
Nineteen Hundred returns for the fortieth reunion, we 
hope to find her smiling still. 



Harriet Ph(F,be McPherson has the biggest heart 
in College, and weighs 150 pounds. Her one theme is 
Rockville, and of this she'll sing "till moons do wax and 
wane no more." 



Emma Jane McLean is another of those enviable 
Rockville girls. Her criterion is " my father." She is 
distinguished by her gay gowns and gayer hats. 



Belle Louise Mead. — ig^oA. D. OldGraduate: — 
What's this, what's this, what's this? Mead? Certainly 
I remember her — girl everybody would remem1>er — 
everybody liked her — droll girl — make you laugh at your 
own Chemistry exams. Used to come tearing in to every- 
thing at the last minute, but you got used to that. Class 
made her Royai Picker-up of Paper Wads. 

12:3 ■ ■ ■ ■ ' .'.■.: 



Louise Celestia Mead spends most of her time in 
digging pathways in her brain, wherein may wander all 
beaotiful ideas and knowledge, under the strict supervis- 
ion, be it said, of her rigorous conscience. She strives to 
cultivate a lowly spirit by " running herself down " on 
all possible occasions, but her classmates continue their 
belief in her ability despite her self-depreciatory remarks. 

Grace Hollister Merwin is an admirer of the 
medical profession. Her most valued possessions are a 
certain photograph which she cherishes with extreme 
care, and her great aunt's wedding gown in which she 
appears from time to time, thereby exciting the envy and 
admiration of all beholders. 

Bertha Niles Meserve is the happy possessor of 
an even disposition. Apparently, whatever the external 
stimuli, her central affections are always pleasant, and her 
sensations are never violent. Whether the fact that she 
doesn't know the meaning of the word "matinee " accounts 
for this enviable state of mind, we are unable to say. 

Emily Mulkord Miller as class president during 
Sophomore year displayed the patience of Job, and the 
finesse of a statesman. Her " Masterpiece of Diplomacy " 
was her negotiation of the delicate china question. At 
the expiration of her term she retired into private life and 
may now be seen walking with a buoyant step across the 
campus as though glad to be relieved of the cares of state. 



Katharine Moore studies chemistry, recites chem- 
istry, works in the chemistry laboratory, teaches the chem- 
istry infants, thinks chemistry, dreams chemistry — is 
chemistry. 







f-fs* 




Sara Elizabeth Moore is one of tbe most loyal 
members of the class. She is also easily distinguished 
as being small, wearing black eyes and hair and a notice. 
ably brilliant smile. Miss Moore has a weird and winning 
style of elocution and is conspicuous for her generosity. 



Julia Frances Murdock, being more devoted to 
fudge and gossip than to study, decided that the easiest 
way in which to acquire wisdom was not from books, but 
from one who already had the precious possession. After 
a year's search she found some one Wise enough to suit her. 

Helen Florence Newton is a star almost unequalled 
in brilliancy. She left College for some months in order 
not to have to graduate with '99, thus proving her loyalty 
to 1900. She is distinguished by her brown eyes and 
her non-communicativeness. She just escapes being 
either a ' ' dig " or a genius. 

Elizabeth Theresa NrMS is guardian of a be- 
witching dimple, but in other respects is much like the 
rest of us. Although her knowledge of the drug store 
is limited to the soda fountain, she can furnish con- 
coctions for every "ill that flesh is heir to," and we 
predict for her a career in pharmacy.* 

Ethel Clakke Ober closely follows the habits of 
her renowned French ancestors, in her attempt to empha- 
size her speech by numberless graceful motions of the 
hands. She thoroughly believes that fudge is condu- 
cive to mind activity, and by living up to her ideas she 
now ranks among the foremost in the art of fudge making. 



Kate Elizabeth Paterson, born in the land to 
which absconding bank clerks flee, came to us bearing aloft 
the English flag and crying "God save the Queen." 
Were she not still as stubborn as John Bull, she might 
easily pass as a loyal niece of Uncle Sam. 

Her smile is as bright as the rising sun, and co-ex- 
tensive with consciousness, and like Tennyson's Brook her 
giggle goes on forever. 

Mabelle Jeanne Perry or " Mabe," calls to mind 
that new version of the old tale that runs as follows: — 

"There was a litlle giil, 
And she had no litlle cur\ 

To hang right down on her forehead ; 
And when she was bad, she was very, very bad, 
And when she was good she was horrid," 

Maud Parepa Pingree, alias ' ' Alice " is a sweet girl 
who thinks every thing "just dandy," She has a literary 
tendency and is controlled by an irresistible impulse to 
write something. It is to be understood by the reading 
public that the failures of the present Llamarada Board 
are due to the inconsiderateness of the Mount Holyoke in 
retaining for their own profit an editor of such value to 
the Llamarada. 

EsTELLE Potter was born up in the clouds and the 
first question she was known to ask was " why ?" When 
she descended from the heights her one ambition was to 
become a lawyer, and we are looking any day for the 
announcement of the firm " Potter, Potter & Potter." 

Maria Beardslee Prescott is one of those happy 
gushing mortals who soar above the petty cares and trials 
of every day life, and let nothing less important than 
" conflicting engagements," a mislaid billet-doux or a for- 
gotten fudge party worry them. Still she's plucky. 
She's bound to go through college and intends to fight it 
out on this line if it takes — another century. 



"91 




m 






Amy Sarah Roberts is slower thao cold molasses, 
but this is her misfortune rather than her fault. Yes, 
Amy is slow, but she goes like clock work — never varying. 



Mary Louisa Robinson originated in the land where 
they also cultivate sugar cane and pickaninnies. Louie's 
favorite song is " After the Ball," and the higher the ball 
goes, the higher does Louie go after it. 



Anna Hendricks Rodgers. — In Anna we have a 
prodigy, — she never flunked an exam., never put up a 
bluff, and has never been called up before the President, 
Her head is as level as a western prairie, and as an 
authority on Parliamentary Law, Robert's " Rules of 
Order " isn't in it. 



Faith Sanborn. — Nineteen Hundred is proud to 
know that it has at least one of the three graces, and 
trusts it possesses the others. This one is very unassum- 
ing and modest, wears a studious look and a timid smile. 



Florence Gertrude Sargent. — "Flossie" is a 
dear little thing with an air of superiority all out of pro- 
portion to the size of her physical organism. Her neat- 
ness is proverbial and yet she has never been known to 
wear more than six shirt waists per week. 



Bertha Maria Schlotzer has the golden record of 
never but once being absent from basketball practice, and 
then sending an excuse in writing. She pays her class 
dues without being dunned, and the page that records 
her chapel attendance is unspotted by a single absence. 



Laura Elizabeth Smith is one of our recent acquisi- 
tions. As an independent Sophomore puts it, " She was 
incomplete and came back to be concluded." She doesn't 
find the road to wisdom a hard one to travel. 

TiRZAH Snell Smith as a Freshman and Soph, 
was the typical Mount Holyoke girl, being a missionary's 
daughter, born on Indian soil ; but since the return of her 
parents last June Tirzah's glory has waned. A less 
noticeable characteristic is her capability for making a 
mess of things whenever she opens her mouth, being 
more gifted in thought than in speech. 

Amelia Mary Stapleton has a settled conviction 
that Fate is against her. Why, her friends are unable to 
find out, for she is a favored mortal whom a certain well- 
known periodical designates as " The Girl with a Voice,"' 
and she has an advantage over the rest of us in that she 
can go home every night. With such blessings what 
more could mortal ask ? 

Marion Storr,s left college for a year to come back 
as a member of Nineteen Hundred. Having become one 
with us she swells the worthy band of those who devote 
their lives to Mathematics and Physics. She can be 
recognized clear across the campus, for we know her by 
her gait. 

1«7 



i 





Adelaide EsTELi.E Sweetser. — As big as life and 
twice as natural. She began her career at Bates, but 
having early come to a realization of her mistake she 
came here and is now convinced that Mount Holyoke 
bates them all. 



Sarah Pearl Taber is much envied because the 
necessity of making the 1 1.30 car excuses her from Phil- 
osophy recitation some minutes earlier thon is strictly 
necessary. Pearl should not take advantages of her 
instructors. 



Winifred Ross Teel's name alone prevents her from 
being known as the eighth Sutherland sister. She is noted 
mainly for height of collar, brevity of skirt, vivacious 
manner, and love for the brethren. 



Edith Turner. 

A dignified maiden is Edilh, 
Faithful, quiet, upright, true, 
Daing just what stie ought (o do. 
Nothing M> much the whole world n«ede(h 
As more of such maidens as Edith. 



Em,ma Louise Tuxburv, or the " Princess Louise" 
as she prefers to be called, does so want to be dignified. 
Think of Louise with her airy step, Delsartean posture 
and coquettish eye posing as Dignity ! 

She is original but says she doesn't try to be. 



Edith Sutliffe Wade is a nice quiet little thing. 
She made experiments in her Sophomore year on economy 
of time, by using four histories in the Library at once. 
Her own history is not yet written. 



^^ 



Bertha Belle Waite, like most of us, began life 
with a yell and has still kept up her infantile tendency; ,^,..-. 

she poses before Nineteen Hundred in that capacity and ^^Bv 
has worn out her larynx in its interests. Extravagance 
is her besetting sin, and what she can't spend she breaks 
or loses. 



WiLHELMlNA LOUISE Waite contrary to all previous 
records in the College annual grew thin in her Freshman 
year, and has never been able to make up for this discrep- 
ancy — accounted for by thf fact that she dosed herself 
with Strong medicine. 

Edyth Welles Warner is a good subject for 
psychological research; her thoughts, her dreams, her 
visions no man can fathom, and her conversational powers 
are preeminent — like Harry Gill's teeth she "chatters, 
chatters, chatters still." Miss Warner gave an eloquent 
plea for birds, from which we quote the following striking 
and original statement: — " The way to preserve birds is 
to let them live and not kill them." 

Grace Ethel Webber is noted for the abnormal 
development of her conversational powers, Impressive- 
ness is the chief characteristic of all her remarks and she 
leaves one wondering if she talks in her sleep. Whether 
it is a family trait or not we are unable to say, but if so, as 
Grace has six sisters, the Webber household must be far 
from quiet. 



ikLjil 



1 

f 



Maud Ef-EANOr Webster. — Oberlin, wishing to 
preserve the kindly bond which was formed by Mary 
Lyon and which was still further cemented "after the 
fire," sent us a representative in the person of Miss 
Webster. 



L'fc:?=!£SiW'. 




Marie Woixott Welles is a girl possessed of many 
attractions and "much Grace." She is always willing to 
come when anyone has Calder, and her FacuUies are 
numerous and varied. She can do anything that is 
required of her — such as filling class and other officesi — as 
Welles anyone, and is altogether a Gay girl. 

EuzEBETH Williams objected slightly to belonging 
to us on the ground that she"d be a mugwump if she did, 
but now that we have her she's all there. Elizabeth 
possesses two enviable faculties, a faculty sister and a 
faculty for being funny. She doesn't have to think to be 
funny, in fact she has to think not be, but you'd never 
think it to look at her ! 



Eva Cecilia Woodwell. — "There ain't a great 
deal of natural get-up and howl about Eva, but she stays 
put," and what she lacks in quantity she makes up in 
quality. 

Clara Frances Mallory has two possessions which 
perhaps we envy her — and perhaps we don't. A Yale pin 
is one. " My small brother" is the other. One is always 
in evidence, the other — just about always. Her chief 
occupation is playing the organ, although she drops into 
a recitation incidentally.* 

ilTssMaliiiry is a Senior in full anJ reK"l»r standinR, but Ninety-Nine cruelly 



w 



TO DR. MUIR 

HEN this song we first sang 'neath your window, 

With the mercury twenty below, 
You were forced to refrain from attention, 

To get ready for tea, don't you know. 



When an encore most kindly we offered, 

Our suggestion was frigidly met. 
It was time to go home to our suppers, 

And such duties we shouldn't forget. 

But in spite of our icy reception, 
Your pleasure we're mindful of still. 

And we thought that sometime an odd moment, 
By reading this song you might fill. 

So we give it a place in our annual, 
And when o'er the pages you glance. 

As you pause where our Psyche song's printed, 
You'll find time to read it perchance. 



131 



PSYCHOLOGY SONG 



TUNE: ''The Dude Who Couldn't Dance. 



ft 



I 



N the precious ** leisure" moments that with Psyche we have spent, 

Professor Titchener taught us that we've each a natural bent, 
Of sensations forty thousand, too, much knowledge we did gain. 
And the charming law of Weber caused the common one of pain. 



Chorus : 

Oh, we'll ne'er forget our Psyche, all its pleasure and its pain. 
With its two affection theory and its introspective strain. 

For another conscious element most vainly we did look, 
Conation and attention failed to prove it — ** in the book." 
Coextensive quite with consciousness our affections — as defined — 
When we learned we had perceptions, though ideas we couldn't find. 

Our consciousness consisting of ideas which ever change. 
Association of ideas is not so very strange. 
It brings aesthetic sentiments, unpleasant feelings, too. 
And emotions of the present, such as fear, to me and you. 

Our melancholic temperaments, our passions and our moods. 
Our voluntary actions and imaginations crude. 
Make us recognize, Psychology, a fact that grieves us sore. 
That except in passive memory we'll see thy face no more. 



132 



ANALYTICS SONG 



TUNE: ''Upidee. 



ft 



O 



Chorus: 



UR bark is bound for an unknown shore, 

Far away, far away ; 
Infinity we'd know still more. 

While we may, we may. 
And Analytics shall be our guide, 
As o'er the waves of space we ride. 



Analytics, now to thee, 

Thee we sing. Guide us o'er, 
Over Mathematics's sea, 

To the shore, the shore. 
Where we long so much to be, 

Infinity — ity — itee. 
Where we long so much to be. 
Infinity — itee. 

Hyperbola's central point we'll take, 
Whence to start, whence to start ; 

And find the angle the axes make 
For our chart, our chart. 

Then sail along the asymptote, 

To meet the curve in a point remote. 



133 



Parabola's centers there we'll see, 

H and K, H and K. 
Straight lines from there will circles be, 

So they say, so they say. 
For Mathematics' heaven 'tis. 
Where everything harmonious is. 

Perhaps we'll visit another plane, 

Off in space, off in space. 
Off where imaginary points do reign 

In their place, their place. 
We'll see how a real line passes through 
Imaginary points, and real points, too. 

Infinity our goal shall be, 
There to dwell, there to dwell. 

New visions there perhaps we'll see. 
Who can tell, can tell? 

For there the answers may appear 

To questions we can't answer here. 




134 



o 



ANGLO-SAXON SONG 

TUNE: — ''Reuben, Fve been Thinking.'' 

GOOD-BYE, ye ancient jo-stems, 
Ja-stems, n-stems, r-stems, too, 
A-stems, o-stems, wa-stems, wo-stems, 
Nouns in p and nouns in u. 



Chorus: 



Niman nom, nomon, numen — 
Wha whaes whaem, and whone whi! 

Cuman com, comon cumen — 
Se paes, paem, and pone py. 

Non-thematic verbs and ablauts, 
Preterite presents and verbs in e, — 

These with sundry other tortures, 
Vanish now from memory. 

Now good-bye, thou tearful Wanderer, 
Now farewell, O Caedmon dear, 

Blessed Andrew, pious Abraham, 
For you we wipe away a tear. 

And we all have '* bean ** a- thinking 
That our joy would be complete 

If the teachers in this College 
Would take points from Dr. Sweet. 



135 



AS FOUND IN OUR MAIL 

Mr. Safford Hall. 

To Preceptress of Holyoke Seminary. 
Prof. E. B. Prentiss, Esq, 
To the Bulletin Director. 
Holyoke Female Seminary. 

Miss Marion Woodward, The Worrying Freshman. 
The Principal of Mount Holyoke (late Mary Lyon's) College, in 
South Hadley, Mass., U. S. A. 

Mount Tom School for Girls, Holyoke, Mass. 




136 



HOURS WITH BEST AUTHORS 

ONE OF THEM 

Scene : Williston Hall. 

Time : One hour a day, four days a week throughout first semester. 

Dramatis Personam : Class and Instructor. 

(Enter class stealthily and rapidly fill back row. Silence drops 
heavily.) 

Instructor: — We will resume the discussion of classicism. Miss 
Devereux, will you give us the distinction between classicism and 
romanticism ? 

Miss Devereux: — Why 

Ins.: — 'Why* is supererogatory, Miss Devereux. 

Miss Devereux (her teeth chattering): — Well 

Ins.: — Really, Miss Devereaux, that adds nothing, and may easily 
be dispensed with. 

Miss Devereux (grasping the chair): — I think 

Ins.: — We do not care to hear what you think. If you know some- 
thing definite, we will be delighted to listen. (Miss Devereux is carried 
out carelessly by friends.) 

Ins.: — Miss Arnold, can you answer this question? 

Miss ^ r«^/fl? (starting) : — I beg your pardon? 

Ins.: — Will you state the distinction between classicism and 
romanticism ? 

Miss Arnold: — Romanticism is weird. 

Ins.: — Miss Smith, Miss T. Smith. 

Miss Smith: — Romanticism reminds me — that is — I always think — 
doesn't it strike you as being like Ibsen ? It — it — classicism — uh — is 
more like Marion Crawford — or — Kipling or — uh — Fielding in Tom 
Jones, if not Chaucer and the RoUo books. 

137 



/«j..-— Really. Miss Smith, classicism is not exactly 

Miss Smith: — The same thing as romanticism ! 

Ins.: — Thank you, Miss Smith. That is hardly what I had intended 
to say. It is quite true however. And I may say in this connection, that 
the Rollo series of which Miss Smith has spoken, also the Elsie books 
are works which should be found in the library of every English speak- 
ing man and woman who respects regularity, uniformity, precision and 
balance. Miss Cole, will you take up the discussion? 

Miss Cole: — Suppose we consider classicism as it is represented by 
the Greek authors, for instance Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Lysias, 
Socrates, Aristophanes and many others with whom I am acquainted, 
but too numerous to mention ; or by Dryden, Swift, Pope, Wycherley, 
Congreve, Steele, Addison, it makes no difference which one of these I 
select to illustrate my point, but I thought I would use Addison. I find 
that to the absolute, abstruse and undeviating beauty of his artistic form 
is manifestly added the essentially accidental and tranquil charm of 
familiarity. That I understand perfectly. Moreover, the desire of 
beauty being a fixed element in every artistic organization, is it not 
obviously the addition of curiosity to the desire for beauty that consti- 
tutes the present temperament and qualification for romanticism — which 
by the way I forgot to mention, and, if so, why not? 

his,: — That is true. Miss Cole. Is it now perfectly plain to all the 
class? If not. Miss Cole will 

Miss Cole (cheerfully) : — I should be very glad to add 



(Bell rings. Class leaves hurriedly, carelessly overturning chairs.) 



188 



I 



END (OF THE SEMESTER) RIMES 

T is a wretched Williams man, 

And he gazeth o'er the fence. 
** By thy locked gates and silent tower, 

Am I losing quite my sense ? 

'* 'Twas yester week that I was here, 

'Twas yester week,'* quoth he, 
*' These halls were bright with youth and light. 

The campus rang with glee. 

" But wherefore now this utter calm, 

O, why this awful gloom ? 
The witched ' palaces ' do reek 

With the silence of the tomb." 

He beats his steed, his milk-white steed ; 

The golden spurs strike deep. 
He clears the bound, he pranceth round. 

His silken trappings sweep. 

The bare trees moan and stretch their arms. 

The sky is cold between. 
The windows with their vacant stare 

Like dead men's eyes do seem. 

He knocketh at the barred door ; 

The ghastly echoes leap 
Like dancing devils all let loose. 

And clattering in their sleep. 

139 



His eyes grow fixed and strange with fear, 

His face is pale and wan, 
His steed stands still as any stone, 

He will, but can't be, gone. 

When lo ! three phantoms trailing by 

Awake his numbing sense. 
He holds them with his glittering eye, 

**0 spirits, fade not hence, 

' * But tell me where my Josie is, 

O, speak, and break this spell! 
O, tell me what this silence means, 

This magic deep as hell!" 

They swish their mops, they gaze, and gaze. 

**0, tell me ere I die!" 
'* The Day of Sleep for Colleges!" 

The wind moans back their cry ! 




140 



w 



LINES 

HO kneads our bread at break of day ? 

Who bakes it in a skilful way ? 
Who roasts our turkey, too, they say ? 
Mr. Lyman. 



Who takes our packages to town ? 
Who brings us hat, and coat, and gown? 
Who asks for payment right straight down ? 

Mr. Thayer. 

Who asks us all to go to ride ? 
Who brings us milk and more beside ? 
Who takes in us especial pride? 

Mr. Byron Smith. 

Who orders for us daily fare ? 
Who when we want him's never there ? 
Who cashes checks with zealous care ? 

Mr. Hill. 

Who makes our plants grow fresh and green ? 
Who in golf stockings oft is seen ? 
Who lectures, quizzes too, I ween? 

Mr. Kinney. 



141 



HANDY DICTIONARY 

GRID'S. — ** That extensive emporium across the way." Sweet. 
Eln's. — A wayside inn. 
Bullets — Preserved plums. 

Sinkers — Doughnuts put out for lunch. 

Pepper-box — A spoon holder. 

Grape shot — Preserved cherries. 

S. T. B.— Saint to boot. 

U. P. M. — "United Presbyterian Ministry." Corwin. 

F. R. — Faculty rusher. 

F. P.— Faculty pet. 

Founder s Day — ' * Thanksgiving day because Mary Lyon was 
born." Sweet. 

Deacon Porter's Hat, felt or straw — A boiled suet pudding, some- 
times white, sometimes black ; sometimes soft, sometimes hard ; some- 
times containing raisins, sometimes not. 

Flunk — Ask any college student.* 

C. Y. S. — Consider yourself squelched. 

Matin&e — See Miss Goldthwaite. 

Mud. — Stiffened cocoa served for dessert with mock cream. 

Pie — See Mabel Masters. 

Sublimity — What is sublimity? 

Wiggle — A substitute for LePage's glue. 

Freshman's tears — An article of diet that explains itself. 

Ike — See Eleanor Long. 

Baby's Flannel Blanket, trimmed or untrimmed — Cornstarch 
pudding with or without froth. 



Exception, Florence Chamberlain. 

142 



AN INCREDIBLE TALE 



THE Junior and Freshman were waiting for the quorum to 
assemble.* 

**Do you know,'* asked the Junior, **what weird thing hap- 
pened to me the other night? " 

The Freshman gave an awed nodf of negation. 

"Well," continued the Junior, '' I died." 

** I wouldn't have believed it," said the Freshman solemnly, after 
her first astonished gasp, ** if anyone but you had told me." 

" Of course not, but it was the most real sensation I ever 
experienced." 

"Then you know what Heaven is like," the Freshman orbs 
gleamed expectantly, "tell me about it." 

" I can't," said the Junior, " I didn't go there, I went to " 

" H . Hu-ush-sh." The Freshman was pale, "don't say it, I 

know, how very d-diverting ! " 

"You don't know either," said the Junior scornfully, " how could 
you think it? I went to piggatory." 

"Purgatory you mean," corrected the Freshman cheerfully, "O 
that's not so bad." 

" Purgatory nothing! " the Junior was very indignant. " I tell you 
I went to piggatory! " 



*They should have been out on a scoutinj? tour with everyone rise. Only the president is privileged 
to remain in the hall while the quorum is chasing itself around the campus. 
Mwa/ iM</ poetic prose, an unparalled exaitiple. 



tor five awful minutes the Freshman pleaded for pardon and the 
rest of the story. At last Jove nodded — that is the Junior relaxed. 

'* Before your day," there was still upper-class haughtiness in her 
tone, ** there was an artistic mill at the foot of Lake Nonotuck. Its 
exterior was painted by the art classes, and a worthy friend of the 
College kept pigs in the interior. Pigs were also kept in each room of 
the old building, in which historic edifice I spent ten very long days, 
and which history, every visiting alumna, and every new speaker in 
chapel continually makes mention of as being destroyed by fire in the 
fall of eighteen ninety-six." 

•*Yes," meekly interposed the Freshman, "Fve heard about 
that." 

••Well, the mill was destroyed, and likewise the mill pigs, in the same 
century the College home was destroyed and the majority of the College 
pigs. The shades lacked accommodations for them all, so they estab- 
lished a branch piggatory on the site of the old mill. The other night, 
after I had returned from the spread in your room, I died. My room 
was all in heaps, but I had to leave it and be wafted across the lake. It 
was creepy, that time of night. I landed, at least my spirit did, on the 
old wharf, and before I could decide which was forward, back, and side- 
ways — not being able to differentiate nose from back hair, in terms 
of shadows — I was surrounded by these queer shades of the pigs. 
There were two opposing forces, for between the mill pig shades and 
the College pig shades there has always been war to the toothless bittei * 
end. The mill pigs were white with curly smoke-wreaths of tails, 
the College pigs, in upholstered elegance, were woodenly awkward, 
and came toward me in short, stiff leaps. 

•* ' She's ours!' squeaked the mill pigs. 

'• * She's ours!* mouthed the College pigs. 

• * Then it dawned on me overwhelmingly that I was the shade of 
a pig. 

•• • She doesn't look like either of us,' grunted the chief mill pig. 

•• • Let's try the inquisition,' suggested the chief College pig. 



* Toothless bitter; striking combination of paradox and word play. 

U4 



" They escorted me to a knoll, of whose dewy dampness Jmy shade 
was dimly conscious. Then the questioning began. I must answer 
with yes or no, and the side which won from me the most'^affirmatives 
would take me as a companion shade for ever and ever and ever. The 
mill pigs had the first question. 

** 'Did you ever squeal?' 

** *Yes.' I was forced to admit it. 

tt «Were you ever sat upon?* this from the College pig. 

" *Yes — only to-day.' 

** 'Did you ever bristle up?' 

** *Yes, — my unfortunate temper!' 

14 <Were you ever kicked under the table?' 

** *Yes.* I thought of my breaks at table Freshman year. 

** 'Did you ever have pink eye?' 

•**Yes,' 

*• 'Were you ever present at a spread?' 

** 'Yes.' I couldn't help groaning here. 

" 'Did you ever eat too much?' 

*«*YesT-Oyes!" 

" 'Were you ever burned out?' 

" 'Yes.' 

"Here the questions stopped, and there was worse confusion, for I 
had answered all in the affirmative." 

"The meeting will please come to order. We now have a quorum. 
The first business to come before the meeting is " 

"Please tell me what happened next," whispered the Freshman. 

"What happened next! Shades of the artistic Henry James, you 
want to know what happened next! And you don't appreciate my 
artistic denouement!" The disdainful Junior turned her whole 
attention to the business. 



145 



LUMBRICUS AND THE STUDENT 

SAID the Student to Lutnbricus, ** I must make a slide of you 
For to study 'neath the microscope with care. 
I must take from oflF your somites a nephridium or two." 

And she set to work, not thinking how she*d fare. 
She was not a Shark, nor Dig, nor yet a Grinder, 
But a girl in the Zo. Lab. who at worms did often dab. 
With her implements marked Student Whatername. 
Said the Student to Lumbricus, * * T ve done miracles before 

With the insect I dissected weeks ago. 
And what I have done one time I can do a million more, 

'Tho* you wiggle think not you can balk me so. 
It is neither artful nmgic, luck nor science. 

It is just a simple mixture of the same. 
Practiced by a girl (with her hair all out of curl). 

And Lumbricus was dissected by Student Whatername. 
There were hours that no one talked of, there were times of horrid 
doubt. 

There was faith, and hope, and groaning, and despair. 
While the student cut it open, and she laid Lumbricus out. 

And could not find a single funnel there. 
That was an awful way o' doing business. 

But it happened to the others just the same. 
For some were prone to shirk, and they did not love to work, 

And they sympathized with Student Whatername. 
Said the Student to Lumbricus, ** I shall have to give it up, 

I thought you dull and nasty from the start." 
So she emptied out the color from her little porcelain cup, 

The alcohol, which made that earth-worm smart 
At his death, was corked and put upon the shelf. 

Where it had been before the Student came. 
And she threw Lumbricus out in a jar near the water spout. 

So ends the tale of Student Whatername. 

146 



WHITHER WE ARE TENDING 

IN 1896 



M 



IN 1898 



IN 1902 



EEKER than Moses, 

Green, but subdued. 
With reverence for Seniors 

Deeply imbued ; 
Ever a prey to a 

Sophomore's tricks, 
Loyal to Juniors, 

Although in a fix. 

The Freshmen who entered in '96. 

Big as they make them. 

Fresh but O. K., 
Squelch every Senior 

Passing their way ; 
Sophomores aren't in it. 

That's sure as fate ; 
Run o'er the Juniors — 

Sorry— can't wait. 

The Freshmen who entered in '98. 

Poke up the faculty. 

President, too, 
Tell the trustees what 

They'd oughter do ; 
Watch upper classmen. 

Lest they say boo. 
Make the place too hot 

For me and you. 

The Freshmen who'll enter in 1902. 



147 



"L 



THE QUEST 

INGER, fair maiden, and tell me, I pray, 

Why so fleetly and featly you foot it to-day? 
On frolic so jolly, or errand of state? 
One moment, I prithee, fair maiden, to wait!" 
Then sank down the maiden in dreadful despair, 
All flushed was her face and all rumpled her hair. 
** Oh, in pity's name, tell me," exhausted she cried, 
** If some of my classmates you have not espied? 
*• * Engaged,* seals each door I was wishing to ope, 
The walks are deserted, I'm fast losing hope, 
And yonder where brightly that gas-jet doth burn, 
A small faithful band now awaits my return." 
**And what the occasion. Oh maiden," I said, 
* * That arouses such feeling, such anguish and dread ?" 
She was fast fleeing from me, but cried, looking back, 
*'A special class meeting, alas! and alack!" 




148 



DRAMA 

*MARY LYON CLOCK 

DRAMATIS PERSONiE 

Bold Brave Heroine, .... MiSS Drew. 

Frivolous Titter er, . . . MiSS Hapgood. 

Bell Girl, . . . . . Miss Gysbers. 

ACT I. EXPOSITION OF ACTION 

Scene. — Path before SaflFord. Dark. Plenty of snow lavishly used 

without regard to expense. 

F. T.: — **0h, dear! I wish we'd left Rockefeller a little sooner." 
B, B. H.: — **Well, that rarebit was awfully good, anyway. We'll 

get home in plenty of time. They never lock the door till ten." (Initial 

impulse given as Mary Lyon clock strikes ten. B. B. H. and F. T. 

begin to run, shrieking wildly.) 

ACT II. ASCENDING ACTION 

Scene. — Outside Porter front door. Still dark, and snow still in 
evidence. 

B. B. H:—'' The door's locked!" 

F. T.:—'' I told you so." 

B. B. H,: — *' How are we going to get in?" 

F. T. : — * * Tell you what ! Let's go around and wake up the Bell Girl. 
She'll let us in all right." 

ACT III. CLIMAX 

Scene. — Still outside Porter. Same accessions. A line of windows 
in view. 



^Thouflrb Mary Lyon Clock appears but once, it should be considered dramatically as exerting the 
dominating influence throughout. 

149 



B. B. H. (Makes scientific hard snowball and throws with giant 
strength against Faculty window. Shouts): — •• MissGysbers! !" (F. T. 
frivolously titters for some moments, and at last falls exhausted into a 
snowdrift. Continues to titter. B. B. H. continues to throw snowballs 
and shout): — " Miss Gysbers!" 

F. T. (gasps) :— ' * Isabel ! Stop ! ! " 

B. B. H. (with injured dignity):-* 'Well, I guess I ze/^^n'//" (Still 
plays ball.) 

F. T.:—'' Please stop! Those are the Faculty windows !*' (B. B H. 
Her expressions of horror omitted. Left to imagination.) 

ACT IV. DESCENDING ACTION 

Scene. — The same. 

(B. B. H. meekly stands aside while F. T. throws a piece of ice 

against Bell Girl's window. Loud crash. Scream from within, then 
silence. They wait anxiously, but Bell Girl more unresponsive than 
than the Sphinx. Scene ends in blank despair.) 

ACT V. CATASTROPHE 

Scene. — Before Porter front door. 

(B. B. H. stands with nose pressed against glass, gazing within. 
F. T. does the same.) 

Both:—'' Where can she be?" (Cautiously wails) *'Mlss Gysbers ! ! !" 
(Long pause. Footsteps approach. Bell Girl appears, pale with fright 
and trembling like a leaf. B. B. H, and F. T. frantically try to attract 
her attention. At last succeed and she opens door. They fall inside.) 

Bell Girl: — ** Wh — wh — why! I was so scared when I heard that 
noise I ran right into the dining room, and I've been there ever since. 
I was just going to ask Miss Bradford what it was!" 

SLOW CURTAIN 



150 



VALENTINES 

A VALENTINE 

SHE'S a bonnie little lassie 
With sunny eyes so blue 
And heart so full of love, dear. 
She makes me think of you. 

With hair all yellow meshej^ 

And voice like honey dew, 
In day shine, in the night shine. 

She makes me think of you. 

In dreams, and dark, and shadows, 

And in the free shine too. 
When hearts hold fast their loved ones, 

She makes me think of you. 

And oh, my life, I love her! 

If her heart only knew! 
But yet, 'tis strange to tell it. 

She makes me think of you. 

And now you say I'm ** faithless," 
And that ** my life's not true;" 

You jealous little goosie — 
Why cajit you see it's you? 



152 



THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE STAR FISH 



A 



LITTLE star fish once there was 
Who had five rays quite proper ; 
He passed his Summer near Wood's Holl 
With his mammar and his pappar. 

There was a learned maiden too, 
Who spent her summers there, 

And studied star fish, worms and such ; — 
Ah me ! but she was fair ! 

And once when she was catching crabs 

She paused beside the rock 
Where the little star fish lived in peace — 

It gave him such a shock ! 

And though Brooks, Bumpus and the rest 

State that he had no heart, 
The sight of this maid's lovely face 

Sent thrills to every part. 

He languished sadly from that day ; 

His top ray shorter gjew. 
The two rays of his bivium 

Were disappearing too. 

And when again beside that rock 

The maiden chanced to row 
There was a little throbbing heart — 

Because he loved her so ! 

And if that little fish whose nerves 

Were very, very small 
Was thus affected, how am I 

Who have brain, nerves and all? 



153 



And so upon this joyful day 

Sacred to Valentine, 
I lay my heart low at your feet, 

And ask if you'll be mine. 



M 



CHARADE 

TO H. B. 

Y first was a maiden well-known of old, 
Her beauty, a snare to her suitors bold. 
My second brings thoughts of summer hours. 

Of swaying vines and fragrant flowers. 

My third is a need of Holyoke College, 

Without which, vain are the charms of knowledge. 

My whole is a maiden of modem days, 

In praise of her I sung these lays. 



o 



LADY fair, to whom capricious chance 
Assigns me for thy Valentine to-day. 
Accept, I pray, my loyal tribute, due 
To youthful charm and maiden purity. 

I may not woo thee, but I bring sincere, 
Warm-hearted wishes for thy happiness ; 
A friendly love for one but newly known, 
An earnest prayer for all best gifts of Heaven. 

154 



Out times are not our own : we cannot tell 
Just how or where, or by what road, our lives 
Shall find their full fruition ; but we know 
That in God's service all things work us good. 

And so, fair Valentine, be it with thee : — 
A blessed life of long, love-lighted days, 
Filled with high joys and noble usefulness, — 
A faithful service, and a starry crown. 

(Dr. Young.) 




A VISIT TO INFINITY 

HOW I had longed and longed really to know Infinity, that myste- 
rious place, where no one had ever been, and about which no one 
knew anything, and yet of which so many wonderful things had 
been told. And at last my longing was satisfied. 

I awoke one morning to find myself in Infinity, and my sensations 
were rather those of wonderment than of pleasure. So many things 
were here of which I had only heard before. To my right I saw, 
embracing rapturously at meeting, all the parallel lines which had 
always travelled so stolidly side by side in the world I formerly knew. 

But wonderful as this would once have seemed to me, it was cast in 
the shade by what straightway befell me. I was accosted by an asymp- 
tote, who wanted to know who I was, and whence I came. ** Good Mr. 
Asymptote," I stammered, ** Fm a being from the land where they study 
Conic Sections, and I suppose I must be at Infinity." The asymptote 
was delighted to be thus recognized, and placed himself immediately at 
my disposal, whereupon I asked him to explain Infinity to me. 

From this obliging asymptote, I learned that there is an order of 
nobility in Infinity, the rank of a curve depending not upon its degree, 
but upon the number of asymptotes it has in finite space, for many 
curves, " not living up to their possibilities," do not send as many 
asymptotes to finity as they might, consequently their rank is lowered. 

I could understand by the tone of his voice that the asymptote pitied 
the parabola, whose asymptote was obliged to remain always and entirely 
at Infinity, while for the circle and ellipse, those poor curves which not 
only never can remain at Infinity themselves, but also have to be con- 
tent with imagining their asymptotes, his scorn was great. Of course 
the one ambition of all straight lines is that some day they may arrive 
at the dignity of asymptotes. 

166 



** I am myself a hyperbolic asymptote," said he, drawing himself up 
proudly. *• I have an immense family of hyperbolas, all very depen- 
dent upon me. They follow me round all the time. Don't you see 
them?" I had noticed these satellites of the asymptote, but had not 
recognized them, and now it dawned upon me what the matter was. 
Their vertices were in finite space, and I could see only their branches. 

While I was pondering on these things, the asymptote cried out, 
** Here comes a curve of the third degree, which has been to finite 
space. Look out!" He dodged to avoid it, as it went sailing by. In 
so doing, he knocked me over, and I felt myself sliding down the curve 
of one of his hyperbolas, back into Finity. 



APPLIED QUOTATION 

OH the years we waste and the tears we waste, 
And the work of our head and hand, 
Belonged to the woman who did not know 
(And now we know she never could know) 
And never could understand. 



Where art thou going, Minnie dear, Minnie dear, 
Where art thou going, charming Minnie, 

With thy Boston bag so fine, 

And umbrella, rain or shine ? 
Dost thou carry them to meals, careful Minnie? 



167 



GLEANINGS FROM FIRST FRESHMAN CLASS 

MEETING 1898 

ARDENT Freshman: ** Miss, oh, I mean Madam Chairman." 
A motion is made. Excited Freshman: **0h, we don't want 
that! We want"— 

Chairman elected. Questioner from the back of the room, applaud- 
ing vigorously : *' Who is she? " 

Motion made and seconded that nominees move forward. No 
result. Motion made and seconded that nominees please move forward. 
Carried. 

** Madam Chairman, I move we adjourn as the room is too hot 
anyway, and we are tired with lots of work on tomorrow." Carried. 



w 



HEN my room-mate loves me fondly 
Sweetly whispers she, ** my dear! " 
Then 1 know she wants some fudges — 
Strange she makes it all so clear ! 



But 't is stranger when I tease her, 
Though she never sheds a tear. 

Yet she blushes — shakes her finger — 
Sputters wildly — ^guess! — ** My dear/** 

But what bewilders me most deeply 
Are the words that scorch my ear 

When she*s cross, and says I'm awful — 
In crushing accents comes ** My dear!" 



158 



SCENES FROM TWELFTH NIGHT 

CLASS OF NINETY-EIGHT 
Mount Holyoke College, March 15, 1898 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Or si no, Duke of liiyriay 

Maholio, Stcivard to Olivia, 

Sir Andrew Agneeheek, 

Sir Toby Beleh, Uncle to Olivia, 

Fabian, Servant to Olivia, 

Clown, Servant to Olivia, 

Curio, Gentleman Attending the Duke, 

I Viola, 
Attendants, s Olivia, 

( Maria, Olivia s Woman, 

Scene I. — Room in Duke's Palace. 
Scene II. — Cellar in Olivia's House. 
Scene III. — Room in Olivia's House. 
Scene IV. — Olivia's Garden. 



Miss Nell. 

Miss Burleigh. 

Miss Mitchell. 

Miss Congdon. 

Miss Baldwin. 

Miss Jay. 

Miss Roeth. 

Miss Richards. 

Miss Latimer. 

Miss Campbell. 



159 




ALICE IN WONDERLAND 

MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 
Tuesday Evening, November 15, 189I 

Given by the Junior Class 



Scene L- 



1 Introduction, 

f Advice from a Caterpillar, 
Scene IL — Pig and Pepper. 
Scene III— A Mad Tea Party. 
Scene IV.— The Queen's Garden. 
Scene V. — Advice from the Duchess. 

Scene VI. — The Mock-Turtle's Story, and the Lobster Quadrille. 
Scene VII.— Who Stole the Tarts? 
Scene VIII.— Finale. 




I'ROVHRBS IN PORCELAIN 



AUSTIN DOBSON 
Set Forth by the Class of [901 
MOUNT HOLYOKE COLLEGE 

DECEMUER 13, 1S98 

A Sfcvres Phantasie 
Dramatis Persona 



HorUnse, 

Ninette {fur maid), 

Armande, 

Ninon {her Maid). 

The Ablu' Tirifi, 

Monsieur L'Eloile, 

Momieur Lopal, 

Scene L — Garden of a Monastery, 
Scene IL Salon of Armande. 



Miss Anna Ogden. 

Miss Margaret Steen. 

Miss Emilv Bettes. 

Miss Florence Wilder. 

Miss Anna Moore. 

Miss Harriet Dyson. 

Miss Eleanor Oliver. 



101 



LIINES WRITTEN ON THE SECOND OF FEBRUARY 



T 



HERE was a Junior passed me by, 

Her face was pale to see. 
Now prithee tell me, Junior, 

What is it aileth thee ? 
The tired Junior raised her eyes 

And sadly shook her head. 
Rij^ht mournfully her accents fell, 

And this is what she said : 



**Oh the independent, analytical, 
Thoughtful, intellectual, critical. 
Careful, accurate, individual, 

Unprejudiced study of Keats.** 



** What meaneth this?" I asked amazed, 

* * These accents strange and wild ? 
O do not haste away so fast, 

I pray thee stay, my child.'* 
The Junior slackened not her steps. 

She left me far behind, 
But still these words were borne to me 

Upon the wintry wind : 

** Oh the independent, analytical. 
Thoughtful, intellectual, critical. 
Careful, accurate, individual, 

Unprejudiced study of Keats.** 



162 



IN PSYCHOLOGY 

PROFESSOR — ** Please write rapidly in order whatever occurs to 
you, do not stop to think." (Ten minutes of leaking pens and 
brains.) 

Professor — ** Miss B , please read what you have written." 

Miss B * * There is a story told of a fair maid who was so fair 

that she was just and so just that she was just so and being just so she 
was perfectly upright she was never known to lie neither was she set 
in her ways preferring to settle in her nest and yet she never clucked 
not being a hen though some called her a duck and some a goose 
albeit she neither hissed nor yet quacked but gobbled though not 
being a turkey the cause of her gobbling and her favorite exclamation 
were identical namely fudge. But to go on with my tale or perchance 
to stop and wag it I should have to be either waggish or doggish but 
since this is only — what? O* curs — " Here she paused for breath, the 
bell rang, and some time later the gardener helped the steward carry 
the Professor and class home on one of the Art History screens. 



I 



*M a very wee little atom. 
With only comparative weight, 

But, ye learned scientists, 
I'm greater than the great. 

An infinitesimal unit, 
A sizeless little might. 

The Sophomores fled before me ; 
I flunked them left and right. 

163 



SPARKS FROM THE FIRE 

44f^UN for the boiler! Run for the boiler!" calmly shrieked 

J[\ Porter's excited matron, and straightway Miss P sends 

for the engineer. Her next thought is of the fire alarm, and 
ignoring the "rung of the chair", she breaks the glass with her bare 
hand. Then rushing wildly to M. McK.*s room, she sees her clothing 
safe in Safford, and falls exhausted. 

Meanwhile C. S. and L. T. are quarreling in the bathroom as to 
the relative merits of hot and cold water as a fire-extinguisher, not 
knowing in their Freshman ignorance that ** of course hot water would 
make the fire burn brighter." 

J. T. '99, profiting by former experience, stands in her doorway 
handing out wet wash-cloths to the passers-by. 

The engineer, approaching with hasty steps, comes in contact with 
Dr. C, working in a lowly position with a hand-grenade, and a mutual 
surprise results. 

But of all sad words of tongue or pen the saddest are these, eighteen 
pictures of were lost. 



The nincteenUi fortunately remained safe in the back of her watch. 

164 



W^ TH 

1^ 



THE WESTERN VNIOIV TEI.E( 



THOS. T. ECKEBT. President a 



Receiver's No. I Time Filed 

E- 21 I 9. 15 



SE 



N I' the following messaga subject to the t 
on back hereot, which are hereby agreed t~ 




Tn «--- 






in the traii'i;!:. 
ffccivcd for ■■ 
inierrupuon !■. 
hereby niiul;- ■ 
Company u[i-, 

CoiTCCIlJ 

liy contract in 
niu-s, inadtJi- 
»1^ i.OOO milqv 
vnry the fop^ 

Nci rcsfii 
acccptcj at I 
messengers. 

Mcs,.g, 
delivery at » 

The Cm 
i>ot prcscniet 












Fire at Porter 


Your Phot 


Send nori' immediately. 


1 


f — - 




f Br BEAD THE NO 


riCE AND ACREEl 



I 



'D like to be a grasshopper, 
And sun myself all day ; 

To have no g^rls to chase me round, 
To cut me up, they say. 

rd like to be a Lumbricus, 
And in the cool earth crawl, 

And stick my head above the 
ground 
When darkness covers all. 

I'd like to be an echinoderm. 

With ambulacral feet. 
To have pentameral symmetry, 

And fresh young oysters eat. 



I*d like to be a mollusk, too, 
An oyster, clam or squid. 

And wear a mantle all the time. 
Have eyes without a lid. 

rd like to be a shiny frog, 
A vertebrate, you know. 

And jump about from place to 
place, 
For walking is so slow. 

But best of all I'd be a bird. 
And soar up in the sky. 

To sing sweet songs and try to 
catch 
The college student's eye. 



w 



HEN Wise was a little Freshman green 

She used to go on talking, 

On talking, on talking. 
She talked by night, she talked by day, 

She talked when she was walking, 

Was walking, was walking. 

And now she is a Sophomore 

She still keeps up her chatter, 

Her chatter, her chatter. 
And if she suddenly should stop. 

We'd say, **Why, what's the matter. 

The matter, the matter!" 



166 



AMANTHA SALLEN AT COLLEGE 

WAAL, it do beat all, what a lot of truck them college gals cram 
into one little mite a of room. Naow I went up to that female 
college last June to see my niece Hannah Elizabeth gravitate, 
and sich a time as I hed ! Naow, I know they ust ter drive up from the 
nighest town in a good old fashioned stage, that hed no springs and so 
guv plenty uv exercise. But, naow, if yer'll believe it, they've got them 
new fangled electricized keers that go whizzin* so fast yer can't keep 
your bunnet on straight. They don't hev one big house up there naow 
neither, same's they ust ter when I was a gal. But there's lots uv 
houses a-settin' everywhere, an' they call 'em ** cottages" or **gorma- 
tories". Naow, as for callin' 'em cottages, that's rudiculous, they air as 
big as a good sized mee tin-house, every one on 'em. 

The fust thing Hannah Elizabeth did, when I alit from thet whizzin* 
keer, was to tote me up to her room, up three hul flights of stairs. 
They don't have no carpets or paint on them stairs, and they are just as 
smooth as glas, — tuirible hard to clime up. 

As we's goin* along I kep' smellin' somethin,' smelt like food 
a-bilin, and I says to Hannah Elizabeth, says I, ''Corse I knowed yer 
gals took right holt and helpt abaut the house work but I did n't knows 
yer did the cookin' in yer bed-rooms. Don't they let yer do it down in 
the pantry?" 

You shewd a heerd her laf at that ! * * Why Aunt Amantha, " seys she 
'•They aint cookin', they air just makin' budge or squelsh rabbit" (or 
somethin like thet, she called 'em.) 

" What's them?" I asked, and she laffed agin and said : '* 1*11 show 
yer." 

Waal, by that time, we'd got up to her room, and she opened the door 
fer me ter step in. But land sakes! The place was so full I thought 

167 



they wuz sweepin' and I couldn.t see no place ter step in. There wuz 
tables and cheers and a writin*-desk and a kind uv book case, ( where 
she kep everything, I should jedge from the looks when I turned up the 
curtain.) And away over in one comer wuz a sofa, with a hul pile uv 
square pillers on it. 

** Why," says I, " I thought this was yer bed-room, but I see it's 
yer sitting room. Where do you sleep anyway?" 

** Why, right here. Aunt," says she and pinted to the sofa. 

** Not on that fussy thing," says I "with all them fine pillers." 

** O, I take the pillers off," says she ¥rith a laf. 

*• Waal, I'd like ter know where yer got so meny pillers. Did yer 
cut up your grandmarm's feather-beds? " axed I. ** My! wouldn't she 
be mad, ef she knowd it." 

Over in one comer of the room set a leetle, low table all covered 
with dishes, and a big tin kittle with a cover an* a black handle, ( she 
called it chafin' dish, or some sich name), '* Per the Ian' sakes,'* says I, 
** what d'yer have all them dishes fer, de you eat as well as sleep here?" 

Pretty soon Hannah Elizabeth seys, seys she, "Don't yer want a 

cup of tea?" 

Naow, thet's just what I did want fer I waz nigh beat out, but I 
didn't see no place where she'd bile it. But she fussed round and lit up 
a little kittle she hed there, and she got a round silver thing with holes 
punched in it, and set it in a little might uv a cup, and poured some hot 
water on it. 

Then says she, " Here's yer tea all nice and ready." 

** Ready?" says I, ** where's the tea-part uvit?" 

" O, yer taste and see," and she laffed. 

Then she brought me some square sugar and some lemon all cut up. 

•• Lemon! child," says I, ** What do I want thet fer, I aint seasick 
haint yer got know milk?" 

** Why, no, aunt," she says, ** we use lemon instid." Did yer ever 
hear the likes." 

All round the walls uv her room was fixed a black riggin' that 
looked fer all the world like the fish-net Josiah uset ter use. I knowd 
they hed what they call " fizzical trainin," up there, but I didn't spose 

168 



they taught *em ter fish, specially as I see a sign up in Hannah Eliza- 
beth's room '' No fishin', huntin', or trepassin' on these grounds." 

So I says to her, says I, '' That do look like a regular fish-net, and 
fer the lan's sake what yer got it up there fer?" 

I noticed 'twaz stuck full of gim cranks, — pictures, and dolls, and 
tin horns and sich trash. 

" Why, aunt, that's up to look pretty," she says, ** and ter hold my 
nick nacks." 

'* Huh!" says I, ** Tsh think they would have a nack uv fallin out 
and gittin' nicked." 

'Sides this thing, there waz a lot uv picters up on the wall, painted 
up as fine as our new hen-coop. Hannah Elizabeth seys they waz called 
"posters," and I spose thet's why they's posted up so high yer can't 
hardly see 'em. 

Land sakes! I know yer air tuckered out hearing all this nonsense 
about Hannah Elizabeth and her edication. Waal, I was tew, when I 
wuz there, altho' come to think uv it, I never heerd nothin' bout edication 
when I was ter that college. 



SLAM! bang! crash! ! 
Slide! slip! slam! ! 
Whiz! whang! splash! ! 
Splatter! clatter! jam! ! 

Thafs dishes ! 

A whisk of a broom 

A flurry of dust 
A dab with a cloth 

Because you must 
A little tin dust-pan 

An apron too 
A run to the dust-shaft 

And you are through — 

Thafs sweeping. 



169 




T 



HE niece of the Presideat went to the phone. 

And began to converse, in a very shrill tone, 
But when to her questions no answer she got. 
The telephone boy who was there on the spot 
Said, — ' ' Whydoncherusethereceiver ?" 

E. O. had a party. 

The viands were hearty. 
And none but the Faculty came. 

They sat down beside her. 

But proctors espied her, 
And the Faculty learned the efficiency of the 
student government system. 

Rowena Russel slept late in the morn, 
Her roommate arose too soon. 

Rowena was vexed. 

Moved in the room next. 
And — was interviewed by Miss Cowles a few days later. 

170 



AN EVENING WITH THE LLAMARADA BOARD 

Scene : 34 Safford. 

Time: Wednesday evening. 

(Enter on time Miss Bradley and Miss Hammond. Other members 
come straggling in, with the exception of Miss Canada.) 

Miss L. Mead: — "Are we all here? Where is Mabel Canada?** 

Miss Sargent: — **She has gone to a spread and will be in later." 

Miss Kendall (emphatically): — **We must decide to-night on the 
size of those pictures." 

Miss L. Mead (helplessly to one after another): — **What do you 
think about it?" 

Miss Dougherty: — **How is it in the Vassarian?" (Discussion and 
decision follow.) 

Miss Sargent (who has been talking in an aside with Miss B. Mead.) : 
— **Well, what shall we decide upon?" 

Miss Lane: — ** Did you hear that joke on Miss Nettleton in theism? 
She was asked to distinguish between Mark's Gospel and Matthew's, 
and she said Mark's was more picturesque, because in Mark's the four 
thousand sat down upon the green grass. Then Mrs. Mead asked her to 
characterize Mark in one word, and she said * green *." 

All {very solemnly): — **Oh, yes, that's awfully funny, we must put 
that in." (Miss Canada enters.) 

Miss Canada: — ** Sorry, but I couldn't get here earlier." (Begins a 
side conversation with Miss Sargent.) 

Miss L. J/iftfrf (helplessly) : — ** How shall we arrange these articles?" 

Miss Dougherty: — " Let's see the Vassarian." 

Some One (faintly): — ** It's very warm in here." 

Miss B. Mead: — *' Consult the thermometer." (Raising of window, 
etc., resulting in a change of subject.) 

171 



Miss Kimball: — **Why don't we have more articles sent in?" 
Miss L. Mead: — ** Here is one. (Reads.) 

" 'All the meals ate stale. 
And all the pies and puddings merely hashes, 
They have their exits and their entrances, 
And one dish in its turn plays many parts.' " 

Miss B, Mead: — ** How is the meter of that line?** 
Afiss L. Mead: — 

" Mts act having seven stages. First the chicken. 
All arms and legs, girded with soupy toast, — '' 

Miss B, Mead: — ** That meter isn't good.*' 

Miss Dougherty: — ** Is there anything like that in the Vassarian?** 
Chorus: — "That will never go through, anyway. Let*s not waste 
the time." (Retiring bell rings and Board disperses.) 



CHEAP RECIPE FOR FUDGE 

BORROW one cup of chocolate from your right hand neighbor, ask 
the use of a pound of sugar from your left hand neighbor, and 
borrow the alcohol bottle from the girl across the hall. Keep a 
careful eye open for trays. It is very seldom that there will not be two 
or three in some corridor. If these fail, get butter and milk from the 
matron and promise to pay her in domestic work. Then invite the girls 
whose things you have borrowed to help eat the fudge. When their 
materials are all gone, find some more girls. 



There was a young maiden named Keyes, 

Who thought herself wonderfully wise, 

She gave points to the teacher. 

No squelches could reach her 

This maiden whose surname was Keyes. 



172 



£0" 



tP- 







T 



"«.. ^, \^ 

HIS is the house that Dr. Clapp built. 



This is the Lab that lay in the house that Dr. Clapp built. 




This is the hopper that pined in the Lab that lay in the house Dr. 
Clapp built. 




This is the worm that died with the hopper that pined in the Lab 
that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 




a?- 



This is the fish that was caught with the worm that died with the 
hopper that pined in the Lab that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 




This is the urchin all spikes and dirt, that pursued the fish that 
was caught with the worm that died with the hopper that pined in the 
Lab that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 



174 




This is the cucumber with verdent shirt, that loved the urchin 
all spikes and dirt, that pursued the fish that was caught with the worm 
that died with the hopper that pined in the Lab that lay in the house 
Dr. Clapp built. 




This is the ink squid on the alert to catch the cucumber with 
verdent shirt, that loved the urchin all spikes and dirt, that pursued 
the fish that was caught with the worm that died with the hopper that 
pined in the Lab that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 



^ 



This is the bird that sang in the morn, that banished the ink 
squid on the alert to catch the cucumber with verdent shirt, that loved 
the urchin all spikes and dirt, that pursued the fish that was caught 
with the worm that died with the hopper that pined i n the Lab that lay 
in the house Dr. Clapp built. 




This is the cat all shaven and shorn, that devoured the bird that 
sang in the morn that banished the ink squid on the alert to catch the 
cucumber with verdent shirt, that loved the urchin all spikes and dirt, 
that pursued the fish that was caught with the worm that died with the 
hopper that pined in the Lab that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 




And this is the maiden all forlorn, that worried the cat all shaven 
and shorn, that devoured the bird that sang in the morn that banished 
the ink squid on the alert to catch the cucumber with verdent shirt, 
that loved the urchin all spikes and dirt, that pursued the fish that was 
caught with the worm that died with the hopper that pined in the Lab 
that lay in the house Dr. Clapp built. 



%|B 



t ( 



ROCKEFELLER CHUTE" 



G 



IN a body meet a body, 
Rolling down the ** chute,** 

Gin a body stop a body, 
Need a body toot? 

Every lassie has her tumble. 
Coming down the *' chute.** 

Broken limbs and flying tempers ; 
All the lasses do*t. 



L. T-XB-RV, 1900, considers talking automatic action, since we do 
not know we are talking, and just talk on. 



176 



LITTLE CHATS WITH FRESHMEN 

I. FIRST DAY AT COLLEGE 

(The first of a series of articles by the late Ruth A — hm — e. This 
article will be followed by others on " Reasons for Your Existence," 
••Why You Should Study," ''How to Be Popular, though Class Presi- 
dent," etc., etc.) 

1. Receive kindly the greetings of the Y. W. C. A. Reception 
Committee. They are well meant. These young women will probably 
not take advantage of you, and may possibly prove of some very slight 
assistance. 

2. Do not hesitate to give your check to the baggage man. 

3. Do not omit expressing your admiration of the buildings and 
campus. This is sure to be well received. 

4. Immediately upon arrival, ask your way to the Post Office, and 
inquire for letters. 

5. Look in basements of all the halls for trunks, at intervals of 
two hours. 

6. If engaged in conversation with an upper classman, remark 
carelessly that you were President of your class of five at home. This 
will insure popularity. 

7. If you have a brother at College, state definitely and at once, 
where, of what class, and of what fraternity. This will be well received. 

8. Do not be surprised and grieved if your appreciative comments 
upon pins and other emblems you see are not always pleasantly received. 

9. Remember that the rule that all the Faculty were present at 
the founding of the institution has exceptions. 



177 



T 



WITH APOLOGIES TO BYRON 

HERE was a sound of revelry by night, 

And some of Rockies* maids had gathered then 
Their Banjos and their Mandolins, and bright 

The Welsbach burners shone on girls — not men ; 
Soon many hearts beat happily ; and when 

Music arose with gay and festive swell. 
The chafing dishes came in use again, 

And all went merry as a marriage bell; 
But hush ! hark ! a deep sound strikes like a rising knell. 

Did ye not hear it? — No; 'twas but the wind. 
Or the car rattling down the muddy street ; 

Haste with the fudge! let joy be unconfined ; 
No sleep till ten, when youth and pleasure meet 

To taste the luscious fudge, penuche sweet — 
But, hark ! that heavy sound breaks in once more 

As if the clouds its echo would repeat ; 
And louder, heavier, deadlier than before ! 

Hush ! Hush ! it is — it is — the proctor's warning roar ! 



%|B 



J 



K., *99, one fine day. 
Went to visit the Eden muse6. 
Said a woman, '* Dear me. 
What number is she?** 
So like wax was this Senior, J. K. 

178 




'/hc /\/B.\^eLL J^L'*^A/iJJ/A///£n, 



:■ ;.**i>iiKT'.:^'r';j:',JCif0*jw«W>'y.f*.i-3^ 



1:-. i'-'. wiii J^.u; ■^avc' d. '.Iniirt 

i : t .\f iJc■)nft.lU■.^f . 
i' ."?• Vvfvj-fM -fpKil.i I'Ir.l, p.l 

LA//'W l,>fUi,-m,my Rm,^ *S^ 
3h.- W.„j^ji (R-.ff fm;l,-.i a fc;)< 
n/i ft< i!lnxK{lcyJ\aAc ,!>,•>, J 6<„ 

C^nL vvtTc ottmy lenttwni t) 
5^f »v. ■' 







v«//.w Cow Ny xror 

£.■...■.-.■'■ xv-'/urt 1 Oi,J^n hfoionl 
An.-*. C/c'r/iw. rty Aj/ocI //ic 

r ,V/<' hif v^oJi -Iti-U/ii-i io Cif 

'Jhr i<i1>i) ,iHl >h il^ioi ^jf M . 
ItHt Jillufid w/'ft ■•> /'a(f. 'mk 6.! 

l:^u/" flt»VOJit/y ^/Jof^'T.i ^y ///C 



i'A^ 



ijw, oiSlr-v/njj^ 8 A'fiK'/i! .),■•)!:/,. ■ Till A T|MI>N\.V<..; ') /.i , •,itH if .i iV*XjfE * 



.^ ^.^ . Vt-1 of fil. I . 

Hi1 (Vwlf .v.- II yAXf^, *.'r y^r 1. 



, TTif 







"AS CERTAIN ALSO OF YOUR OWN POETS HAVE 

SAID" 



"E 



ARTH holds no other like to them." 98 

**What a funny little duflfer/* E. R— d, 1901. 



** She has so much muscle and loves so to show it " 

M. L-N-, 1900. 

** The defect in her brain was just absence of mind.** 

E. Warner, 1900. 

** Late, late, so late, but she can enter still.** 

E. D-SBR-w, 1902. 

*'Gold! gold! gold! gold! 
Bright, yellow, hard and cold!** 

Endowment Fund. 

" She had a lovely porcelain understanding." 

E. G L-CK, 1902. 

** My tongue within my lips I rein, 
For who talks much must talk in vain." 

J. Own, *99, 

**And so she treads 

As if the wind, not she, did walk/* 

S. W-TS-N, 1901. 



180 



" O, impudent! regardful of thine own, 
Whose thoughts are centered on thyself alone." 

1900. 

"She'll outstare the lightning." L. St-w-ll, 1902, 

** A sweater not much the worse for wear." K-nn-y, 1900. 

"There's a heap of powerful kicking in the humblest kind of 
mule." K. P-T-RS-N, 1900. 

"All are but parts of one stupendous (w)hole." 

Laundry Bags. 

"She appeared as tall as an ordinary church steeple, and took 
about ten yards at every stride." I. W. — nd, 1901. 

" It was not my fault I was born tired." M. K-nd-rck, 1900. 

" All hope abandon, ye who enter here." 

Chemistry Lecture Room. 

" Man seems the only growth that dwindles here." 

Mount Holyoke College. 

"She sits high in all people's hearts." M. W-ll-s, 1900. 

That's Northern natur', slow an' apt to doubt. 
But when it does git stirred, there's no gin out." 

C. Bl-nch-rd, '99. 

" Going as though she trod on eggs." G. G — dn — gh, 1901. 

" Neat as a pin and blooming as a rose." 

F. S-rg-nt, 1900. 

181 



«< 



t would my horse had the speed of her tongue.'* 

E. H-SK-LL, 1900. 



'• Heaven bless thee, merry child." 



G. Cl-rk, 1901 



' * rveassweetadispositionasanyone, 
Butsakesalive, I hate to be done.*' 

E. -L-x-ND-R, 1902 



"Order is heaven's first law." 



T. Sm-th, 1900. 



**And she was fickle 
As she was fair." 



'* Laughter holding both his sides." 



'* Be kind to thy sister . " 



E. R-B-RTS-N, 1902. 

F. P-RK-NS, 1902. 

J. T-RN-R, '99, 

C. Bl-nch-rd, '99, 

M. H-MM-OND, '99, 
C. P-RTR-DG-, '99, 
F. H-LL-CK, '99, 
M. L — V-TT, '99. 



**I know I am not popular, but I have a high reputation with the 
Faculty, my dear." K. Sh — r-r, '99. 

" We are by no means blind to a proper sense of fun." 

Llamarada Board. 

•' The gentlest and purest creature that ever shed a light on earth." 

M. B-LL, 1900. 



182 



'* It is common for tke younger sort to lack discretion.** 

1902. 

*• Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear." 

L. T-XB-RY, 1900. 

•* Though defeated, she would argue still." 

E. P-TT-R, 1900. 

'* Up! Up! my friend, and quit your books, 
Or surely you'll grow double!" 

C. Edw-rds, '99. 

** I'm one o* them thet finds it ruther hard 
To manufactur' wisdom by the yard." 

H. K-ND-LL, 1900. 

*• Now don't go off half-cock; folks never gains 
By usin' pepper-sauce instead o* brains." 

M. St — RS, 1901. 

**A horse! ahorse! my kingdom for a horse ! " 

A. B-RK-R, 1900. 

•* Full of a nature 
Nothing can tame." 

M. W-S-, 1901. 

' ' Of Roman and of Grecian lore, 
Sure mortal brain can hold no more." 

H. B-w-RM-N, 1901. 

•• O, bring me flowers." 

F. F-xcR-PT, 1901. 

183 



' ' Such songs have power to quiet 
The restless pulse of care." 

College Song Book. 

"'They came to me,' the Senior said, * wow they were flimsy 
things!'" 

Senior Privileges. 

** She hath a lean and hungry look." 

H. Sl — p-R, 1902. 

" Her very foot hath music in't 
As she comes up the stairs." 

E. G — LD, 1900. 

''And then what mischief may arise when love links two young 
people in one fetter." 



{ 



E. M-DDL-TON, 1902, 

M. D-v — s, 1902. 



** Then she will talk — good gods! how she will talk!" 

M. M-ST-Rs, 1900. 

"When one is past, another care we have; 
Thus woe succeeds a woe as wave a wave." 

C. B - -, 1901. 

" One science only will one genius fit." 

V. G-BB-NS, '96. 

" Independence now, and independence /(?r^'^r." 

C. M-ND-M, '99. 

" Her sweet smile haunts me still." 

L. M-RS-, '99. 

184 



" Assist me some extemporal god of rhyme." 

L. R-R-B — CK, '99. 

"See the delightful, lovely, little tootsy, -wootsy, fuzzy-wuzzy, 
popsy-wopsy, honey, ducky darling." 

K. Fr-z — R, 1902. 

''So sweet and voluble is her discourse." 

E. C-v-LL, 1902. 

" And when you stick on conversations burrs, 

Don't strew your pathway with those dreadful urs." 

E. Lo-G, 1900, 

** There the fair lane descends." 

No 31 Safford. 

' ' Last the musician 

Fair haired, blue eyed, her aspect blithe, 

Her figure tall and straight and lithe, 

Every feature of her face 

Revealing her Norwegian race." 

I. M-TS-N, '99. 

•' 'Umble we are, 'umble we have been, 'umble we shall ever be." 

E. H-LL, 1902. 

•* Busily engaged they say." 

R. R-ss-LL, 1901. 

'* It was a pretty picture, full of grace, 
The slender form, the delicate thin face." 

E. H-YW — D, 1902. 

" Her silver voice is the rich music of a summer bird 
Heard in the still night with its passionate cadence." 

E. L w-s, 1901. 

185 



THE SONNET 

SCENE: A small room combining in appearance a library, a dressing 
room, a parlor, a picture gallery, with remote suggestions of yet 
other uses. Couch piled with pillows, white walls draped with 
fish-nets and hung with framed and unframed pictures, banners, pasters, 
photographs and "kodaks.** Girl stands in center of room holding 
"Engaged Sign" and pin. Leaves room but returns instantly minus 
these articles and with look of grim decision seats herself at desk. 
Speaks. 

'* Let's see. I must do that sonnet. I never did such a thing in my 
life; and I am mortally sure I can*t do it now but I suppose I must 
grind out something. If I had a cent Fd be tempted to apply to Col- 
chester, Roberts and Co., but in my case brains come cheaper than 
money — either is scarce enough. Four quatrains — no — three — they are 
four lines each, and two end lines. About my rhymes! Day is an easy 
one and so is see. Guess TU make a list. ( Writes busily) There ! 
those will do — rhymes are easy — and for meter — Oh what did or 
didn't she say? I wish I'd let that letter to Jack go — and listened. 
(Sits for a moment lost in troubled thought) Well — anyway — that 
thing in the car is a sonnet for I found it somewhere — in Browning — 
I think. I can count the words and make mine equal ! Lucky we all 
learned that Mountain Day. (Counts on fingers), 

The world' is too' much with ' us late' and soon' I 

Ten words and every other one of them accented — that's not hard. 
Day — day — day — now the day is over. Why yes evening will be a 
nice subject to moralize on. ( Drops pen and counts laboriously on 
fingers — nodding her head to accent the measures ) 

The glorious sun // gone and' likewise the lovely day' 

( Writes, reads accenting carefully.) It — it doesn't sound like Browning 
read that way — it*s all right read like prose. Well I suppose its poetic 

l&G 



license or sometliing worse tiian umlaut / think ! Jack says — ( after sL 
long pause — she straightens a dreamy smile into a severe frown — and 
resumes work.) Where was I? Oh yes — well — I guess I won't mind 
the accents, I'll just look out for the words. Next rhyme is see — 1*11 
get them mixed up if I don't take them in order — See — see. ( Another 
pause with more finger counting and wry faces ) 

How grand — 
grand is such a lofty word. 

How grand are all the stars to see ! 

Next is she — they call the moon she don't they? I never saw why 
myself. (Still more finger counting) 

Also the lovely moon how beautiful is she ! 

Why this goes like greased lightning — A whole quatrain most 
done — sonnets aren't hard ! Wayv^xny next word —** Homeward the 
weary ploughman plods his way" that comes easy, awfully — so I don't 
believe I made it up! (Despondent — brightening.) Of course I can 
use the idea I Toward home I tread alone my weary way. That would 
do I But only eight words — " Toward home I tread all alone my weary 
way " — There — now I will put them together. ( Copies, reads ). 

The glorious sun is gone likewise the lovely day 

How grand are all the stars to see 
Also the lovely moon how beautiful is she 

Toward home I tread all alone my weary way. 

Oh my ! ( Sighs ) It reads pretty well — but its not like Browning. 
What hard lives poets must lead when it doesn't come natural ! (Springs 
up) I guess I'll go ask Clara to come up and make fudge and talk it 
over. She's bright — and she has some chocolate. There were tin 
trays on the radiator. (Opens door and looks out) yes they're there 
yet and there's just slews of butter on them. ( Hasty exit ). 

In the draught from the open door the curtain sways, casting strange 
shadows on the walls. The honorable gentlemen in gilt frames known 
as Modem Poets seem to smile — even to wink — The unfinished sonnet 
drifts to the floor. 

187 



T 



THE IRONY OF LIFE 

IS pleasant, when to the post office 
With hurrying steps you run, 

To find just a note from the registrar, 
Saying, '* Please to my office come." 

Or when you are wanting a letter 

To cheer you when you have been ill, 
To receive this tender message 
** Arrange your dispensary bill.** 

Or when you ask your senior 
For your class reception's date, 

To hear, *• Tve promised another girl, 
Tm sorry, but you are too late.** 

Or when you are at the table 
So weary, you'd like to stop 

And think of something pleasant. 
To hear folks *' talking shop.** 

Or when you sit in History 

Stupid and ill at ease, 
To meet the teacher's eye and hear, 

'*A special topic, please." 



LOST. — A bow of black and red ribbon ! Finder please return to 
H. H., 1901. 

188 



THE FRESHMAN'S CONTRIBUTION 

A FRESHMAN standing in front of the letter box, holds a manu- 
script in her hand, and soliloquizes as follows : 

•*Dear me, I intended to send this to the Century, but as they 
asked me to write something for the Llamarada, I suppose I ought to 
give it to them. To be sure if it goes in the Century, my name will 
appear in print, while if I send it to the Llamarada no one will know 
who wrote it. The Century would pay me too, ten dollars perhaps. 
I don't suppose they would pay a beginner more, although I am sure I 
don't know how they can tell whether I am a beginner or not. But. I 
must not be selfish, and besides I suppose the Llamarada really needs it 
more. Well, here it goes then. (Drops it in the box.) 

A week later the Freshman is seen to extract a voluminous manu- 
script from her post-office box. She gazes at it fixedly, then amaze- 
ment, wrath and indignation struggle for the mastery while she hoarsely 
gasps, *'The unappreciative wretches!" 

But her face slowly brightens as she murmurs, *' Never mind, I 
shall receive that ten dollars after all." 



T 



TO G. H. McK-NL-Y 

HERE was a young lady at college 
So rapt in her search after knowledge, 
In the annex she sate. 
While supper all ate, 
And studied her lessons for college ! 



189 




SIG. MATSONONIO ET MLEXANDUO 



ingPtr 


f^manu 


7.00 P. M. 


sUp«, 


- ■ 


- €.30 " 



When evening falls npon the land 

And all from work are free, 
Some Safford maids npon the steps 

Sing loud with careless glee. 
From chapel comes a senior stem 

Her words are few, I deem : 
*' We cannot hear Miss Randolph speak," 

Then silence reigns sttpreme. 



A FEW THINGS WORTH KNOWING 

Freshman. — Don't send to the dispensary for excuses on Sunday. 

Professor. — The ** Prince and the Pauper** was not written by 
Dickens. 

Al-c- B-lch-r, 1900 — The Ten Commandments are not found in the 
twenty-fifth chapter of Genesis. 

Professor ,The word untentable is not found in American dic- 
tionaries. 

Ed-th- W-ll — MS, '99. — ) The fresh water hydra is not a plant, 
M-Y Pr-sc tt, 1900. — ) neither is the amoeba a jellyfish. 

Gr-c- W-bb-r. — We do not study the seed cucumber in the first 
course in Zoology. 

Freshman. — Y-e-g-a-s-h-i-r-a is not pronounced Joshua. Cel. Emb. 
on the schedule does not stand for celluloid embroidery. 

Em-ly D-sbr-w, 1902. — We have no intention of grinding every 
one in college. 

(The knot of hair at the extreme back of 
the head is not a peg on which to hang 
one*s hat. 

El-z-b-th G-l-ck, 1902 — China eggs will not become a palatable 
breakfast dish no matter how much they are boiled. 

191 



' . ' f , 1902. — When you find a Greek letter pin on the campus it 
is best to ask the owner's permission before wearing it. 

M-Y L-N-, 1900. — ) Miss Read of the Zoological department is 
M-B-L C-N-D- 1900. — ) not a Freshman. 

Winifred. — A sixteen year old girl should wear her skirts well 
below her ankles, especially if she is very tall. For suggestions as to 
arranging her hair refer to Miss Sleeper. 

Musician. — It is not considered good form to wear more than five 
pins at the same time. 

^ ) If when telling a remarkable story, your hearers 

p I appear to doubt its veracity, do not resent it — some 

' people cannot appreciate the wonderful. 

L — E T-XB-RY, 1900. — Crystals do not grow by accretion after they 
have been made into jewels. 



I. M-TS-N, found last summer cool because she sat on the lake every 
night. 

Kitchen, 
Belle, 

Mouse, 
Yell! 
Belle, 
Chair, 

Mouse, 
Where? 

192 



I 



THE TEMPLE OF NIGHT 

N the first green cool of the evening 

My feet go wandering, still, 
Down the hush of the dusky shadows, 
Through the dear, dim aisles on the hill. 

In the temple of night, in the gloam-lights 

That shadow and shift and turn, 
While afar on deepening altars 

Her holy star- tapers burn. 

The little light leaves brush the darkness — 
There's the dream of a song in the air; 

The little light leaves brush my heart-strings. 
And attune them to the sweetness of prayer. 

And the lilies are faint with swinging. 
Their censers sweet laden with sleep. 

And the day-aches and day-doubts are phantoms 
Even memory fails to keep. 

My sense is steeped in the music 

Of murmuring waters asleep. 
And my heart grows numb with the aching 

Of forgetfulness. And deep. 

Deep in the dark of the Temple, 

In the Temple of Night I kneel. 
Breathless with pain of dreaming, 

Knowing that dreams are real. 

193 




THK MOUNT HOLYOKK 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Janet Sinclair. 

BUSINHSS MANACRR 

Anna Hendricks Rodgets. 

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER 

Harriel MitWdi Hazen. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Alice Townseiid Bidwell, Julia Fiench Owen, 

Msrgsrel Elizabeth Ball, Alice Seymoji Browne. 

Maud I'arepa Pingree. 

19i 




LLAMARADA BOARD 



BUSINRSS MANAGHK 

Florenie Gerlruile Sargent. 

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER 

Helen Idelb Kendall. 

ART EDITOR 
Ida Marion Dougherty. 
LITERARY EDITORS 



Susan Mary Bradley, 
Grace Tremlow Hammond, 
May Rogers Lane, 



Mabel Augusta Canada, 
Eleanor Rosannah Krmball, 
Belle Louise Mead. 



HERE AND THERE 

Miss S — E-— '^What is the first thing you think of in the United 
States government?" 

C. C, 1900 — **Why, the president and all in authority.** 

Miss S — e **Yes, quoting from the prayer book, I suppose it is." 

F. D.. '99 — (coming from political economy) — **What is a bond, 
anyway?" 

J. T., '99 — O, a little piece of paper with a coupon on it." 

Old Alumna (reading notice in Post Office) — ** * For sale, Llamarada 
for '98/ The idea! They charged me a dollar and a quarter at the 
rink." 

M. L., '99 (giving an account of the football game) — *' There are 
six Yale men already, laid up with broken collar buttons." 

Miss Pr-nt-ss (filling out permission blank) — **And at what house 
do you live?" 

R. B., 1901 — ** Pearsons. May I have permission for my room- 
mate, too?" 

Miss Pr-nt-ss — ** Certainly. In what house does she live?" 

**Did they have real chicken at the church supper? 

Somehow, I always suspect a foul proceeding at such times." 

Amy R-b-rts, 1900 (answering absently to roll call) — *' Thank you." 

I. K., 1900, (in History class) — '' The truce of God was an agree- 
ment to fight." 



A. B., 1902, — ** Wasn't it Columbus who discovered that the earth 
was round?" 

Pr-f. (in Physics class) — **What is the boiling point of water?" 

B. M., 1900, **Why, the point where water boils." 

E. G., 1900 — **What did you mean by that question, please?" 
P. H. D. — ** Oh, I didn't mean anything in particular." 

M. W., 1 90 1, (to mourning Freshman) — **I am sorry you are so 
homely and lonesick." 

Prof. — ' * Tenure is the manner of holding everything except 
babies." 

Registrar — **Are the Faculty invited to the Freshman reception?" 

E. P., 1902, (promptly) — **Oh, yes, invited, but they are not 
expected to come." 

M. H., 1902, — **0 girls, we're going to have Metropolitan ice-cream 
for dinner." 

E. G., 1902 — ** How do you get ten per cent, of one dollar and a 
half?" 

M. S., 1901, — "Why, just strike off the one, and then you have fifty 
cents left." 

Freshman (singing college song) — 

' * That is where the maidens fair 
Chase the colic spirit." 

Prof, (reading) — * * Hercules a puero corpus Suum deligenter exer- 
cebat." 

M. W.f *99, (translating) — "Hercules carefully took his body from 
the boy." 

It? 



Notice (given at table in Porter Hall) — **An art book has been 
taken from the library by Dante Gabriel Rosetti. If any girl can give 
information concerning it, I wish she would speak to me." 

F. H., 99,— **Did Dr. Van Dyke set the style for the Van Dyke 
beard?" 

Freshman (translating in Latin class) — **We have all aspired to be 
old maids." 

A Member of Faculty to New Prof. — ** Have you passed your 
Latin examination?" 

Miss V. (to Miss H. returning to room for book) — ** Did you miss 
anything?" 

Freshman — '* Not Miss Anything, it is Miss Hellyar." 

M. M., 1900, — '* How do you ever remember all that Anglo-Saxon?" 

F. C, 1900, — **Why, it is just as easy for me to remember as it is 
for you to forget." 

Freshman (studying Trig. — )**Sine cosine; tangent, cotangent; 
cnat, secant. 

G. McK., '99, (entering Theism classroom) — ''Goodness, tell me 
what book we are studying before I go into class." 



(Copied from a Westfield paper) 

Miss Harriet Dyson of Mount Holyoke spent Wednesday at home. 
Mr. Francis Parks of Yale is also in town. 

198 



QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 



Sub-Group B. 

1 . Substances : 

Soluble salts of 

Deyo, Mead I. and II., Reed, Babbitt, Robinson, Bradley, 
etc. 

2 . Group Precipitant : 

Miss Goldthwaite. 

3. Colors of Precipitates: 

Deyo— ** Vivid Green. 
Bradley—" Yeller." 

Babbitt — Rather a "crush** (strawberry) effect when in 
the presence of the group precipitant. 

4. Method of procedure : 

Roast the precipitates well until they reach the tempera- 
ture of S$fi, Transfer what is left of them to the lab- 
oratory. Pile on concentrated acid remarks until all 
become of a dull blue hue, due to minute particles of 
remorse. Allow to stand and cool for an hour. 
They oxidize to Sub-Group A. 



LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN— Two members of the Faculty. 
FOUND— In the chapel choir. 

199 



NINETY-NINE 

OF all Holyoke*s classes, the best I opine 
Is the Senior, the loyal Eighteen Ninety-nine. 
Our home is a Hill-house with high studded Hall, 
And Fitches grow clustering close by the wall. 
Tho' you say we're all women, it isn't just true, 
For we've Wil's son and Mat's son and Robin's son too ; 
For co-education we reckon still Mower, 
For we number our Edwards and Williams galore. 
Our Gay-lord is fond of the hunt and the Chase, 
Takes Foxes, and Partridges many a brace ; 
Then by merry- Andrews our feast is made brighter, 
By the glee of the banjos our hearts are made Leiter. 
We've a Plumb-tree whose growth has been checked by a Shearer, 
And alas for the Plumb tree, we've also a Sawyer ! 
We've a quarrel with no one, and only one Haight 
And that's to be Owen, a terrible fate; 
Tho' Miles must be travelled to settle a bill 
We've a Way-ave remarking, ** There's a way if a will." 
Class meeting of trouble is our only source 
For we Leav-itt each time with a Mohn of re-Morse.* 
We've a church in our house, with a Dean and a Clark, 
A Vicker-yndustrious, quite worthy remark ! 
And as for our brains, we are far in the van. 
We're all Learned except for a single Woodman ; 
We have Lord Erskine's cousin, philosopher Hume, 
Fitzgreen Halleck's relation, near of kin, I presume; 
And Sir Thomas Malory's ninth cousin, I think. 



*This refers to Miss Morse's habit of moving to adjourn in class meeting. 

200 



And the great lexicographer,* minus the kink ; 
Two artists, one's Turner, but Sargent's the rage ; 
And Booth, prince of actors, still reigns on our stage, 
McKinley is with us, the chief of our land. 
We're right loyal to him^ yet we reach out a hand 
To Bid- well come Japan, and whoever should dare 
To Hide our Yegashira had better beware ! 



*Dr. Johnson. 

Ml 



T 



ENGAGED 

O-MORROW I have a hard exam., 

Please leave me alone and let me cram. 

Here I sit engaged in Physics, 

Please come again and make your visits. 

Ye Seniors, Juniors, passing by. 

As ye were once, so now am I. 

Ye Freshmen who would Sophomores be. 

Prepare for briefs and agon-ee. 

There was a young Soph, named F. May, 
Who sent fudge to a youth far away. 

She*d not met him, I fear. 

Before she came here, 
Nor hears from him since, so they say. 

In the lake: — A splash, a ripple, and a great Lull. 

Lucid Statement from Bosanquet Logic, Vol. IL, P. 212 

"For a nothing can only be invested with the character of a some- 
thing by being a precisely limited nothing that implies positive nature 
in the limiting and sustaining something which is or is involved in the 
nothingness of something in particular." 

202 



REQUIRED WORK IN SHAKSPERE 

First Year — Comedy of Errors. 

Second Year — Much Ado About Nothing. 

Third Year — As You Like It. 

Fourth Year— All's Well That Ends Well. 

1062-64 Chapel St., New Haven, Ct., Feb. 16, '99. 

Dear Miss Mohn : — 

As there is no such day as February 29 this year, will you kindly 
cancel the fifteen appointments you have arranged for that date, and 
oblige, Yours respectfully, 

H. Randall. 

F. C-WLS, *02, when asked her father's occupation, replied, 
** chickens". 

That Freshman must have had a bad attack when she asked at 
** Grid's" for a **box of Beman's and Smith's cough drops." 

When the hands of the chapel clock point to a quarter after eight 
and the clock strikes eleven, we know it is twenty minutes to ten. 

C. L — v-TT, '02, came to college to be independent. 

903 



B. G-L-CK, '02 » has the faculty of speaking '' ezspontaneously ." 

Fanning is to L s- T-xb-ry the ** pan^ea " of all ills. 

The Spirit of Ruth Ashmore: — " I am glad to see so many of my 
dear girls." 

** Applications due to-day," 

Murmured May McKinney, 
** She'll forget it sure, so here 

Goes one for Joe Pinney." 



9H 



Republicanus Romanus 



IDIBUS MARTIUS. 



DE MORTIBUS. 



ROMAE, SUBITO CAIUS 

JULIUS C^SAR, EXSE- 

QUIAE PUBLICAE. AM- 

ICI ROGANTUR NE 

FLORES MITTAN- 

TUR. 



DB CONIURATIO TERRIBILI ! 

DE TRAGOEDIA HORRIBILO ! ! 

DE TUMULTU INSANISSIMO ! ! ! 



Caesar in curia, a turba conspiratorum, 
quorum unus erat eius amicus Brutus 
interfectusestl!!! 

Juxta Pompci simulacrum exclamans, 
" Et tu Brute," occidit. Vulnera tria et 
Tiginti a nuntiatore qui a nobis ad necem 
ioTestigandam statim missus erat, in- 
Tenta sunt. 

In oflBciis supremis quae erunt pub- 
lico, oratio funebris a M. Antonio, 
oratore pereloquente qui lapidi lacrimas 



elicere posse diritur. Nuntiator qui a 
nobis ad viduam miseram alloquandam 

eam fatiscentem invenit. 

Mulier misera cui dicebat. **Eheu, 
eheu. vae mihi miserae !!!! 

Ego periculum exspectabam propter 
horrida quae mihi dormienti, per n^^ctem 
proximam videbantur. Eheu ! Eheu !! 

Ille homo pertinax, cum eum e domo 
non euiret implorarem me deseruit ut 
necessario necaretur Eheu ! eheu ! 

Nunquam rusus ero beata, cum meus 
carus Caesar sit corpus mortuum. 

Eheu! Eheu!! 

Caesar erat mihi percarus quod erat 
provisor generosus quamvis, cum poda- 
grae doloribus arderet perversus esset. 

Eheu ! Eheu ! 

Numquam matrimonio me cum quo- 
quam rursus iungam. Eheu ! Eheu I! 
Vae mihi miserae !!! 

Cum essem Caesaris uxor tertia femina 
sola sum quam ille amabat. Interfec- 
tores eius omnes podagrae doloribus 
pessimis ardeantur !!! 

Cum misericordia a nuntiatore nostro 
viduae miserae oblata esset, ad M. Anto- 
nium ut de oratione funebri cognosceret, 
maturavit. 



205 



CONTENTS 

Alice in Wonderland, . .160 

Amantha Sallen at College, . 167 

Analytics Song, . -133 

An Evening with the Llamarada Board, . 171 

Anglo-Saxon Song, . . . • '35 

Annah May Soule, . 17 

**As Certain Also of Your Own Poets Have Said," . .180 

As Found in Our Mail, 136 

Athletic Association, . . .96 

Baccalaureate Service, 106 

Banjo Club, . . . .94 

Basket Ball Team, 1900, .... 99 

Basket Ball Team, 1901, . 100 

Biological Club, ..... 86 

Board of Trustees, .7 

Boating Club, 102 

Calendar, ...... 6 

Class Day, . . 107 

Comtnenoement Calendar, .106 

Commencement Exercises, 106 

Current Events Club, . .86 

Debating Society, . 75 

Department of Constitutional History and Political Economy, 19 

Drama, ...... 1^9 

End (of the Semester) Rimes, • '39 

E. U. Club, ..... 103 

Faculty, ...... 8 

Few Things Worth Knowing, i^i 



Field Day, . , . . 


97 


Founder's Day, .... 


105 


Freshman Class, 


60 


Freshman's Contribution, 


189 


Gleanings from First Freshman Class Meeting, 


158 


Golf Club, .... 


lOI 


Glee Club, .... 


93 


Handy Dictionary, 


142 


Here and There 


196 


Hours with Best Authors, 


137 


House Dr. Clapp Built, 


173 


I'd Like to Be a Grasshopper, 


166 


Incredible Tale, 


143 


In Memoriam, .... 


69 


In Psychology, 


163 


Irony of Life, .... 


188 


Junior Class, .... 


37 


Lines, ..... 


141 


Lines Written on 2nd February, . 


162 


Llamarada Board, .... 


195 


Little Chats with Freshmen, 


177 


Limbricus and the Student, 


146 


Mandolin Club, 


95 


Mount Holyoke Board, 


194 


Music Course, 


68 


Newell Man's Dinner, 


179 


Nineteen Hundred, 


III 


Ninety-Nine, .... 


200 


•'Notches", .... 


103 


Pedestrian Club, .... 


103 


Proverbs in Porcelain, 


161 


Psi Omega, .... 


85 


Psychology Song, 


132 



207 



Qualitative Analysis, 


199 


Quest, .... 


148 


Republicanus Romanus, 


205 


Rinkle Polo Club, 


lOI 


Senior Class, .... 


23 


Sigma Theta Chi, 


79 


Sonnet, ..... 


186 


Sophomore Class, 


51 


Sparks from the Fire, 


164 


State Clubs. 


87 


Students' League, .... 


73 


Student Volunteer Band, 


92 


Teachers* Course, .... 


68 


Temple of Night, 


193 


Tennis Club, .... 


102 


Things Worth Knowing, 


191 


To Dr. Muir, .... 


131 


Twelfth Night, 


159 


Valentines, 


152 


Visit to Infinity, 


156 


When My Roommate, etc., 


188 


Whither Are We Tending? 


147 


With Apologies to Byron, 


178 


Xi Phi Delta, .... 


80 


Young Women's Christian Association, 


88 



208 




3.0' 

To 



fe repTelflit the Adz & "fdy 

/tt* dte yev (<tya tooK attay 
iial-fiW tSrfK'i will <*W^/ pay 



the 



Axi. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Atherton, 

Babbitt, B. T., 

Ball, C. E., 

Baker, W. M., 

Bard well, Chas. E., 

Barr, the Caterer, 

Boston & Albany Railroad, 

Boston & Maine R. R., 

Bridge Teachers* Agency, 

Bridgman, S. E., 

Brigham, D. H., 

Brodhurst Bros., 

Bryant Press, The, 

Bumham, E. D.. 

Cady, W. F., 

Coe, L. B., & Co., 

Conway, M. P., 

Cotrell & Leonard, 

Dame, Stoddard & Kendall, 

Dean's, 

Draper, 

Eimer & Amend, 

Elmwood Dye Works, 

Esleeck Paper Co. , 

Fay, C. T., 

Fisk Teachers' Agency, 

Fitts, C. N., 

Fitzgerald & Co. , 

Forbes & Wallace, 

''Franklin", The 

Frizzell, Glen C. , 



Holyoke, 

New York, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Northampton, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Florence, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Albany, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

New York, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Northampton, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 



Page. 
28 

17 

27 
18 

3 

31 
29 

7 
23 

4 

2 

21 

9 
18 

2 

16 

22 

30 
18 

2 

7 

15 

34 

9 
6 

23 

13 
I 

6 

18 



210 



Giesmann, A. F., 

Goodall Drug Co., 

Goldsmith & Taft. 

Gridley, C. A., 

Griffith, M. W.. 

Grimmer, C. P., 

Hall, Charies H,, 

Hastings, Dr. H. O., 

Hirt, M., 

Hollander, L. P&Co., 

Horsfall & Rothschild, 

Hotel Hamilton, 

Hotel Vandome, 

Hotel Worthy, 

Howard & Gay lord, 

Howland, E. H., 

Hubbard & Taber, 

Johnson, Henry R., 

Kelton, R. F. & Co. , 

Kennedy & Sullivan Mfg. Co., 

Lambie, J. E.. 

l^mson & Hubbard, 

Liver more & Martin, 

Lyman, E. L., 

McQuillan, Miss, 

Meekins, Packard & Wheat, 

Miles, W. B., 

Morse & Haynes, 

Mount Holyoke House, 

Mount Tom Railroad, 

National Blank Book Co. , 

Nickerson, 

Nonotuck Silk Co., 

Norris, 



Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

South Hadley, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Hartford, 

Holyoke. 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

South Hadley 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Northampton, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Northampton, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Florence, 

Springfield, 



15 

18 

3 

9 
28 

5 

22 

18 
28 
6 
18 
30 

3 
24 

IS 
32 

2 
8 

22 
6 

29 

9 

1$ 

12 

8 

18 

32 

25 

14 

15 

15 

34 
2 



»11 



Notman Photo Co., 
Parfitt, W. H. & J. R., 
Parsons & Greene Paper Co., 
Pond's Extract, 
Prentiss, G. W. & Co., 
Preston, N. E., 
Rand, A. J., 
Randall, Herbert, 
Royce's Laundry, 
Russell, G. E. &Co., 
Russell, J. & Co., 
Schillare, A. J., 
Shuman, A. & Co., 
Sears, Lemuel & Co., 
Shreve, Crump & Son, 
Skinner, William & Co. , 
Smith, J. R., 
Smith & Murray, 
Smith & White Mfg. Co., 
Snow, Jesse S. , 
Springer, Bros., 
Springfield Knitting Co. , 
Springfield Y. W. C. A., 
Sorosis Shoe Co., 
Steams, R. H., 
Steiger, A. & Co., 
Steinert, 

Stetson, Foster & Co., 
Tilley, J. R. & Co., 
Tobey, F. G., 
True Bros., 
Tyrain Dyes, 
Valley Paper Co., 
VanNorman, Geo. H., 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., 
Walton, E. A., 
Ward, Samuel, 
Washburn, Mrs. F. M., 
Whiting Paper Co., 
Whitman, J. B., 
Worcester Corset Co. , 
Wright & Ditson, 



Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

New York, 

Holyoke, 

South Hadley, 

Holyoke, 

New Haven, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Northampton, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

Lynn, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Springfield, 

New London, 

Holyoke, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

Boston, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Holyoke, 

Worcester, 

Boston, 



30 

9 
10 

25 
12 

32 

9 

34 

14 

14 
16 

23 
32 

13 

29 
10 

20 

4 
II 

9 
32 

7 

2 

26 

27 
12 

5 

22 

20 

2 
6 

<9 
16 

3 

28 

2 

30 
32 
33 

31 
30 



This Store Seeks no Trade at the 
Expense of Good Will^ 



Anything poor, sure to cause dissatisfaction, finds no repre- 
sentation in these stocks; it is ^ great deal to have you know 
that you get only good things at Forbes & Wallace's. High 
prices are equally out of place here; the reputation of fair 
dealing is worth more than profit. 

But these virtues are all for business, of course. Success 
comes with good service and fair dealing ; more success the 
more you make good service and fair dealing an art. Let us 



Good service consists of getting the proper goods at the 
proper time, the bringing from anywhere in the whole world, 
the beautiful, the substantial, the serviceable, the useful, 
having them ready when wanted and making every facility to 
make easy and convenient trading ; fair dealing means the 
using of every means at command to secure the goods at 
the lowest prices, effecting every saving in the bringing of 
the goods to headquarters, being satisfied with a reasonable 
profit, finally passing them on to the customer at fair prices, 
and guaranteeing satisfaction. 

**Your money back, if, when you get home, you'd rather 
have ft than what you got for it,''— is the comer stone of this. 

FORBES & WALLACE, 

Comer Main, Vernon and Pynchon Streets, 

Springfield^ Mass« 



CALENDAR 

1898. 

April 20. Prof. 
George P. Baker of 
Harvard lectures to us 
on Debating. 



April 21. Senior 
Class surprised that 
they are not all ex- 
cused from Theism. 



April 22. Lecture 
by Dr. E. C. Hins- 
dale on *' Education 
of Women in Eng- 
land." 



CALHNDAR 



April 25. First 
Organ Recital by 
I'rof. Hammond. 



April 2b. Junior 
Entertainment. Hof- 
man's Pictures and 
Sacred Music. 



April 27. Flag- 
raising. Lecture by 
Alice Freeman Palmer 
on " Some Social As- 
pects of Modern Edu- 
cation for Women " 
followed by recep- 
tion at Brigham. 



THK BKS T BOOK STOR E ^ 

In this region and the largest is in Spring- 
field — 513-315 Main Street. We have 
3o,oco books in stock, besides an im- 
mense stock of carefully selected Station- 
ery. Call and see the second-hand books. 
Thai's the way to save money. 

PLATE AND 50 CARDS $1.00. 

^ HHNkY R. JOHNSON, 
BOOKSELLER 

AN[) 

STATIONER. 

MISS M. B. NORRIS, 

404 Main Street, 




•r* ^» «^ «^ 



Springf iekU • • 



FINK MILLINERY. 

HATS AND BONNETS 

Made to order at 
short notice. . . 
Mourniiig a Specialty. 



SPRINGFIELD, Y. W, C A. 

BOARDING HOME, 

^ ^ ^ 19 Bliss Street. 

Transients $1 a day. 

$^ 50 to $5 a week. 

NOON REST & EXCHANGE, 

46 Court Street 

WELCOME. 

^atch and Diamond Setting • 

Jewelry .J ' given 

Repairing • , personal attention. 

L. B. COE CO., 

batches. Diamonds and Jewelry. jH jH 

428 1-2 MAIN STREET. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Established 
20 years . . 



Next door to • • 
Smith & Mtsrray. 



E. A. WALTON & CO.. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

^^v ^^v ^^v 

HIGH CLASS PICTURE FRAMES. 

Agents for the leading 
Foreign and American Photographs J( ^ 
Jit jil Also Plaster Casts. Ji JH 



DRAPER 1. 

SELLS 

HUYLER^S CANDY. 



ALSO PURE MEDICINE 
AND TOILET GOODS. 

DRAPER S PHARMACY, 

410 Main Street, Springfield. 



HIGH 



BROADHURST BROS, 

' The Shoe Dealers. 



The Leading 

.. FOR.. 

High Grade 
Footwear. 



SHOES. 



376 MAIN STREET, 
SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 



^ Q:\obLr ^Q^ 



SHIRTINGS 




FOR 



^'^GHELO.^ 



189Q Now Ready. 

Shirts for busi- 

iS^'^ ness, wedding and 

fall dtess wear. 
Material by the yard for Ladies' Shirt Waists. 

DUNLAP & CO/S 

5th Avenue SAILOR HAT for Ladies. 

F. G. TOBEY & CO., 

Men'$ Hatters and Shirt Makers. 



U 



FOR ARTISTIC 

HIGH-GRADE 

PORTRAITS^-, 



VISIT 



Elegant Studio 



THE 

WORTHY 



Afawiutcly File " — ' 

EUROPEAN PLAN. 

WM. M. KIMBALL, Manager. 
SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 







6oM . . 
mtdaU '4S. 



Special Gold Medal, Photographer's 
Association of Ameiica. July 11-16. 
■'Grand I'rize," Gold Medal, Photo- 
grapher's Club of New England, July 
27-iq. First I'rize, Special class, 
Gold Medal, Photographer's Asso- 
ciation of Missouri, August 9-1 1. 



SO Torthlngtoa St. 
Next Pott Office. . 



SPRINGFIELD. MASS. 




n KCeORD TOR 

We enter at any price, furnish everythinK 
nmred. We "loan" also Silver. Chiia, Lini 
''h-'s and Walters. For NoveltieBseeour Fi 

BARR THE CATERER. 

CRKAM ... At Wholesa 



April 30. Please 
tahe notice there was 
one pleasant day dur- 
ing April. 



Iav 2. Presenta- 
I of American Hag 
to college by G. A, 
R. Post of Hartford. 
Conn. Lecture on 
Tennyson by Dr. W. 
Knight of the 
University at St. An- 
drews, Scotland. 



CALENDAR 



May 3. Senior 
Essays due ! A long, 
disnified, dusky- 
robed procession 
winds down to 
K ockefeller , where 
they wait — till Maysie 
reaches them to make 
their presentation. 
French plays a suc- 
cess. 



May 4. Amherst- 
Williams game has 
several supporters and 
sympathizers from 
this college. 



May s. Regula- 
tions of Students' 
League adopted. 



AN UP-TO-DATE DEPARTMENT STORE. 

SMITH & MURRAY. 

NEW THOUGHTS FOR SPRING WEAR. 
Women'. TaUor-Made Dtt„^ Ready to Vear. .Took ofTSnor^^MlL^ siil,! vr.'-?fh.^ u T. 

more comprehensive line than is usually shown outside of the largest cities. Our suits have 
all the elements of superiority, not a few of them. It means the Tarsrett assortment, the best 
and most original styles, and the lowest prices for equal qualities. SPECIAL SUITS MADE 
TO ORDER. Ten days required for delivery. No extra charge unless over 44 bust. 

ojit T|7-i-»- ^Ve carry the products of some of the best manufacturers in carefully selected 
OUK waiSCS. styles and colors. Prices lower than New York. 

U.^^A^m^J CI,3-4 Xir«2«4. Your wants in this line can be supplied by the ''Derby," "GriflFon.' ' 
unaerco onin waisis* 'iBeehive," and other leading makes from a big variety of patterns. 
Prices reasonable. 

New Dreas Goods. ^ large assortment of qualities, colors and weaves. Prices always the 
New Silks* immense variety. 

Always Reliable. Everything as represented or yotsr money back* 
SMITH & MURRAY, SPRINGFIELD. 



D. H. BRIGHAM & CO 



Tailor-Made Suits and G)stumes* 



^ 



Fine Millinery, Jackets and Golf 
Capes. Separate]' Skirts and Waists 
for all occasions. House Gowns, Pet- 
ticoats and Dressing Sacques 

A discount of lo per cent to college 
students. 



^ 



}99 & 401 MAIN ST., SPRINGFIELD, MASS, 



IV 



ART POTTERY. RICH CUT GLASS. STERLING SILVER. 

DAINTY BOHEMIAN GLASS VASES. 



Silver Plated ^are. 



Chafing Dishes. 



. . FIVE (yCLOCK TEA KETTLES. • . 



UMBRELLAS, 
LAMPS, 
TABLES, 



CLOCKS, 
CABINETS, 



JARDINIERES, 
DESKS, 

TABORETTES. 



Importer - CHARLES HALL, - Retailer. 
393-395 Main St., Springfield, Mass. 



M. STEINERT & SONS. 



34t MAIN ST., SPRINGFIELX), MASS. 
NEW ENGLAND REPRESENTATIVES FOR 



Pianos. 



STEINWAY & SONS, 

AND OTHER HIGH-CLASS 



Pianos. 



Graupner & Meyer Mandolins and Guitars, (the 

only make warranted for five years) 

Stewart Banjos, Symphenian Music Boxes, Violins, 
Autoharps, Phonographs, Graphophones. 



DEPOT FOR FOREIGN AND AMERICAN SHEET MUSIC. 



CALENDAR 



May 7. Bonfire 
and cheering for 
Dewey on Prospect. 



May q Second 
Organ Recital by 
Prof. Hammond. 



May 10. Lecture 
by Hamilton W. 
Maibieon '* The Edu- 
cation of a Hero." 



CALENDAR 

May II. '• Court- 
ship of Miles Stan- 
dish " given by P!»i 
Omega. 



May 13. '* Inaug- 
uration of the New 
Woman " given by 
Empire State Club. 



THE ARTISANS 



OF THE lEWELR^ TRADE 



T HE SKILLED DIAMOND SETTERS. 
AN2 WATCHMAKERS. . 



Sole Makers of 
MT. HOLYOKE IMNS. 




Sterling Gilt - - $s.oo 
Solid Gold $6.75 



Show their greatest achievements 
here. The outgrowth of their efforts 
is best shown in our stately stock, 
which for its assortment and variety 
will be appreciated by admirers of 
the best quality and distinctly differ- 
ent in design. 



SUCCESSORS TO F. A HUBBARD, 
HAYNES HOTEL BLOCK. 



TRUE BROS, JEWELERS & silversmiths 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



May 17. Fresh- 
men amuse the 
Juniors with the farce 

By Telephone." 



( ( 



THE HEIGHT OF 
THE FASHION 

During the comine Sprinf? and Sum- 
mer we will sell the exquisite Shirt 
Waist productions of Fisk, Clark & 
Flagc:. We also conduct our own cus- 
tom department and make Shirt Waists \ 
to measure 

Indies' Mannish Neckwear. Ladies' 
Knox Hats. Ladies' Travelling Bags. 

WRITE US. 

HORSFALL & ROTHSCHILD. 
Outfitters, - - HartfofcL 



THE FISK TEACHERS' 
AGENCIES 

EVERETT O FlSK & CO.. Proprietors 

4 Ashburton Place, Bo.ston, Mass.; 
156 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y.; 
1041 32nd Streot, Washington, D. C; 
378 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111 ; 
25 King Street, West, Toronto, Can.; 
414 Centliry Building, Minneapolis, Min. 
730 Cooper Building, Denver, Col.; 
825 Market Street. San Francisco, Cal.; 
52s Stim.son Block, Los Angeles, Cal. 



VISIT OUR STORE 

WHEN IN NORTHAMPTON. 



) 



J. E* LAMBIE & GO. 



The Leading Dry Goods House in the City. 



THE FRANKLIN, .3.3 maple st.. 

HOURS FOR MEALS. 

Breakfast, 6 00 to 9.00 
Dinner, 11.40 to a.oo. 
Supper, 5.30 to 7.00. 

SUNDAY : 

Breakfast, 8.«> to 10.00. 
Dinner, 3.00 to 5.00. 

TABLE BOARD. 

(jontlemen $4-00 per week. 

Ladies 3.50 " 

Singlo Meals .25 each. 



VI 




ElMER & AMEND 



and [mportersof ChemJcalb 
and Chemical Apparatus. 



Finest Rohemian anJ Gerinan Glassware, Royal Berlin and Meissen 
Porcelain, I'uresl Hammered Platinum, Balances and Weights, Zeiss 
Microscopes, Bact etiological Apparatus, Chemically Pure Acids and 
Assay Goods 



205^7-209-211 THIRD AVENUE, 
C»R. EIGHTEENTH STREET, 



J* Jt 



NEW YORK. 



COMFORT FOR BABY. 





The "ALMA" Vesis are niaJe ou 
special machinery, which knits the 
sleeve large at Ihe arm-hole and small 
a( the culT, These will last much 
longer than olher kinds, besides being 
more comfoilable, as Ihey will not 
shrink and bind under the arm, but will 
keep their shape after washing. Our 
Trade-mark is on every garment, ; ; 
j» Jt jt 



AT THE BEST DRY GOODS STORES. . . . 

SPRINGFIELD KNITTING CO.. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



May a4. 


Mo 


f 






11 




1900 




'98. 







CALENDAR 



May 2S. Still 
more rain ! ! ! 



May 26. Annual 
election of officers of 
Students' League. 



May 30. Sunshine 
at last ! Sing on 
the campus. 



(_:- 



R. F. KELTON & CO., 



y 



D 



• • • • • 



DEALERS IN 



Poultry and Vegetables, 
Fresh Fish and Oysters 



%iB %ie ^ Fresh and Salt Meats^ 



37 Main Street, ^ ^ j^ J^ Holyoke, Mass. 



PREPARATIONS FOR THE SPRING SEASON OF 1899 PROMISE 
MUCH FOR EVERY DEPARTMENT OF OUR STORE. . . . 



DRY GOODS, 
FURNITURE, 



In Reputation as Promotort of all that^s Best In 

LADIES' SUITS, LADIES' COATS, 

CARPETS, DRAPERIES^ 

CHINA and BRIC-A-BRAC 



Will be maintained at the highest point, and we sincerely invite your 
inspection and criticism, feeling assured that you will be interested in 
our various lines ^nd convinced that here are Quality, Styles and 
Variety superior to anything shown elsewhere in this section of New 
England. 



MEEKINS, PACKARD & ^mEAT, Ji Ji Ji SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Vlll 




E. D. BURNHAM. D. O. 

321 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 

t^-- OPTICIAN ANd'^WATCHMAKER. . . 

All errors or refraction carefully corrected 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry repairing promptly 
attended to. 

LIVERMORE & MARTIN. 

61 DWIGHT ST., HOI.VOKE, MASS. 

■■l|i|i|i|ll<|i|itl|l|:|i*i*i|i«iaia<S'a'aia.a,a, 

SELL 

DESKS 

PAPER BASKETS 
SCREENS 

COUCHES 

CHAIRS 

And many other things for your rooms. 



A. J. RAND. 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 



Hotel Hamilton Block, Holyoke, Mass 

COLLEGE SI'OONS. 
MT. TOM SPOONS. 

Careful attention given to Optical Prescription 

Work. 



JESSE S. SN O V, j» j» 

SEA GRILL AND FISH 

J« •^ .^ MARKET. 




HOLYOKE, MASS. 



360 High SU and . . 
Branch 156 High St. 



. M. W. GRIFFITH. . 

-^/i)LEADlNG FLORIST.®^ 



81 DWIGHT ST. 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



W. H. & J. R. PARFITT. 

DEALERS IN 
PAINTS 

WALL PAPERS 

PICTURE FRAMES. 

155 Main St., Holyoke, Mass. 

We offer special bargains in Picture Framing. 
Car fare given with all orders. 



C. T. FAY, 



Dealer In 



I LADIES ! ! 

A call at my Store any time will be 
appreciated by one who carries the 

i finest goods to be found in the State 

I in my line. 

NICKERSON, 

STATIONER. 

....^ I 15 DwiGHT AND T ^ o ^ 

UNDER WINDSOR HOTEL. 9 Main Telephones 116-5 & 116-3. 

ix 



FINE BOOTS AND SHOES. 

45 DWIGHT STREET. 



CALENDAR 



May 31. Orpheus 
Club and Prof. Ham- 
mond. Informal re- 
ception to club and 
ushers. 



June i. Fresh- 
man Mountain Day. 
Sophomores tramp to 
Lithia Springs. Se- 
niors leave us for 
their farewell visit to 
Mt. Holyoke. 



June 2. Return of 
Seniors. "Please 
what was your 
grind ? " 



CALENDAR 



PARSONS & GREENE CO. 



Jj.Nt 6. Basket 
ball trial game be- 
tween 'oo and 'gg. 
Score 4-2 in favor of 
1900. 



. ..MANUFACTURERS OF ... 



Choice Correspondence Papers 



A full line of the best and newest 
Papers in all the latest styles . . . 



June 7. Midsum- 
mer-Nights* Dream 
given by '99 on F^ros- 
pect. Great success. 



June 8. Field 
Day! 1900 done up 
in basket-ball. 
Races and boat races 
give excitement, and 
strawberries and 
cream refreshment. 
Freshmen have their 
picture taken down 
by the brook. 



CAN BE OBTAINED OF ALL STATIONERS 



HOLYOKE, MASS., U. S. A. 



TAFFETAS... 



A FULL LINE OF TAFFETA SILKS, 
IN ALL COLORS, SUITABLE FOR 
WAISTS AND LININGS, FOR SALE 
AT MANUFACTURERS' PRICES.-. •.• 



Wm. Skinner Mfg. Co 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 








W^ 



CALENDAR 
& 

June 15. A Mock 
Trial presented in the 
Debating Society. 



June 14 P 1 u g- 
ging for exams. 



June 15. Miss 
Osgood of Rocke- 
feller retires at 9 i*. 
M. extinguishing her 
light and wonders 
why all the girls in 
the house have ob- 
tained permission to 
sit up. 



A. STEIGER & CO. 



READY-TO-WEAR 
THINGS FOR 
DRESSY WOMEN... 



PRETTY SI'RING SUITS 
AND WAISTS 



HOLYOKE 



We are showing New, Spring Tailor- 
Made Suits. You will enjoy looking 
at the Styles, for there is something 
wonderfully attractive about them. 

A. STEIGER & CO. 



Miss McQuillan.... 

HAIRDRESSER 

Formerly located in A StcigerA Go's Millinery 
store, announces the REMOVAL of her business 
to No. ^78 High Street, opposite the old stand. 

THE NEW STORE IS THE FINEST 
HAIRDRESSING ESTABLISHMENT 
IN NEW ENGLAND. 

Where Hair Work, Shampooing, Facial and 
Scalp Massage and Manicuring are skillfully 
done. The new slock of Switches, Shell Novel- 
ties, side combs. Toilet Preparations and Hair 
Goods Is unusually Choice and Reasonable in 
Price. 

MISS McQuillan 

High Street, HOLYOKE, MASS. ' 

xn 



(J. W. PRENTISS, M. W. PRENTISS 

W. A. PRENTISS 



Geo. W. Prentiss 
& Co. 



ESTABLISHED 1857 



Wire 
Manufacturers 



Office and Works, 29 Dwight St., 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



Smith & White 
Mfg. Co. 

RIVERSIDE STATION 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



Manufacturers oi 



All Kinds of 

School 

Stationery 



OUR CHOCOLATES 

Are the finest specialties from 
several of the best makers, we sell 
them at 50 cts. lb. ... 

If you haven't .yet sampled 
them we would be glad to supply 
a sample. ..... 

THE HIGHEST QUALITY AT A MEDIUM PRICE 



CALENDAR 



CHAS. H. BALL . . . 



Bairs Corner 



227 High Street 



LEMUEL SEARS 



HENRY (i. sears! FITZGHRALD & CO. 



LEMUKL SHARS & CO. 



WHOLESALE AND 
RETAIL . . . 



GROCERS 



^ 



20-22 Dwight Street, 



28 Race Street, 



HOLYOKK, xMASS. 



All needful things 
in 

Books, Stationery 
Pictures and Frames 

Can be got at our 
store 

FlTZ(jHRALI) & CX). 

19O High St., 
. . . IIOLYOKE, MASS 

• • • 

XUl 



June 18-21. Com- 
mencement w e e k • 
See Commencement 
Calendar. 



Sept. 16. Bul- 
letin board overladen 
with * Moan signs." 



ShPT. 17. Y. W. 
C A. reception. 



Q RAPHOPHONES . ■ . 



Sept. \^. Juniors 
are seen skipping 
about the campus in 
pursuit of grasshop- 



son and Dr. Lowell 

Irightens Freshmen 
by sending them 
home for overshoes. 



Sept. 24, Tuskc- 
gee singers give us 
an enjoyable evening. 



$12.00^ $l=i^, $2=i.OO 

ALL THK NtW RECORDS AT $voo PtR DOZ. soC EACH 



T RIBUNE BICYCLES . . . 

f 2 i . 00, _$ 35 .JX), $=iO. 00 

NOTHING BETTER MADE 

G. E. RUSSELL & CO., 

24S-247 High Street, 0pp. City HalL HOLYOKE, MASS. 



MT. TOM RAILROAD, "Zl^F' 

SUMMIT 
HOUSE 

I,ji8 FEET 
ABOVE SEA 
LEVEL . . 




TAKE MOUNTAIN PARK CARS AT HOLYOKE P. O. 



DO YOU USE IT? 



j^ ^ National Separate Leaf Note Book. ^ ^ 

m m 

Arranged to carry the notes of all 
Studies, etc., in one cover. Re- 
movable at pleasure. Ask for them. 
Dealers keep them. Colleges and 
Universities have adopted them. 



U 



NATIONAL BLANK BOOK CO. 

HOLYOKE. MASS. 



. AS HOLYOKE'S LEADING DRUGGIST 



WE RECOMMHND 



A. F. GLESMANN, # 0^ 

229 High St , Cor. Dwight, 
Holyoke. 



** The College Girls' Rendezvous." 



THE FINEST DRESSES . . . 

Costumes, gloves, etc., 
thoroughly cleaned with- 
out injury to goods or 
color at the 

ELMWOOD DYE WORKS. 

ow'citTH'rir- 8« Dwight St., HOLYOKE. 



CHOICE CUT FLOWHRS 



AT 




s 



64 DWIGHT ST., 



E. L. LYMAN, # %^ 

. . . DEALER IN ALL KINDS OK . . . 

MEATS, FISH, 

POULTRY. 
AND VEGETABLES. 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



107 DWIGHT STREET. 

XV 



CALENDAR 

Sept. 27. Second 
anniversary of t h e 
fire. Hopes baffled, 
for Mountain Day is 
not announced. Seats 
given out in the 
chapel. 



Sept. 28. *'The 
Notches" walk to 
Notch. 



Sept. 10. Seniors 
appear in cap and 
gown. 



CALENDAR 



Oct. 2. North- 
field meeting. 



Oct. 4. Senior 
reception to Fresh- 
men. Rockefeller's 
Juniors give scenes 
from Alice-i n-W on- 
derland for the enter- 
tainment of the other 
Juniors. Sophomores 
have candy-pull and 
dance at Pearsons. 



Oct. 10. Moun- 
tain Day. 



c. B. PREscoTT VALLEY PAPER CO. """• "^'^"'*' spencer 

TREAS. * A88T. TREA8. 



"Valley Paper Co. Bond 1899" 

No. X Bond Regular List 

"Commercial Bond 1899'' 

One-Half Regular List 

'^Valley Library Linen" 

For High Grade Papcteries 

'Valley Linen Ledger 1899" 

A Strictly No r Ledger 

i **Co mmerclal Linen Ledger" | 
I "Oar Ledger" f 

Lead all the No. 2 Ledgers 



"French Linen." Wove and Laid 

Cream Laid Linen and White Wove 
Bond, the Foremost of No i Linens 
"Old English Linen and Bond" 

Standard for Fine Commercial W^ork 
"Congress Linen and Bond" 

The Best Low-Priced Linton and Bond Made 
"Old Valley Mills 1899" 

Extra Superfine 
"Valley Paper Co. Superfine" 

As Good as the Best 
"Valley Forge Flats" 

Extra Fine Quality 



HOLYOKE. MASS. 



M. P. CONWAY 



SHEET MUSIC and 
MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



PIANOS 'AND ORGANS 



The Largest Assortment of Pianos and Organs of any Dealer in Western Mass. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS TO RENT 

309 MAIN ST., SPRINGFIELD 30s HIGH ST.. HOLYOKE 

Telephone, 629-2 Springfield, Mass. Telephone, 356-4 Holyoke, Mass. 



SEE OUR LINE OF 



BICYCLES 



VICTORS... 



...VICTORIAS... 



...LAMELS 




J. 



THIS IS A GOOD TIME TO HAVE YOUR WHEEL REPAIRED 
BRING IT IN AT ONCE AND AVOID THE RUSH 

HAMILTON HOUSE BLOCK 



RUSSELL & CO. 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



XVI 




Oct. 14. Sopho- 
mores send out invi- 
tations for a leccplton 
to given to the Fcesh- 



OcT. 15. Sopho- 
mores vote to give 
aforesaid teceptton. 



Oct. 19 Memo- 
rial service for Edith 
Bryant, 1903. 



THE TWO STANDARDS. 



CALENDAR 



Oct. 19. Edward 
Baxter Perry's recital. 
Miss Mohn visits 
Mary Lyon's birth- 
place and picks "blue 
jenkings." 



Oct 24. For ex- 
citement, Miss Fran- 
ces Foster breaks her 
glasses. 



Oct. 25. Junior- 
Freshman reception. 
Apple -cutting and 
dancing. Sopho- 
mores' minstrel show. 
Seniors' district 
school. 



DEAN*S ART GALLERIES. 

Visitors Always Welcome. 

The young ladies of Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege will be delighted with pictures that can 
be secured at Dean's Art Store. If you wish 
any artistic pictures for the beautifying of your 
rooms, do not fail to visit us at 

32oHi(iHST., - - HOLYOKE, MASS. 



CHARLES E. BARDWELL. 

J« THE COLLEGE DRUGGIST ^ 
\M Main St., Near B. & M. Station. 

Selk Eastman Kodaks and Photo Supplies. 
Eastman^s Perfumes. Baker's Chocolates* 
Allegfretti's and Wallace's Chocolates. Pro- 
phylactic Tooth Brushes. A fine chocolate 
assortment 25c pound. Bardwell's Tooth 
Powder and BardwelPs Orchid Cream for 
the Complexion. Jt Jt «^ 

THKRE IS A LRADKR IN KVKRY WALK 
AND AVOCATION OF LIFK. 



Napoleon. 

Dewey. 

Depew. 

(ilad.stone. 

Cramp. 

Fri.s.scll. 



In Military History, 
In Naval fiistory. - 
In After Dinner Oratory, 
In Statesmanship, 
In Ship HuildinK, - 
In Hi ead, Cake, and Icecream 
Manufacturinjr, - - - 
For IS years KO^^ds of Frissell's Manufacture 
have been the standard of existence. 

They have had Competitors, but no serious 
ones. They have had Imitators, but no suc- 
cessful ones. 

In ordering Hread, cake. Pastry, Ice Cream, 
and Ices : be sure and order of 

GLEN C. FRISSELL. . . . 

413 High St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Your attention is called to the fact that the 
Photographs made by 

W B Mil FS '51 High St.. 



Bear the Stamp of Superior Workmajiship. 

j^ «^ V* 

Special Rates Offered to the Ladies of Mt. 
Holyoke College. 

Vm, B* MILES, ArtUt. 



WINTHROP HOTEL 

MERIDEN, CONN. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 

PKOPKIKTORS 

1£; HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



SS GOODALL'S 

Means carrying out your doctor's 
wish to the very letter. 

First Handlers of Everything 

. . . . In the Drug Line. 

GOODALL DRUG CO., 
Next to Pest Office^ Holyoke. 



M. HIRT, 

TAILOR HATTER 

mm AND FURNISHER 



269 High Street. 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



W.J. CADY,-#- 

LEADING 
PHOTOGRAPHER. 



Special Rates to Schools and Collas:! 

Headquarters for Amateur Finishing at Low 

Rates 

109 E>wight St», Holyoke, Maw* 



XVlll 



TYRIAN DYES- 



^ 



fYRIAN DYE Silks arey\^lways FAST COLOR. Ip 
you doubt our assertion, ^oil of any other Silk, ^ 
{^ed, blue, green or yellowQhade, and compare it, a^ 
|t boils, with that shade(^f ours, and note the resul J[ 
y^ll who use them wilj^ be found Enthusiasti(^ 
^^ ever be persuaded to yj se other silk than ours. Tw(J 
JJyers can never make | he shade equally beautifu | ^ 
Y^ears of untiring experim|^nt by our MR. NEWEY s(J 
jl^ntirely changed our co J[^ or system that there is no bette J^ 
^old by all first-class Dr y Goods and Art Store J^ 



z:) 



NEW LONDON WASH SILK CO. 



HAMMOND. KNOWLTON & CO.. AC.LNTS. 



BOSTON, 
100 Chauncy Street. 



Jm (^5* %/^ ^* 



NEW YORK. 
1^6-l^Z-l^ Broadway. 



CALENDAR 



Oct. 2 o. Miss 
Oouglierty gets down 
to supper on time! 



Oct. 28 Prof. 
Jacobus from Hart- 
lord T h e o I ogical 
.Seminary con ducts 
weekly prayer meet- 
ing. 



Oct. II. Hallo- 
we'en spreads. Cake 
walk at Rockefeller. 



XIX 



CALENDAR 



Nov. 2. Ventril- 
oquist amuses Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen. 



Nov. 3 Sopho- 
more-Freshman boat 
races 1901 victorious. 
Some ardent Juniors 
and Freshmen rise at 
S a. m. to attend a 
flag raising near Mary 
Lyon Hall. 



Nov. 8. Fresh- 
man have a picnic in 
Assembly Hall. 



John Tilley & Co. 

...Always carry a large line of... 

Ladies' Desks, Bcx>k Cases. •• 

•••Rockers, Foot Rests, Screens.** 

—Rugs, Couches, Waste Baskets 

...AND... 

...Everything Suitable for College Rooms... 

273-279 High Street 

HOLYOKE 



Don't Scatter Your 
Dollars 

Unwisely among the great quantity of grocery 
cheapness. Consult your stomach. Non dyspep- 
tic, always digestible and highly nutritive. Our 
prices sing their own song. .... 

Quality gives us an advantage over all compe- 
titors, and we give the most possible for the 
lowest consistent prices. ..... 

.-. J. R. SMITH'S .-. 



CASH GROCERY AND TEA HOUSE 



274 HIGH STREET 



XX 



CALENDAR 



Full of Wise 

Saws .... 



IVi' leave 7io stone un turned to give 
satisfaction. Exceptions prove the rule that 
we succeed in this; and certainly X:^ is 
IV ell paid that is ivell satisfied. 

Our facilities for promptly executing 
College work are unsurpassed. Try us. 



The Bryant Press 

Florence, Mass. 



Printers of Llamarada 



Nov. 9. Found- 
er's Day. 



Nov. 15. Juniors 
give scenes from 
Alice-in- Wonderland 



Nov. 18. First 
organ recital of year 
given by Prof. Ham- 
mond in Mary Lyon 
Chapel. 



XXI 




Dr. H. O. Hastings, 

> ^ > DENTIST. 

199 High Street, Holyoke, Mam^ 

Intercollegiate B ureau I ^'^ ""'""** ■^^'^ ^^ 



COTBELL i LEONARD, j STHTSON. FOSTHR & CO. 

472 to 478 Broadway, Alb»ny, N. Y -^^^^-*~™,-.™-,~«~™,-v,„^_^ 

I Imporlcn and ManuUcturen ^\ 
"~*~™"~~ PAPER-HANGINGS, 

INTEWOR DECORATIONS, 
FURNITURE, 

DRAPERIES, ETC. 
JtJtJt 
jq PRANKlIN ST., BOSTON. 

Telephone: 1146 BOSTdN 



MAKERS of the CAPS and GOWNS lo 
Mt. Holyoke, Welleslev, Bym Mawr, 
Radclifte. Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, etc. 



lUtatrated Bulletin, etc., upon rcqucit.^JlJl 



KENNEY & SULLIVAN MFG. CO. 



C~" 



Plumbing and 
Steam Fitting. 



House Heating by St eam or Hot Water a Specialty. 

Ve use tbe Celebrated Richmond Steam and Hot TatCT Hutcfb 
and Guarantee them to heat your (uhoc in all vtitbtrJ^J^JfJtJI 



Nov. i<). Fresh" 



7V7S MAIN STRKKT, HOLYOKK, MASS. 



OVER THE RIVER AT 

BRIDGMAN'S BOOK SHOP 



The Finest Stationery* 



MAY BE FOUND ALL 
G>llege Text Books Used. ^ ^ ^ ^ J^ 

Fottntain and Gold Pens. 
FIRST-CLASS ENGRAVING of ADDRESS CARDS, MONOGRAMS, at LOWEST RATES. 

Mail Orders SoluMted. Northampton, 1899. 

S. E. Bridgman. C. H Lvman. 



SCHILL ARE'S 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

Society, Class ^ ^ and Group Work > •?( a Specialty 

PROMI>T ATTENTION GIVEN TO STUDENTS. 



A. J. SCHILLARE. 



MAIN STREICT, 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



C. N. FITTS, •* Northampton, Mass. 

COLLEGE FURNISHING. . 



More than one-half of our business 
the past few years has been in . . . . 

STUDENT FURNITURE, 
DRAPERIES, 



FURNISHING COLLEGE DORMITORIES, 
and PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. 

INCLUDING 

DESKS, TABLES, ETC 

RUGS, SCREENS, 



CALENDAR 



and all the items of merchandise used by students. 

We solicit correspondence and will certainly save 
all purchasers at least 10 per cent., and deliver 
the goods at Mt. Holyoke College in good 
condition 



C. N. FITTS. 



Each September, at the opening of the College 
year, we shall have in Soulh Hadley a stock 
of merchandise iii Furniture, Rugs and Drapery 
Goods to show the students of Mt. Holyoke 
College 



Dec. 2. Havana 
cigar man recom- 
mended to Mount 
Ho'yoke College by 
friends at Amherst. 



Dec 4. Prof. 
Genung of Amherst 
College addresses lis. 



Dfx. 6. Brigham 
Sophomores en t e r- 
tain Sophomores and 
Brigham Seniors . 
Brigham Juniors en- 
ter tain Brigham 
Freshmen. Dr. 
Hooker's girls give an 
informal reception. 



XXUl 



CALENDAR 



Dec 7. House 
reception at Pearsons 



Dec. 9. Prof. 
Titchener of Cornell 
University lect u r es 
on *' Mental Tele- 
pathy." Miss Edith 
Haskell forgets to go 
to Chemistry class! 



Dec. 13 "Pictures 
in Porcelain " pre- 
sented by class of 
1901. 



The wise Gollege Girl goes to 



GRIDLEY'S 



When She \^ants 



STATIONERY or BLANK BOOKS. 



^e make a specialty of the 

NATIONAL SEPARATE LEAF NOTE BOOK. 



in all Sizes and Styles. Indispensable 
to an up-to-date student. 



Toilet Articles and a Choice Line 
of Gmfectionery^ Fruitst Etck^ik 



C A. GRIDLEY. 



2S College Street, South Hadley, Mass. 



Howard, Gaylord & Co. 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



SASH, DOORS and BLINDS. 



VENEERED DOORS A SPECIALTY. 



ALL ORDERS BY MAIL 
PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



SOUTH HADLEY, 
MAS& 



XXIV 



MT. HOLYOKE, «EEi^^ 



■THK FINHST CULTIVATED VIKW IN NEW ENGLAND. 

The pure air. purest of spring water, good board, comfortat 
iences. telescope, etc., make this a most ArrnACTive resort fo 
even a few hours. Special altention given lo College parties. 
MOUNTAIN STAGE3 MEET PASSENGERS AT UNION STATION. NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 

B.45. 11.15. a. m.. 1.45. 4.J0 and 6.30, p. m., also at 5.30, p. m.. Saturdays only. 

If notified in advance parties of Icur or more can be met at any time between 9. a.m.. and 
6. p. m., al Northampton. Hadley ot Electric Cars at ^cuth Hadley. 

There mil be stopping at the hotel in July an able Botanist. Dr. S. M. Criffm. and in August an 
able Geologist, Prof. W. H. C. Pynehcn, to conduct parties snd entertain interested guests without 
extra expense. 

p . Board, per day. $2.50, Ttensient visitors, admission to grounds. 25 cents. Inclined 

r rICcS> Railway. 25 cents each way. Round trip from Northampton, $1.25. Transient meals. 
25 to 75 cents. 

House open from May 20 to October 20, 

P.O.Addr<a! MRS. J. W. f-RENCH, 
TdcKTiph and Tclcpboae via Holyoke. Mt. Holyobct Northvnpton, BAui, 



To the weary sufferer, 
almost frantic witti pain, 
tlie use of tfte true 

POND'S EXTRACT 

means "a fair good night, 
and pleasing dreams, and 
slumbers light." .„„„„„ ,™ 

o AVO[D SUBSTITUTES 





CALENDAR 



Singster speak, „.. 
" Novels ;ind novel 
residing. " 




FTUKSHORMAKlCkS- Jl 



rsof fashion, and will 



UK. and we will forward. exprcsK piiid. 
■ handwimety illuslraled catal(if[ue en 
ii'es directlfinii fur iirdcrini;. and ahoi 
riK the iww mannfHh RliidelB, 
tu PupnUr PHi-candtheHeHt Sh< 



TKADK MARK 

inded into til e .Sole of Ev 
■■SOROSIS" SHOK. 



y within your 
most elegant 

[iiion"to»fler.- 
onreoflpiofn 

rs shapes and 

I Any 



^1 wnmankind, 

lailprii-e. ^^■I'J 
lonial letterx from 



ATTION ! — Avoid disappointment hydidininV loaccejrt aubMitotes. 

A. E. LITTLE & CO., 89 BLAKE ST.-, LYNN, MASS. 




EsUblished 1847. 



R. H. Steams & Company, 



DRY GOODS. 



b 

TRHMONT ST.. AND TKMPI.H I>LACH, 



BOSTON. 



men to Seniors. Old 
Folks Concert. 



CALENDAR 

Feb. 2. Day of 
Sleep for Colleges. 



Feb. 3. Lecture 
on * * The Bradford 
Manuscript" by Hon. 
Alfred S. Roe. 



IKCORPORATED. 



Feb. 6. Memorial 
Service for Eva Fran- 
ces Smiih '99. 



Feb. 13. Blizzard! 
Recitations continue 
as usual. 



Wadsworth, Howland & G)« 

ARTISTS' MATHRIALS ^>"^ 
DRAFTSMEN'S SUPPLIES 



Manufactufcfs of and 
Dealers in 



cf every description* 



We have prepared a superior line of Moist Water colors for College and School 
use, put up in pans, half-pans and tubes. Special rates to Students 



a2-84 Washington Street, BOSTON.,^,^,^ 
428 Union Street, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Factories: 
MALDEN^MASS. 



c p. grimmer, 
Floral Decorator 

^3l* 3l* St* 36* 
CHOICE CUT FLOWEE^. 

34 West Street, - - BOSTON. 



GOTO 



ATHERTON'S 



FOR 



piNK M'LLI.N.KRY. 



2)3 High Street, 



HOLYOKE. 



L P. HOLLANDER «S. CO. 



Ladies' Tailor Gowns; 



We make a specialty of Tailor Gowns in exclusive and original designs. The 
materials include Homespuns, Canvases, Cheviots and Broad 
cloths. They are made up entirely over Silk and the prices 
range from 3j>lS TO $00 



Rainy Day and Golf Skirts From «^ 



JACKETS. 
UNDERWEAR. 



GOLF CAPES, Etc. 
GLOVES. 

and SILKS. 



$12 to $16. 

MILLINERY. 
DRESS GOODS. 



Samples sent on application. 



BOSTON: 



^ ^ ^ ^ 2)2 to 2)2 Boylston Street and Park Square. 



xxviu 



..SUMMER PUBLICATIONS 

ISSUED BY THE -'^-• 

BOSTON & MAINE R. R. 

DESCRIPTIVE OF 

NEW ENGLAND SCENERY 

AND SUMMER RESORTS 



CALENDAR 



Fishing and Hunting 
Among the Mountains. 
Southeast New Hampshire. 
Central Massachusetts. 
Lake Sunapee. 
The Monadnock Region 



Fully Dlustratedt and Containing ValuaUe Maps. 

All Along Shore. 

Lakes and Streams. 

Southwest New Hampshire. 

Merrimack Valley. 

Lake Memphremagog and About There. 

Excursion and Summer Hotel Book — Free. 



The Valley of the Conn., and Northern Vermont. 

ANY OF THE ABOVE PUBLICATIONS WILL BE SENT ON 
RECEIPT OF TWO CENTS IN STAMPS FOR EACH BOOK. 

ADDRESS: J^ ^ Passenger Department Boston & Maine R. R., Boston^ Mass. 

D. J. FLANDERS, General Passenger and Ticket Agent. 



SHREVE, CRUMP 
& LOW CO. J^ J^ 



147 Tremont Street, 
BOSTON. 



^* %s^ ^* ^^ 



Watches. 

Jewelry, 

ujamonds. 



^* ^* J^ fS^ 

FINEST ASSORTMENT OF STATIONERY. 
Glass Pins. <^ t^ Umbrellas. 



OUR NEW... 

Ladies' hat 
Department. 

We Import and Make to Order 
Exclusive Designs in 

DRESS, STREET, ENGLISH WALKING 
AND SAILOR HATS. 

FUR DEPARTMENT. 

...A Specialty is made of Custom and Re- 
pair Work of all kinds of Furs during the 
Spring and Summer months at reasonable 
prices. 

... Furs Stored and Insured against fire and 
moths at low rates. 



LAMSON & HUBBARD, 

Furriers, Men's and Ladies' Hatters, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Feb. 14. 
tine spreads. 



Valen- 



Feb. 21. Winter 
concert by Mt. Hol- 
yoke College Glee, 
Banjo and Mandolin 
Gubs. 



XXIX 



CALENDAR 



Feb. 23. Saflord 
Hall entertains Rocke- 
feller. One o! How- 
ells* farces presented. 



Feb. 28. Topsy 
Turvy party given 
1 901 by 1900. 



Mar. 2 Organ re- 
cital and reception. 



Mar. 3. **The 
cream of all the facul- 
ty, of course we have 
at Brigham." 



'r<.i»»t,»M<>e . < Back Bay 208. 
Telephones : - cambridjfe 139-2 

NOTMAN ^^- Bo^'Ri^oN, 

General Manafij^er. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPANY, 

3 Park St. and 384A. Boylston St., Boston. 

Also, 1286 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridjfe. 

MINIATURES ON IVORY, and PORCELAI.N. 
FORTKAITS, ENI.ARGEMENTS. 

ARTISTIC PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Photographers for Class '99, Smith College- 



Photographic Su p plies 

OUR SPECIALTY. 

Developing and Printing 
for the Amateur* <^ <^ 

Dame, Stoddard & Kendall, 

374 Washington Street, Boston* 

Catalogue on application. 




WRIGHT & DITSON, 

FINE ATHLETIC GOODS J^J^ ^p 



CROQUET, 
SKATING, 



Every Requisite for 

GOLF, 

BASKET BALL, 
and the GYMNASIUM 



TENNIS, 
PHOTOGRAPHY 



nrtjnplJTJO D A T T a new game invented by Mr. J^ehmann 
1 !-• 1 niilV 0/\J^l^ of Trinity College. England. 

Catalogues, Samples, etc., sent Postpaid to any address. Mail orders 
given prompt and careful attention. 

WRIGHT & DITSON, '^^'"'^Slii^^^^'^J^'''^^''^ 



Samuel Ward G)mpany, 

49 Franklin Street, 
BOSTON, MASS. 

PROPRIETORS OF THE CELEBRATED 

BOSTON LINEN, 
BOSTON BOND 
AN" BUNKER HILL 

FINE STATIONERY 

ENGRAVING and EMBOSSING 

... FOR ... 

Fraternity, College and Society Use. 

Unexcelled Hfotk^ 

Reasonable Prices. 

Information cheerfully furnished. 

XXX 



Hotel Vcndomc 



BOSTON. 



V 



CONVENIENTLY SITUATED. 
DELIGHTFULLY SURROUNDED, 

AND IN EVERY WAY 

Desirable for Transient Visitors and Tourists. 



Most Approved Plumbing* 

Lighted Throughout by Ekctridty* 

C. H, GREENLEAF & CXX, Pfopfietort. 



FINEST ROAD-BED on th« CONTINENT . 

BOSTON & ALBANY RAILROAD. 

THROUGH tAR SERVICE IN EFFECT JUNE i, i8i>q. 



ilibiiled SlL-eplnK Cars. BoKtnn tr> Chki 



'. K. K.. and Kimi 



lied Buffet Library Smoking Car 
a L. S. & M. S. K. K.. and alMi v'a 
nute ; DinfnK Car Service 
rtibuled Sleeping Cars, Boston to 

HiifFet Vestibulpd Sleeping Cam. 



I>etrnll and Chid 



l,.'s. & M. ii 



, and Was 






Qty 



Cfncinnati. 

-I^aVEH ItUH 

Albany, ai 

W inrormation. mapd. time lahlES. ticket!!. Hnil ac-cnm modal Inns in Drawl UK-room and 
It-Cars, apply to iigents of Boston* Albany H. R , at Its several stations. 

The boly Firet<laik Through Car Lint ftom New England to the Wett. 

Ticket Office, *• ^ 366 Washingttm St., Boston. 

J. T,. WHITK, Cily PassenBer and Ticket Agent, 
A, S HANSON, (ieneral I'assenger Agent, 




RoyAL 

Worcester 

Corsets. 

If You Want Corsets That 
FIT WELL. 
FEEL WELL. 
WEAR WELL, 

RoyAL Worcester 
Corsets. 



Mar. 8. i 
Bachelor Maid." 



d principles of 



hygiene. 

Keyal Ulercttttr eenttt 

are sold and recommended by 
all leading dealers. If your 

ttlercntir Cerftt Co., 

WORCESTER MASS. 



Germs and their Ireat- 



Mar. II. Lecture 
by Carroll D Wright 
on " The Relation of 
Industrial History to 
Modem Intellectual - 
Advancentent." 



Mar. 14. 

Dramatics. 
Jack Trust." 



Averill of Spiingfield 
High School lectures 
on Methods of Teach- 
ing Histoiy. 



Marie N. Buckman 
spetlcs on Egyptian 
Exploritions. Rocke- 
relter Houie Play 
" The Rest Laid 
Schemes' by Paul 
Leicettec Fotd. 



THE NEW DEPARTURH 

OK A 
tS-DISTiNCTIVE GARMENT HOUSE 



THE SCIENCE OF HIGH 
CLASS MEN'S TAILOR- 
ING EXEMPLIFIED IN 
LADIES' SUITS AND 
LADIES' COATS 

A. SHUMAN & CO. 



TuUngton utd J* & 
BOSTON. 



LADfES" FASHIONABLE 

CLOAKS 

... SPRINGER BROS 

Wholesale and Retail. 
(Street, - - Bodoo. 



Discounts to Teicheis and Students of the 
Coll.«e. 

Dear Madam : — 

/ have reopened my kair-dtess- 
ing parlors in Onfr. 'Bait's new 
block, uhere the name courteous at- 
tention u'lll be given my patrons as 
in the past. Hoping that you will 
continue your patronage. 

I rrmaim vtry sinctrily yeuTi , 

Mrs. F. iM. W^ashburn. 

T»tt EIrvalft l» fifth fi»*r 




N. H. PRESTON. D.D.S. 

SOUTH HADLEY, MASS. 



OUR LADIES' BOOTS AT |i, 

LOW SHOES AT %i, 

SLIPPERS AT »!.- 
Are special good values not only in 
wearing qualilies but in style and 

nt 



MORSE & HAYNES. 

Retailers of Shoes. 
}83 Main St., SPtmcnbLD, Mas». 



IVHITING 'S 



STANDARD 



^diPJPERS^ .A 



/-v .rx rv/vy^ ^ 




Pure Fibrc«48 

Delicate«^ 

Surfaced 



Perfects 
Writing*iR 
Quality «aB 



Specially adapted for Q>mmercial and Fine Corresponding; 

Purposes. 

♦.♦For Sale by all Dealers..^ 



WHITING PAPER CO. 



NEW YORK. 



CHICAGO. 



PHILADELPHIA 



MILLS: JiOLYOKE, MASS, 



CALENDAR 



Mar. 22. •• Do 
the Juniors write such 
things as *Bible es- 
says ? " Scotch and 
liish Balbds in the 
evening. 



Maw. 25. Organ 
recital by Fred L. 
Clark. 



jcxxin 



" Wh»l part of Ihe 
Bible did Wycliffe 
tramlale?" E. B-tl-s, 

"TheScripturts." | 



NATURE 



^^ NATUR 
'^^ .-HIGHES 

• huma: 



HIGHEST 
HUMAN 
SKILL , 




HERBERT RANDALL. 

High Class Portraiture. 

New Haven, Conn, utd Ann Afbor. Mtcfi. 
jtjijitjtjt 

PHOTOGRAPHER TO 
Yak. Michigan Univenity. 



TesUyan. 



Mounl Holyolw. 



Hardly necessary to say to 
the Ladies Ihal the dainty Shirt 
Wai't must be Suitably Laun- 
dered in Older to give pleasure 
to the wearer. Others may do 
up these things after a fashion. 
we do them well. Collars, too. 
Ours are like new. Our agent 
calls at the College regularly. 



KOYCE'S LAUNDRY. K. A TH*vii«, Apt. 



'. ESLEECK, Treasurer. 



ESLEECK PAPER CO. 



FINE WRITING P APERS. 



TUB SIZED AND LOFT DRIED. 



HOLYOKE, MASS.